Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Check the label first for the AAFCO nutritional adequacy statement, which indicates the food provides complete and balanced nutrition. It should also include the life stage for which the food is appropriate. Life stages include growth (appropriate for puppies), adult maintenance, gestation/lactation, senior (appropriate for older dogs), and “all life stages.” A food labeled for all life stages can be used throughout a dog’s life, from weaning through adulthood.

When choosing a food, look for one that fits your pet’s flavor preferences, lifestyle, medical conditions, and environment, says Susan Wynn, DVM, AHG, a nutritionist for Georgia Veterinary Specialists in the Atlanta area and a clinical resident in small animal nutrition with the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.

Use the food for six to eight weeks to see how it affects your dog, says Wakshlag, who accepts some research funding from a major pet food manufacturer. Good signs: A shiny coat and a pet that looks healthy. If the dog is producing a large volume of stools or develops diarrhea, he may have problems digesting a food. If a dog has skin, ear, joint, or other problems, try another food to see if there’s a connection, Wynn says.

“What’s great for one dog may not adequately support another,” she says. “It’s important to try a wide variety of diets to find the optimum.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
and you never educate yourself on ingredients or read the ingredient list? thats a poor way to decide on a food. at this rate i could feed Ol Roy.....
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top