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Sorry if this has already been discussed, I couldn't seem to find what I was after..

Anyways, I haven't got my puppy yet, but with my previous dogs and all my friends dogs, the biggest problem in training that we've encountered is when you teach your dog one trick, and then teach them another trick, and whenever you pull out a treat or anything, they offer up all of the tricks in one super quick go. i.e. sit, shake, then lie down really fast.

How do you avoid this happening? Is there a way in which you can make the dog understand to NOT offer up all behaviors in one go like that? And to just wait for the command for each individual trick? I think they just get SO excited for the treat.

I'm just making sure I'm doing it right for when I train my new puppy :)
 

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I would start by taking it slow. The biggest mistake I see people make during trick training is going too fast, especially with a biddable/motivated dog. Teach one behavior and really work on that and solidify it before moving on to the next behavior.

When your dog knows a few commands, you can begin intcorporating them together in a chain, but switch it up. Don't always do 'sit, down' stand' because the dog will begin to anticipate the cue. Also when chaining commands, don't do it rapid fire. Give the dog a few seconds between each successful cue to perform the next one.

If the dog is throwing behaviors at you, that is great! However, you need to only reward the behaviors you want to reinforce.
 

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Just an amateur pet owner here, but I personally like it when my dog throws a lot of tricks trying to figure out what I want. Shows me she's thinking hard and that I have her attention. I ignore it and wait until she's calmed down enough to listen. Then I ask for the behavior I want. Over time, she's learned that it's best to just plop right into a sit or a down/stay and wait for the command. She still throws tricks sometimes for really high value stuff like steak, but mostly knows to calm down and wait now.
 

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Condition a no reward marker.

Pick a word or phrase such as nope, too bad, bummer and use it each time the dog gives you the behavior you are NOT looking for and hold out on the reward.

So if I tell my dog down and she bows, I say nope, and she tries to find the right behavior to get the reward. A reward marker says,"This is the exact behavior that earned you a reward." A no reward marker says,"This behavior will not earn you a reward."

Make sense?

If you keep giving the cue for 'down' and the dog is giving you a 'bow' despite your no reward markers, you need to back track and make sure that there's no cue confusion.
 

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I don't show them the treat while training. I want my dog to work for me, not the food. The food is just a happy bonus. It works quite well for us!
 

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I don't quite understand why it matters, as long as when you give a command the dog does it? My dogs will usually wait for a command everywhere except the bedroom, because in the bedroom we do a lot of shaping. Or if I've brought the clicker out anywhere else, they know it's on. But other than that they don't offer much, occasionally they will offer sits or shakes, but not usually.

I also don't show them treats when I'm about to ask them to do something. Obviously if they've seen me grab the clicker they know I have treats, but for the rest of the time when I just need them to sit and stay somewhere or go to their bed, they don't know if I have a treat or not. Usually I don't, but if they do as I ask I will run with them to the kitchen to get them a treat.

And if I do have a treat and they know I have it and they're offering stuff and I don't want them to offer anything, I just don't reward it. If the treat isn't for them they get nothing and give up, and if I got it for them I will ask them to do something, and they will do it.

I think maybe if your dog is offering everything every time it knows you have a treat, either you have been rewarding that in the past, or the dog doesn't actually know what you want yet.
 
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