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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm keeping a dog for my friend for about a month, and then she's going back to his house (which is in another city). She stays outside in the yard because my parents don't want her to come into the house (they're afraid of dogs).

This has worked out fine (she's a great dog!), but it's getting cold outside now. At night, she stays in the garage, where there is no wind, and the temperature is a good 10° warmer. But I know it will get colder in a few weeks.

I've read that Siberian Huskies can tolerate temperatures of -10° F. Firstly, is this true? Secondly, what is their "comfort" threshold (I'm guessing "tolerating" -10° is not the same as liking it)? I'm in North-Western Ohio, and temperatures will likely never reach that extreme low (the average low here is about 27°, although this year could be a bit colder).

If there is no extreme weather, like snowstorms and high-velocity winds, could this Siberian Husky stay outside? Please note that I don't mean at night, since she stays in the warmer garage then.

Edit: Also, could someone tell me how other breeds of dog are in handling the cold weather? We're thinking about getting a dog, and it probably won't be a Husky (she's a really crazy dog). I heard German Shepards were also bred for cold weather, is this true? Thanks.
 

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For just a month, and the dog's in the garage at night? Should be fine. My malamute/collie mix liked to stay outside unless the temp hit -15C/5F (and he actually came in reluctantly even at that temp; he was always too hot indoors and would find a cooler tile floor to lie on). He rarely even wanted to use his doghouse -- he was happy to curl up in a ball in a snowbank. Just keep an eye on the dog. If it's too cold, you'll be able to tell, as the dog will cry or lift its feet a lot. If possible, it would be a nice idea to grab one of those igloo doghouses or something just so the dog has some shelter. And make sure the dog always has unfrozen water to drink.
 

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She'd need a doghouse, or you might get cited for neglect.

Huskies do like the cold but their tolerance level depends on a lot of factors like how conditioned they are, the quality of ttheir coat, the weather conditions, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thank you both for your answers.

Like I said, The temperature never gets that low here. If it reaches 10° F, that's considered a cold winter. She grew a really thick coat in the fall, but I don't know how it compares to other dogs. I'm not sure how much you can tell from a picture, but here's one:



As for conditioning, this will be her first winter, so she's definitely not used to the weather.
 

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Is your friend aware that you are keeping their dog outside/in a garage? Given that it doesn't seem to get that cold I would imagine the dog would be fine (if not a little stressed if not used to the temporary living conditions). I would get her some kind of shelter to be able to go in while outside though, in case of weather and to avoid situations with animal control (not sure what the laws are there but here the dog must have 24/7 access to a shelter. Even if you could leave the grarge door open just enough for her to go in and out. Personally I'd never do it, while one of mine could likely stay outside and doesn't mind weather I would never allow one of mine to stay with someone where the dog would not be allowed into the house when the dog is not used to it, no matter the breed. There are too many bad things that can happen, plus I don't feel it is fair, espeically for breeds that are very family oriented and need to be with their human.

Why would you consider getting a dog when your parents are afraid of dogs? Doesn't seem like a good idea at all to me. And I'd definately not get a German Shepherd if you plan to have it as an outdoor dog. Not because they couldn't handle those temperatures but because they are such intelligent dogs, many with high prey drives. When they get bored they get destructive. They are very people oriented dogs and generally don't thrive when kept as outdoor dogs. This goes with many breeds.
 

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Aww, she's beautiful.

Will the friend/dog's owner pay for a doghouse? A doghouse with some straw in it would provide some shelter and help keep the dog warm. How long has she been with you so far? She will probably get used to the cold as the temperature gradually drops, and I doubt it will get too cold for her in the next month. Just get her some kind of shelter (as Willowy and Two Leashes said, it's legally required), make sure she always has water, take her for lots of walks, and put her in the garage at night and if the temperature drops a lot on any given day. Keep a good eye on her and make sure she seems comfortable and happy.

I also don't think you should get a dog if it will have to live permanently outside. Wait until you no longer live with your parents.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, my friend is aware. He says it's fine, but I wanted to make sure here. So I'm starting to understand that I need to get some form of shelter for her. I'll look into dog houses.

As for getting my own, it's really not for sure at all. I know my parents not being okay with an indoor dog is an... "obstacle", shall we say? I was just curious as to how it would work if I tried it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think so too, and I envy my friend! He might pay for a dog house, but I could probably get a good deal myself by looking through Craigslist.

I do all the things you mentioned, except for the doghouse, so I better go look for one.

So when I can afford all my living expenses plus tuition, I'll get a dog. I had hoped for one sooner, but what can you do?
 

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So when I can afford all my living expenses plus tuition, I'll get a dog. I had hoped for one sooner, but what can you do?
You can volunteer at shelters in the mean time ;D
Really, it would help you get a lot of experience working with dogs and you'd be doing a good thing.

As someone who has an outside dog because of parental reasons, it sucks, let me tell you. My dog likes it outside, hates it inside, but it still sucks on my end. Seems like life's a lot harder having an outdoor dog compared to having an indoor dog.

As for this dog, she should be fine. Like others said, as long as she has appropriate shelter for when she's outside, then when she comes in as long as she had a good bed she should be able to weather the next month.
 

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Physically I'm sure she'll be fine, the dog house is a good idea. However, try to make an effort to give her some attention and play with her as often as possible. Dogs are social animals and staying out in the yard for a month is going to be hard on her and pretty depressing.

Definitely wait until you move out before you get a dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Physically I'm sure she'll be fine, the dog house is a good idea. However, try to make an effort to give her some attention and play with her as often as possible. Dogs are social animals and staying out in the yard for a month is going to be hard on her and pretty depressing.

Definitely wait until you move out before you get a dog.
My siblings and I play with her all the time. It's not really a huge effort, since we enjoy it. She seems very happy and excited when we go out to play with her.
 

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Firstly, what an absolutely gorgeous dog!

As a breed, huskies are about as cold-tolerant as it gets. Of course, individuals within breeds vary hugely, but generally they do pretty well living in cold climes. They do it here, they do it in the arctic circle; I'm sure they can do it in Ohio.

Any breed with a double coat should be fine in Ohio as a mostly-outside dog (although I would consider bringing the dog in the house if it starts getting down to 0F). Most spitz-type dogs would be okay. If you are okay with an indoor-dog when you move out, you could probably get any breed as long as you had the right equipment (coat/sweaters and booties), but if you're set on getting a dog before you move out, most dogs with a double coat would do well, larger dogs especially as they don't lose heat as quickly as smaller dogs. But, I agree with Jenness - I'd wait until you move out before getting a dog.
 

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Here in Alaska you can keep a dog outside but by law you must have shelter and water available ( even if the dog never goes in the dog house like mine ).The mushers
have what we call dog lots where they keep the sled dogs, each dog has a tie out and shelter and they can have dozens of dogs ( Mainly Alaskan huskies) they are caring for and training. As far as a dog house the mot simple things work, one lot i live by uses empty 50 gal drums with straw, alot of them use just a wooden box a flap for a door made out an old rug and straw in it .

For water you have to get the water dish that is heated if its going to freeze but you might be ok on that unless the temps get very very cold .
 
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