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I was working with a rescued basset hound last night. Basically the guy has no manners and I've talked about it here before. I had him out on a leash in my kitchen. A baby gate was keeping him from the rest of the house and I was letting him wander around wherever he wanted and was clicking/treating when he was doing behaviours I liked (like chewing on a toy inside or simply sniffing the ground) and using leash corrections when he started doing behaviors I didn't like (like getting ready to jump on the counter or tip over the trash or get in the dog food). My cocker was following us around the whole time and kept looking at me expectantly. I didn't think anything of it as he normally follows me around in the kitchen. I decided to work with my basset on crating on command. Normally, he's fairly good at it, but recently has suffered a setback for whatever reason. I was getting him to go in the crate, giving the crate command and clicking/treating as he did. I turned around to discover that my cocker was also in his crate looking very confused as to why he was hearing a click, but wasn't getting a treat. It made no sense to him.

How do you train one dog without confusing the second dog? Should I just put the second dog outside while I'm training the first one?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can you crate one dog while training the other?
That's what I did last night after a while, but the cocker still looked confused. I would click and his ears would perk up and he'd turn my direction. I train in my kitchen because it's got hard floors and any food that's dropped is easily cleaned up. The crates are in the same place.
 

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Like rosemaryninja said; crate the other one or somehow seperate another way OR - make it a group training session. Often when I train a new dog I like to have a 'veteran' there to go through the same commands to give the newbie an idea on what's expected. This has worked wonderfully for me over the years and with many dogs. I've seen the new ones start out not sure what is expected but after watching the other one go through the commands the new one followed with no problems. Also, even for one that is well trained it is always good for them to practice even on the most basic of commands. This keeps them at peak performance and it gives them the opportunity to please you all the while teaching the 'new guy'. A win-win situation for everyone. :)

Jihad
and the pound puppy crew.
 
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