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Just being back from Sam's second agility class and wondering how humans train for doing their part. Any tips for a middle aged, slightly over weight women :doh: ? Sam is doing fine, but I barely make it to the end of the tunnel before him in order to point him to the next obstacle ... SY
 

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A lot of it's practice. Your coordination improves.. you get better. If your dog is faster than you.. taking up jogging can help. I joined the runnign room 2 summers ago and took a learn to run class. Helped some of my out of breath agility woes.. And I can run both my dogs with very few in between now..
 

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Just being back from Sam's second agility class and wondering how humans train for doing their part. Any tips for a middle aged, slightly over weight women ? Sam is doing fine, but I barely make it to the end of the tunnel before him in order to point him to the next obstacle ... SY
I feel your pain! Teach your dog to work away from you. Work on "sends" and directionals. Work on long lead outs and lateral lead outs. You can cut out steps by having good handling skills. It will come in time.
 

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Ah, the million dollar question. Probably 90% of the members of my agility club are middle aged women (some of whom are overweight). I'm the baby at 26, and they call me "twinkle toes". My dog's fast, but as my handling skills improve, more often than not, I beat her. Trial photographers hate me, cause I'm always in their pictures when they're trying to get my dog.

A few suggestions:
1) Get some really good shoes that you'll use specifically for agility. Look for something lightweight, but with traction. Around here, the favorite brand is Innovate. They aren't stylish, but man do they work! I love mine. As an added bonus, your feet don't hurt at the end of a long weekend of trialing.
2) As Cavalier says, the longer you're in it, the easier it will get. The dog will learn to work at a greater distance away from you, and you'll learn how to make the most of every step. Your dog will learn to take verbal cues and body language cues instead of needing you to be there to indicate every obstacle. Work on this!
3) If you're up for it, try to become more active. Exercise will benefit you and the dog.
 

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Thanks everybody for your suggestions ;-) We do, at least at the moment agility just for fun and bonding, no trials in the near future. I feared to hear that jogging will be on my to do list soon ;-) Anybody here uses a jogging belt for running with their dog? And if yes, how good can you keep your balance if the dog suddenly changes direction (bird, squirrel, feral cat etc)? As for fitness, I already lost 15kg/30lbs+ in the 6months we had Sam and it is getting better every day! SY
 

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Way to go Sybille. Nothing like a dog wanting a walk, to help with getting in shape. Still working on it myself, and we have had Ginny for a year now.
 

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Way to go Sybille. Nothing like a dog wanting a walk, to help with getting in shape. Still working on it myself, and we have had Ginny for a year now.
Lol, nothing like a young Labrador mix in the house that DIDN'T had his workout the previous day. :yield:
 

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Thanks everybody for your suggestions ;-) We do, at least at the moment agility just for fun and bonding, no trials in the near future. I feared to hear that jogging will be on my to do list soon ;-) Anybody here uses a jogging belt for running with their dog? And if yes, how good can you keep your balance if the dog suddenly changes direction (bird, squirrel, feral cat etc)? As for fitness, I already lost 15kg/30lbs+ in the 6months we had Sam and it is getting better every day! SY
Wow, congrats on the weight loss!

There are quite a few women in their 50s and 60s that do agility here, a few of whom are a little overweight. Most can't keep up with their dog even if they aren't overweight. In time you'll be able to use some of the shortcuts listed above by other users. I see many successful runs with a handler that can't run, limps a little, is overweight, I have ever seen a handler with only one leg who used crutches. When you don't have to run right next to your dog it makes a big difference! It of course takes practice and training to teach the dog what you want when you say/do a certain thing. I'm not sure if this one was mentioned, but contact obstacles can be a good place to teach your dog to stop and wait for you. If you use the 2o/2o method (back two feet on the obstacle contact zone, front paws on the ground) and teach them to hold it then they will wait until you release them. It's a good pause to let you catch up.
 
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