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Bonsai kittesn as noted above is a hoax site. Thank goodness.
http://www.snopes.com/critters/crusader/bonsai.asp

However, Twisty cats are real as are Munchkins (overly short legs.. a mutation that has been perpetuated), Sphinx Cats (no hair and wrinkled skin), Scottish Folds (folded ears), American Curl (curled ear tips), Manx (no tail) and Japanese Bobtail (tail appears shortened and is, but is twisted with frozen joints).

In Japan the "street cat" is the Bobtail.. it is as common as long tailed domestic shorthair cats are here in the US. Scottish folds originated from a single cat in Scotland and the folding occurs in various degrees, with many folds being "straight eared" carriers of the gene.

Muchkins and twisty cats developed in much the same way as the Scottish fold tho both are more recent mutations. Neither "breed" is recognized by Cat Fanciers Association. Recognized breeds for this organization can be seen here:
http://www.cfainc.org/breeds.html

The International Cat Association does recognize Munchkins. Their Breed list can be seen here:
http://ticaeo.com/content/publications/standard.htm

This is just information, and not an endorsement of any kind on my part.
 

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These same people breed horses. After that show was on they got upset and changed their whole website saying that they only bred for one litter of twisty cats on purpose but decided they didn't all come out looking the way they wanted so they stopped breeding for them but they breed Poly cats and I doubt they health test. I was going to email them and ask about health testing and other stuff to see what they do and don't do...ya know. But I also wanted to check out what horses they breed...I think they breed the cats for money and put all thier hard work into breeding the horses...
To my knowlege there is no health testing for cats.
 

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I used to show cats and breed them. Some of the health tests I did were for Feline Leukemia virus, Feline Infectious peritonitis and Feline Immunodeficiency (these three tests were done before every breeding of a female as well as once a year for the males and the females). I also had the cats used for breeding vetted for any other abnormalities such as heart problems or cancer. Heart problems (arhythymias) can be genetic. Cats with murmurs should not be used for breeding. Breathing problems can also be an issue.. such as undersized lungs.

It is also important to have a certificate showing the cat has no upper respiratory virus as these can be chronic. There are vaccines for some (but not all) upper respiratory viruses.. so you have to be VERY careful with your cattery. URI in cats can lead to blindness (if they get eye ulcers) and even death.

In addition to that stuff, I was very fussy about temperment. Only cats who showed without fear around people or in the show ring were used for breeding.

Ultimately I was so fussy about who got kittens and what sort of home they went to I was not selling the offspring. :rolleyes: I elected to stop breeding and showing cats at that point.

PS: Polydactylism (7 or more toes) is genetic and is not allowed on show cats (CFA). Any cat showing this abnormality was immediately altered as were any other family members to prevent more multi toed cats. If I had a 'twisty' cat born it would have been altered and not sold or promoted. I would have altered the parents etc. of any such cat as well upon advice of my vet (To be sure it was a genetic issue and not an issue born out of nutrition etc.).
 

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To my knowlege there is no health testing for cats.
Omg that's horrible! Why wouldn't there be health testing for cats?...:( no wonder these mutations keep popping up.

EDIT:
Feline Immunodeficiency (these three tests were done before every breeding of a female as well as once a year for the males and the females). I also had the cats used for breeding vetted for any other abnormalities such as heart problems or cancer. Heart problems (arhythymias) can be genetic. Cats with murmurs should not be used for breeding. Breathing problems can also be an issue.. such as undersized lungs.

It is also important to have a certificate showing the cat has no upper respiratory virus as these can be chronic. There are vaccines for some (but not all) upper respiratory viruses.. so you have to be VERY careful with your cattery. URI in cats can lead to blindness (if they get eye ulcers) and even death.

In addition to that stuff, I was very fussy about temperment. Only cats who showed without fear around people or in the show ring were used for breeding.

Ultimately I was so fussy about who got kittens and what sort of home they went to I was not selling the offspring. I elected to stop breeding and showing cats at that point.

PS: Polydactylism (7 or more toes) is genetic and is not allowed on show cats (CFA). Any cat showing this abnormality was immediately altered as were any other family members to prevent more multi toed cats. If I had a 'twisty' cat born it would have been altered and not sold or promoted. I would have altered the parents etc. of any such cat as well upon advice of my vet (To be sure it was a genetic issue and not an issue born out of nutrition etc.).
Okay good there are health test. :D

EDIT...once again:

Oh and that's exactly why this twisty cat thing is popping up. They're breeding two abnormal cats together and that's why a mutation like this showed up. They shouldn't even be breeding Poly cats...obviously if you breed cats with something abnormal like extra toes eventually your going to have something worse pop up.
 

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They're breeding two abnormal cats together and that's why a mutation like this showed up. They shouldn't even be breeding Poly cats...obviously if you breed cats with something abnormal like extra toes eventually your going to have something worse pop up.
Well, not necessarily. Polydactylism is fairly common in feral cat populations and in barn cat populations. These cats can breed for years and not have any other problems. Seven toed cats can have the extra toes removed but usually they are left and there is no real problem to the cat.

I do not even know if polydactylism is recessive or dominant genetically.

Often if a trait is recessive, you can improve the chances of it showing up in the phenotype by breeding animals that are related either line breeding or in breeding.

Recessive traits are not ALWAYS bad. Dominant traits are not ALWAYS good. In the human being (for instance) webbing between the fingers of the hand is a dominant trait. Most humans are born with no webbing between their fingers so most humans exhibit the phenotype for the recessive trait. Both genes for a recessive trait must be present for the trait to be exhibited in the phenotype. Dominant genes only require one gene to be present for the phenotype to show the trait.

In the case of Scottish Folds, cats from Scottish Fold parents can have straight ears. Most straight eared Folds carry the gene for folded ears but because they don't have a pair of genes they do not exhibit folded ears.

If breeding animals you need to breed for the whole animal's soundness. An animal created by breeding is the miniature horse. This animal is genetically a horse but is very small. They were created by breeding for a single trait (small size) and the resulting 'breed' is very unhealthy in many other ways.

This is why if you have an animal you are showing but she misses the Best In Show mark because the show ring requires a tighter angle between the upper and lower thigh bones (German Shepherd for example) then the animal you have. When you breed your dog you will try to breed to a stud who shows in his offspring a consistant but tighter angle betwen the thigh bones. Now, if you breed for this single thing, ignoring the other traits this stud passes on you could be in trouble.. or causing trouble in your litters. As an example, if the stud passes on a very correct thigh angle but also passes on a roach back or a narrow chest, you would be wise to move on to a different stud that exhibits a more sound phenotype consistantly OVERALL in his offspring.

Breeding animals is fascinating but should never be entered into lightly. This is why BYB's are not good for a breed of dog, cat or any other species.
 

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Omg that's horrible! Why wouldn't there be health testing for cats?...:( no wonder these mutations keep popping up.

EDIT:


Okay good there are health test. :D

EDIT...once again:

Oh and that's exactly why this twisty cat thing is popping up. They're breeding two abnormal cats together and that's why a mutation like this showed up. They shouldn't even be breeding Poly cats...obviously if you breed cats with something abnormal like extra toes eventually your going to have something worse pop up.

I should have said health testing in the sense of what dog breeders have available.

As far as Poly cats, no it doesn't mean that a bad mutation will pop up, however IF a mutation such as this DOES occur on a regular basis with a certain breeding that breeding should be discontinued, Any offspring should be sterilized and possibly the parents too.

Here's more info on Polydactylism and the reason it's 'encouraged' in some breeds (it creates a wider foot that is called a 'snowshoe')
http://www.manhattancats.com/Articles/polydactylism.html
 

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thanks for the link to the artical Carla. Very interesting and answers the question of genetics for polydactylism.. it is a dominant trait.

I agree... dogs have a lot more tests available than do cats. I hit on the high points for cats.. but if you go to a cat show and see what is winning... you will see that some genetic abnormalities seem to be encouraged (like the hairless sphinx cat).

I might try a show cat again.. CFA neuter (premier classes). It was fun to go to the shows with a cat that loved being the center of attention. If I ever had a cattery again I would do that differently and I would choose a different breed.. Abysinnian I think.. and keep it very very small. My problem is that I tend to want to breed for strong and healthy individuals and sometimes the extremes of the show ring don't support that.

Of course, I was that way when I bred my dairy cows and the horses.. it was far more important to me to have a sound animal taht would live for years than a typey or flashy animal that had an unsoundness (or potential for one).

As I said b4.. breeding animals is not for the faint of heart and is certainly not for anyone who isn't really concerend about improving the individual animal they have and the breed soundness as a whole. My objections (shared by mnay on this forum) to the BYB of dogs is that they often do what is convenient (the dog down the road or next door) instead of what is sound.. and breeding sound animals is an expensive and time consuming undertaking.

Breeding FOR a genetic deformity, be it twisty cats or hairlessness or extra toes or extremes of size is just doesn't feel good to me.
 

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thanks for the link to the artical Carla. Very interesting and answers the question of genetics for polydactylism.. it is a dominant trait.

I agree... dogs have a lot more tests available than do cats. I hit on the high points for cats.. but if you go to a cat show and see what is winning... you will see that some genetic abnormalities seem to be encouraged (like the hairless sphinx cat).

I might try a show cat again.. CFA neuter (premier classes). It was fun to go to the shows with a cat that loved being the center of attention. If I ever had a cattery again I would do that differently and I would choose a different breed.. Abysinnian I think.. and keep it very very small. My problem is that I tend to want to breed for strong and healthy individuals and sometimes the extremes of the show ring don't support that.

Of course, I was that way when I bred my dairy cows and the horses.. it was far more important to me to have a sound animal taht would live for years than a typey or flashy animal that had an unsoundness (or potential for one).

As I said b4.. breeding animals is not for the faint of heart and is certainly not for anyone who isn't really concerend about improving the individual animal they have and the breed soundness as a whole. My objections (shared by mnay on this forum) to the BYB of dogs is that they often do what is convenient (the dog down the road or next door) instead of what is sound.. and breeding sound animals is an expensive and time consuming undertaking.

Breeding FOR a genetic deformity, be it twisty cats or hairlessness or extra toes or extremes of size is just doesn't feel good to me.

Try Pixie Bobs or American Bobs! They're a newer breed (though Pixies are not CFA recognized due to the possibility of 'wild' blood) with a dominant gene for a short tail. I don't think they havethe problem of the Japanese bob as they originated from the manx types. With Pixies a 1/4 tail is preferred (naturally occuring of course NO docking is allowed).
 

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If I were to show cats again and do any of this, I would (again) choose a breed for its social qualities as well as unusually high intelligence. Shaded Silver America Shorthair cats are not like other AMerican shorthairs... at least not in my experience. It is very difficult to get the round face and the shorter nose with a good stop for the show ring. The interesting thing about the Shadeds I had was their unitque bonding to each other and to me.

Abyssinians and Siamese are failry ancient breeds and they hve developed unique social qualities I find intriguing... Siamese like to be up high and vocalize a lot. Abys think they ought to help you with everything you do.. from brushing your teeth to drving the car. Both breeds are highly social and very intelligent.

I would have to spend time with Pixie Bobs or American Bobs... I very much like Japanese bobs.. their kinked and shortened tail is normal for them... they are very much like American Shorthair in body type.

All this is a ways off. I have 5 rescue cats now and they are keeping me busy! Plus I have Atka who helps take care of them... and ultimately the buck stops (literally) with me! :)
 

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LOL, then you'd LOVE Pixies, they are almost dog like. They love to follow you around and will gladly investigate and demand attention from anybody that enters their territory. They do have a larger body type along the same size as a Maine Coon. Pixies have the wild look of a Bengal with amuch more docile character that's not as prone to temperment issues.
 

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I just looked up a video on youtube and wow...I think that lady is seriously insane. I don't understand why you would breed a cat, or anything, purposefully that has basically a physical handicap, that really says a lot about her personality I think...
 

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To my knowlege there is no health testing for cats.
I think some of the larger breeds (Maine Coon etc.) need to be tested for heart defects. I'm not sure of the details.

I'm iffy on cat breeding anyway. Most purebreds serve no purpose, and wouldn't survive 2 hours if they ended up being dumped on a farm (Persians are the worst---no survival instinct, and they mat so bad they can't walk...if they manage to survive). Some of the more "natural" purebreds are nice. I love Pixiebobs and Ragdolls.

Yep, Japanese Bobtails are totally natural. I lived in Japan when I was a kid, and most of the strays are bobtailed. My mom thought the farmers docked them or something, but, if you feel their tails, they have all the normal vertebrae, they're just bunched up into a bob. Not straight like a docked-tail dog. One of the cats we brought with us has a semi-bobbed tail. Just the end is all bunched up, so her tail looks shorter than normal.
 

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Depends on the breed... Abysinnians can still hunt as can Siamese and the off shoots of those breeds (Balinese, Somali etc.). American shorthairs are actually based on their ability to hunt and look and act like 'normal' cats.

Showing and breeding cats is a real specialty. As I said, I did it for a few years. Again, I would not breed Sphynx or any other breed that is extreme in type and the result of an obvious effort to promote a serious gentic defect (like hairlessness, twisted front legs, etc.).

I prefer the older breeds.. the Abysinnian and Siamese etc. I liked the Shaded Silver American Shorthairs but it was difficult to get any that were typy enough for the show ring and they are difficult in other ways. They form strong bonds with their owners and if separated from them (at least the lines I had) they will stop eating and drinking and die (or try to). I never had such a bunch of loyal cats.. to each other and to their owners. They were amazing as well as difficult. If you kept a kitten to a year old, you had that cat for its life. I had two returned to me for failure to thrive in a new environment. They were sociable and they went to shows, but they fully expected to live with me in my house and new homes did not cut it.

You know tho.. when you think of show cats and think they would not survive two hours if dumped on a farm.. I can tell you MOST house cats won't survive very long if dumped on a farm. I had a farm and had many cats dumped on me and some made it. Many I found after they crawled off somewhere and hid in terror until death relieved them of their suffering.

And, in all reality, an awful lot of dogs would never make it if dumped.. and there are a number of pure bred dogs in the same boat as Persians who could not make it w/o humans.. regardless of health testing and the rest (and many of these pure breds are so far removed from what they were bred for they couldn't function doing those jobs anymore either). NOT to say I do not like pure bred dogs. I do and I have one.

I think the best thing is to understand that domestic animals are what they are and the word "domestic" indicates they need our care.
 

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Yes, of course, in an ideal world. But realistically, around half of cats around here end up on a farm at some point. Purebred or not. And I just think a cat---any cat---should be physically able to survive without constant human intervention (besides feeding etc.). I don't think genetic weaknesses should be propagated.

Yeah, most of my cats wouldn't last on a farm. Well, maybe if they were fed and given a warm place, they'd do OK. But at least they wouldn't get so matted they couldn't see/eat/walk, or freeze to death in 50-degree weather. They're normal cats.

I think purebred cats are bred mainly for looks, and that just doesn't seem right to me. And, although proper cat breeding is "a real specialty", most cat breeders just put a male and a female together and see what happens. A lot of local breeders let their toms wander the farm to breed the farm cats, until they bring him in to breed the purebred ladies. Lots more irresponsible cat breeders than otherwise.
 

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Lots more irresponsible cat breeders than otherwise.
Oh so true and the same for many many animal breeders. We discuss it here at length regarding dogs and the last time I had Quarterhorses there was 1.2 stallions registered for every 2 mares... That meant a lot of studs out there that needed to be snipped if the breeders were more responsible.

IF ANIMAL BREEDERS WERE RESPONSIBLE IT WOULD SOLVE A LOT OF ANIMAL RELATED PROBLEMS. *sigh*

I can say one thing on cats and showing. A cat with a bad disposition will NOT place and can even be ejected from a judge's ring. I remember a Russion Blue at one show.. a truly lovely example of the breed.. except for his disposition which can best be described as "Moody..." Well he got his championship but he never Granded. He slashed a couple of judges that I saw and got ejected.. and he just could never get the points to get his Grand. He had the type but his temperment was just awful about 50% of the time. The rest of the time he "tolerated" being handled by the judge. Just an anecdote from cat showing days.. LOL
 

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I had to look up something else last night and there are two health tests for cats. One is for Polycystic Kidney disease and the other is for Cardiomyopathy. There is even a negative registry for both.

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/registers.php

So, health testing cats is for real and does exist. Currently there is a Vaccination Protocol (http://www.cfa.org/articles/health/vaccination-guidelines.html) and this is being used to help track statistics regarding Vaccination Site Specific Carcinoma (an aggressive and usually fatal cancer).
 

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So, health testing cats is for real and does exist. Currently there is a Vaccination Protocol (http://www.cfa.org/articles/health/vaccination-guidelines.html) and this is being used to help track statistics regarding Vaccination Site Specific Carcinoma (an aggressive and usually fatal cancer).

Yep, I know what that is, Pixies are VERY prone to it. We had a scare with Desi right after I got him home, he had a lump where he'd gotten his rabies vaccine (had to have to ship) thankfully the lump went away but I titre him now, he WILL NOT get the vax again unless ABSOLUTELY neccesary.
 
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