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The foster basset I had a few weeks ago and I reached an agreement. It was cold outside and he didn't want to be out there. He would go outside and immediately pee on the first place he found. Then I'd let him back in. It was a beautiful thing. My Spaniel I've got doesn't seem to grasp this agreement at all. He will go out the door on command, but once he gets there, no matter how cold it is he will turn around and stare at me through the glass. He has no interest in relieving himself even if it's 20 degrees outside. I tried for the past 3-4 days to go out with him and as soon as he peed we made a bee line for the door like it was a big deal. I wanted him to associate peeing with going inside. Today I have a massive headache. He will go out the door, but refuses to pee outside instead he sits there in the cold staring at me waiting for me to let him in. I'd be glad to let him in, but since his last potty break was at 6 pm I don't think he wants to try holding it until 6 am and I don't want to get up in the middle of the night to let his doggy butt out. If I didn't know better I'd swear he's doing this to tick me off. The massive migraine doesn't make it any better.
 

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Sadly, I can't be of much help. I don't send Wally out without me, so I know if I did that - he'd do the exact same thing (except he'll start whining and moaning after a while, then barking - he USED to sit there in silence, then I taught him to let me know if he's stuck)

The only way I could think of to train Wally to do this if I wanted to would be to send him out and immediately tell him "go potty". If he peed/pooped/both he'd get a treat. Otherwise, he'd stay out there until he does. Then we he does, I'd let him in.

That might build that association you're looking for (to get back in, you need to do your business).

Don't know how well that would work. Wally MIGHT would get it, eventually, since he'd probably want to get back inside with me (or me to come out).
 

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You can actually teach a dog to pee on cue, but it takes a while.

Using the capture method and clicker training, or any sort of positive reinforcement, you take the dog out when and where you know he is most likely to pee. Keeping the pup on leash, stand quietly and wait. Do not engage the pup or do anything entertaining. Just wait. Eventually, the pup should squat and pee. When he does, say "go potty" or whatever term you want to use as the command and praise WHILE he is going. When he's done you can give him a treat or toss him a ball, or take him for a walk. This is the single place where most folks fail. You must, absolutely MUST, give your command, praise & reward heavily each and every time the puppy pees for however long it takes (figure 8 weeks, minimum, and 6 months is more reasonable) whenever they pee appropriately. It means you don't just open the door and let them out to "do their business," but that you take them out on a leash and monitor them so that you can reward approproiately. After you've done this very consistantly for 8-12 weeks, try giving the command when you know your pup has to pee. If they produce, FANTASTIC- throw a party. If they don't, resist the urge to say it more than once, and go another 4-5 weeks before you try cueing the behavior again. (You want to make very sure you don't associate the cue with any behavior OTHER than pottying, so resist the urge to try until you've got a very strong history of this cue being associated with a specific behavior and major treats.) In addition to this, you need ot prevent the pup from eliminating INAPPROPRIATELY- without the cue. So that means you need to give the pup MANY opportunities to get it right and be very alert to signs (circling, sniffing, etc) that the pup might need to pee.

The advantage of htis is that it's really useful when you want to walk your pup someplace that you don't want them peeing (think the outdoor aisle at a pet fair or festival where you don't want them peeing on anyone's stuff but it's still definitely outdoors.) or when you really ARE in a hurry- or you need them to pee someplace strange, like in the city where there's no grass or in a vet's office for a sample.

If this all seems like too much trouble, you can just set up a routine to encourage quick pottying. When you are waiting for the pup to potty, do not play with them, walk around, or otherwise engage them. Pick a spot, stand still, and ignore your puppy. Don't beg, don't talk to her, or engage in any way until she starts to eliminate- then praise while she goes, treat as soon as she's done, and do something super-fun afterwards- go for a walk (even a short one- 5 minutes is plenty. The important thing is that eliminating predicts that she WILL get a walk or play session 99.9% of the time rather than pooping = she goes back to her crate or bed.), play a quick game of ball, or whatever.

It won't work immediately, but it's the best way to teach the habit in th elong run.
 

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My dog does not like to pee or poop in my yard... so can you use the cue while out walking and then try it in the yard when it starts working??? Or do they associate the cue with the area???

Thanks for the feedback!
Mags
 

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My dog does not like to pee or poop in my yard... so can you use the cue while out walking and then try it in the yard when it starts working??? Or do they associate the cue with the area???

Thanks for the feedback!
Mags
Wally will perform the cue where ever we happen to be. I think as long as you give the cue and reward in many places (start with where ever he currently likes to do his business), the dog will get it and do it everywhere you request.

behavior and major treats.) In addition to this, you need ot prevent the pup from eliminating INAPPROPRIATELY- without the cue. So that means you need to give the pup MANY opportunities to get it right and be very alert to signs (circling, sniffing, etc) that the pup might need to pee.
I took this with Wally to exclude any marking/peeing on interesting smelling stuff, etc as well, and use the command to allow him to mark as well. Just another opportunity to teach the command.


The advantage of htis is that it's really useful when you want to walk your pup someplace that you don't want them peeing (think the outdoor aisle at a pet fair or festival where you don't want them peeing on anyone's stuff but it's still definitely outdoors.) or when you really ARE in a hurry- or you need them to pee someplace strange, like in the city where there's no grass or in a vet's office for a sample.
Still working on him peeing off of grass (he still wants to use grass/pile of leaves), but absolutely a great thing :D

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