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Discussion Starter #1
Many threads start with a heading much like that. I have opened many threads from either people with a first time dog or someone that has experience with dogs but seemingly is looking for advice or affirmation on their way of training. There are also those that start a thread just looking to start a fight with others that might have different ideas of training.
I was just thinking how much fun it would be to have different people on this forum deal with my dogs on different situations and get opinions on how they would deal with certain behaviors. In one of my training classes one of the exercises was to put your dog in a sit stay walk to the dog in front or maybe the third dog up, take control of that dog and go through a series of exercises with the strange new dog. Obviously not everyone was happy or comfortable to work with my dogs and I sort of secretly thought it funny. Inga when she was in her prime would take full advantage of that situation. She had a sense of humor and would use it to the fullest. Here we have people that are always giving training advice and I wonder how many of them would feel comfortable with just any dog? Would breed or size matter? How much experience do some of these advice givers have? I mean, training is training, that is true but each dog is different. Breed does sort of make a difference in how you might approach a problem. How many of you feel completely comfortable with every breed of dog? How many of you have experience with more then say 15 breeds of dog? I don't mean just meeting a few or playing with a few at a humane society. I mean hands on training 15 different breeds of dog? Do you approach all of them the same? Are any of you in a class where the trainer encourages you to work with other peoples dogs to make YOU a better trainer? How many of you are truly OPEN to new ideas and manners of training? How many will do anything it takes to train or rehabilitate a dog that has some issues? Just curious, I would love to hear from everyone. :)
 

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i have worked w/ numerous breeds of dogs (and many w/ numerous breeds in them)and i can't really say that there is one particular breed that i would have difficulty working w/.....the breeds that i'm not as familiar w/ (like alot of the giant breeds and newer ones) i'd have to "get a feel for" but i wouldn't have a problem working w/ them....i don't approach any dog the same way w/ training b/c even in the same breed there are so many differences in personality/temperment/sensitivity that they need to be worked w/ one an individual basis.....all 5 of my BC's are so different that the training method is different (Tir you have to demand it...not get forceful, but don't take her attitude, if you don't she thinks you're soft; Lacey--explain what you want and she'll bend over backwards to comply; Titch--total guidance....get demanding w/ him and he shuts down; Saoirse--she's such a ditz...everything is a game to her and it's hard to get thru that nature; Kody is soooo soft that the slightest sharp tone and he runs for cover).....

but,if i were in a class w/ you Inga and we did that, i'd take one of your Rotties in a heart beat.....
 

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I work at a dog daycare and work with many breeds there. I also assist a trainer in class and help people with their dogs there, often showing them what to do with their dog and then handing the dog back to them. When he (the trainer) was working the humane society many of the dogs in the basic class had aggression problems and where there on mandatory obedience. I also get to help out with schutzhund training and hope to get my own dog to compete with in the next year or two.

At work we have beagles, labs, airedale terriers, wheaton terriers, an irish terrier, cane corsos, bull mastiffs, pit bulls, a sharpei, a sharpei pit mix (one of my favorite dogs there), golden retrievers, a boerboel, coon hounds, a fox hound, boston terriers, papillions, dachshunds, a bendlington terrier, belgian malinois, did I mention labs?, various "doodles", many mixed breed dogs, border collies, a great dane mix that comes, dobermans, bouviers, various spaniels, several corgis, rotties, huskies, many german shepherds, mountain dogs, giant schnauzers, mini schnauzers . . . and more breeds and breed mixes. We get a lot of dogs referred to us to help with socialization and aggression problems and many of the owners bring their dogs because they are having behavioral problems and hope to tire them out. We work with the dogs while they are there so they at least behave at the daycare.

When I got both my dogs they had behavioral issues. Lloyd bit me a few times when we first got him, now he is a wonderful dog and companion and I can take him anywhere. Allie had lots and lots of problems when we got her. I couldn't walk her down the street without her flipping out. She was very sick, had to spend lots of money to get her well. The first month or two we had her she did not leave the house without a muzzle. She is also much better. I can walk her down the street without her flipping out because another dog is there; without her going after skate boarders, bikes, joggers. I can take her to work with me and she will actually play with some of the other dogs. She has to take prozac every morning, but a low dose. We are contemplating weaning her off of it now that she has a lot of behavioral mod training done.
 

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There is a Rottie (pick your own breed) that acts like a Chihuaha (pick your own breed) and vice versa. It's not the breed in the dog it's the dog in the breed. As many of you have read before, 90 breeds trained and biggest difference I have found is the way they look. I know this sounds like an over simplification because of breeds built to do different things/work etc. With straight basic Obedience work this is the way I see it. If it's got 4 legs/head/tail not a big deal.
 

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I'm with Wvasco! I look at the dog before doing anything. Is the dog scared, stressed, ready to take flight or bold and bubbly....ready to play. That determines how we're going to approach the training....not the breed.
 

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I don't think breed, is the most important thing in training (while it is still important)

But all the methods, as different as they may seem from other methods... all have the same roots at the end.

Having put into thought what you said about knowing 15 breeds, train them, etc.. which i think would be impossible for someone to succesfully train 15 different breeds in a normal lifetime, because in my own opinion, you'd have to own those 15 breeds for at least 5 years each to claim you have experience with the breed. (again.. only my point of view, i don't know how much time you need to have experience with a breed) Plus, as you say.. Dogs are so different within their breeds! You would need to meet, train, own 3 dogs of the same breed to see different behaviours on each dog of the same breed.

I think dog training is kinda like Trail and error, if it doesn't work, look for another method, and so on, and so on, in the end, it HAS to work if done properly.

I'd hate to see in the internet, or yellow Pages ''Rottweiler Trainer, Foxhound Trainer, Basset Hound trainer, Husky Trainer, Old English Sheepdog trainer, GSD Trainer''
 

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Before I went to Canada Wet Canine Centre I'd mostly worked with my own dog and those were all lab crosses or border collie croses (and one Chihuahua when I was seven but I never really trained her anything). So I'd motly worked with medium sized, goofy, hyper dogs. Floyd (my intructor) had asked us what types of dogs we'd worked with, at the begining of the course, so he knew what my experience was. Because of this, he made me work with a little poodle + Shih tzu, and a big Great Dane for a good chunk of the course :p I've always said I was a big dog person, that I'm not a fan of little dogs... after working with those dogs I actually have a kind of respect for the little ones now and am still a bit nervous around the giant ones.

I've only been training professionally for a year now, but what a year it has been. In the past year I've worked with little dog, big dogs, puppies, old dog, young dog, and many breeds I've never worked with or even met before!

I'd like to think that no dog is too big of a case for me, or that I wouldn't turn anyone down. If I come across a question or problem I don't know the answer to I tell the owners I'll get back to them on it and then I spend the next week before I see them again researching it. However, if I came across something I felt was too big of a problem, would be dangerous for me to try, or if I knew I could end up hurting the dog more than helping it in the end due to my inexperience I would tell the owners that I will help in any way I can but that specific problem I can't help them with. Luckily, I haven't come across such scenario yet.

I do have a certain method of training but I don't ever seem to use the same exact method with every single dog. I tailor it to fit the dog's individual peronality, and if that mean using a totally different method of training, that's what I'll do. For instance, I'm not big on treat training in formal obedience, I'm sure I've debated this topic a few times here already, but just last month I came acros a dog who wasn't excited about any reward except food. I caved and the dog was given treat rewards. I like to train a dog in the easiest way for the dog, which may not always be the easiest way for me :p
 

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Interesting question. I'll fess that I have limited experience - just my own, family member, and neighborhood dogs. I would love to gain a lot more experience, though. One of the most enjoyable classes we took included time training other members' dogs. It really teaches you where you're going wrong since the new dog doesn't know you and can't read you as readily as your own dog. That eyebrow twitch merely looks weird to the new dog and is not a "speak" cue (yes, god help me, I've trained my dog to speak with an eyebrow twitch - I didn't say I was a smart dog trainer after all). So you have to learn to be precise and consistent. I learned it's a lot harder to do than I thought it would be. Thank goodness my own dog is very forgiving!
 

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I was just thinking how much fun it would be to have different people on this forum deal with my dogs on different situations and get opinions on how they would deal with certain behaviors
That would be interesting. Generally, when I meet some of my friends' dogs for the first time, I'm trying to see if we have success communicating with each other and how open they are to being friendly. My experience is also limited to the dogs I have owned, mostly northern breeds are my favourite, friends, family, and neighbors dogs.

I work with "training" children and have the classic behavioural model and various brain theories going on in my mind constantly. These seem to spill over to training my dogs though I sometimes feel I have more to learn with Ilya... he has issues I haven't delt with before and I wonder sometimes here at DF, what others have tried for similar issues.
 

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Our local Humane Society doesn't rescue dogs, instead they offer training as the service to the community. I volunteer there once a week to train the puppy owners and the advanced dog owners, with a full range of Heinz-57and one exercise is exactly what you suggested - trading dogs. Now, it is a little easier because these dogs have been through 6 - 12 months of training already, so they've been socialized pretty well, and understand the basic cues. But there are clear differences.

For example, I personally have trouble keeping track of the high-energy terriers. I've always had large dogs, so that's not an issue, until they get too hot and sit down... I also have a little trouble with the small breeds, trying to remember that they have short legs. And, every once in a while, I'll let two playmates get too close, not realizing that they've been waiting for the chance to start play fighting. The owners know these things and anticipate it... but even with experience with a wide variety of dogs, I still get caught.

BTW, I've taught my dog international handsignals. However, when I'm talking with someone, I gesture, like many people ... and my dog has learned to respond to my 'unconscious' gestures. It's funny when he tries to respond to the similar gestures that other people make... that mean something different.

- Hank Simon
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I always tell people that have training experience to go to the local humane societies and volunteer some time. Teaching some of the simple basic behaviors can get a dog placed that might not have had a chance. People are impressed with a dog that can "sit" on command and does not pull on a leash. These are both relatively easy to teach and can help a dog find a new start. Hint Hint. :)
That said, it is also a great place to expand your experiences with other breeds and types of dogs. All dogs have different personalities. All of my dogs have been very different even though they have all but one, been Rottweilers. All of my dogs have also been much the same compared to other breeds of dogs I ran into. I enjoy the challenge of working with all different types of dog but I also know that I prefer dogs with quite a bit of drive. I am also a big fan of a dog with a great sense of humor. Another reason I have been stuck in this breed for 30 years. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Argh can't you break your OP text in some paragraphs? Was a little pain to read, sorry
LOL Sorry. I was so stinking tired when I wrote that I am surprised it made any sense at all.
 

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I always tell people that have training experience to go to the local humane societies and volunteer some time. Teaching some of the simple basic behaviors can get a dog placed that might not have had a chance. People are impressed with a dog that can "sit" on command and does not pull on a leash. These are both relatively easy to teach and can help a dog find a new start. Hint Hint. :)
I think this is an excellent idea! I try to work with the Humane Society here as much as possible, but right now it's more 'rounding up dogs' kind of work than actually getting to work with many of them. I'm hoping to be able to do that more once we have an actual building, right now all our dogs and cats are in foster homes and are being sent out of town.

That said, it is also a great place to expand your experiences with other breeds and types of dogs. All dogs have different personalities. All of my dogs have been very different even though they have all but one, been Rottweilers. All of my dogs have also been much the same compared to other breeds of dogs I ran into. I enjoy the challenge of working with all different types of dog but I also know that I prefer dogs with quite a bit of drive. I am also a big fan of a dog with a great sense of humor. Another reason I have been stuck in this breed for 30 years. :)
I love being able to work with all sorts of dogs I wouldn't otherwise work with if I just worked with my own dogs. (I hope that made sense). However, just because I like to work with all sorts doesn't mean I like to own them! It sounds like the Rottie would be perfect for me, as I too love a dog with a good sense of humour and high drive! However, I'm thinking, although this could change as it will be many years from now, my next dog will be something like a Bassett lol I think I'm guna need a break from these crazy dogs for a while, I'm starting to run out of energy with them!
 
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