Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My beagle/pug mutt, Sophie is so smart. She is a problem solver and she knows a LOT of tricks, but she will only do them if she knows shes gonna get a treat. Mostly I want to teach her to come to me when she is called. When she sees something interesting or when she escapes out the fence she ignores me. I call her name and she will turn around and look directly at me them keep on going. I also have chickens and I let them free range sometimes. She has the urge to chase them and she wants to "play" with them and smell them, but as long as I am outside to supervise, she doesn't really go by them as much. Which is kind of wierd because she listens to me then. I just say "Sophie" or "hey, come here" and she leaves them alone and comes to me. But other than that she just ignores me.

One time in particular we went to the mountains (I made sure she had a leash on while we were there). When we were getting read to leave, I put her in the truck and took off her leash. I forgot something so I went to open the door to get it and she bolted out and took off up the mountain and out of sight. I called her name over and over and ran after her to get her. She saw a quad coming and then ran back to the truck. This was extremely dangerous because there were a lot of quads and dirt bikes that were driving fast and recklessly. She could have gotten run over.

I want Sophie to respond to her name and it would be nice if she didn't run off everytime she gets off leash. How can I teach her to come when she is called without me having to always carrying around treats? Especially in emergencies, I can't and won't always have treats in my hand. I want Sophie to be safe and I want to take her more places without me worrying about her to get hurt and running off. I was thinking that I could have like a codeword or a type of whistle or "pss pss!". Also, when she finally does come back I never know whether I should praise her or yell at her. I don't yell at her because I don't want her to think that coming back is bad, but I don't want to praise her for not coming when I call her. What should I do and how can I train her to be more obedient?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
My beagle/pug mutt, Sophie is so smart. She is a problem solver and she knows a LOT of tricks, but she will only do them if she knows shes gonna get a treat. Mostly I want to teach her to come to me when she is called. When she sees something interesting or when she escapes out the fence she ignores me. I call her name and she will turn around and look directly at me them keep on going. I also have chickens and I let them free range sometimes. She has the urge to chase them and she wants to "play" with them and smell them, but as long as I am outside to supervise, she doesn't really go by them as much. Which is kind of wierd because she listens to me then. I just say "Sophie" or "hey, come here" and she leaves them alone and comes to me. But other than that she just ignores me.

One time in particular we went to the mountains (I made sure she had a leash on while we were there). When we were getting read to leave, I put her in the truck and took off her leash. I forgot something so I went to open the door to get it and she bolted out and took off up the mountain and out of sight. I called her name over and over and ran after her to get her. She saw a quad coming and then ran back to the truck. This was extremely dangerous because there were a lot of quads and dirt bikes that were driving fast and recklessly. She could have gotten run over.

I want Sophie to respond to her name and it would be nice if she didn't run off everytime she gets off leash. How can I teach her to come when she is called without me having to always carrying around treats? Especially in emergencies, I can't and won't always have treats in my hand. I want Sophie to be safe and I want to take her more places without me worrying about her to get hurt and running off. I was thinking that I could have like a codeword or a type of whistle or "pss pss!". Also, when she finally does come back I never know whether I should praise her or yell at her. I don't yell at her because I don't want her to think that coming back is bad, but I don't want to praise her for not coming when I call her. What should I do and how can I train her to be more obedient?
When you have a treat, do you "bribe" her with it (show it to her, wave it around, etc?) If so, stop doing that :) A behavior (come when called) should make the reward (food) appear; a reward (food) shouldn't make the behavior appear. Know what I mean?
Victoria Stillwell (on It's Me or the Dog) "loads" a whistle by blowing the whistle, giving a treat, repeat about 100 times. She wants the dogs to realize that when they hear the whistle, going to their owners is a GOOD thing. I've seen very high energy dogs with virtually no other recall training stop on a dead run, turn, and run towards her when she blows the whistle. I pretty much teach the word "come" with this method, because (not unlike your treat scenario) it's likely I wouldn't have a whistle hanging around my neck 24/7. Once they get really good at it, you can start fading out the treats and it will become a reflex for them, but it does take training and time. Don't yell at her when she returns, you'll likely make it much, much worse (why would she come to you, at all, if she's going to be punished?)
I don't always carry around treats either. But when I go somewhere with my dogs, I usually have treats in my pants pockets. It's no harder for me to toss a few treats into my pocket as it is for me to snap a leash on them, so I usually do this. They also learn that they may or may not get a treat, it keeps them guessing (kind of like a human at a slot machine. They may or may not make money, break even, or win the jackpot, but the chance of cashing in keeps them coming back for more). Plus, they learn that being rewarded doesn't only happen at home, so the likelihood of them bolting and ignoring me is pretty slim :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,614 Posts
Teaching a dog to do anything in the beginning involves rewards. Hundreds of repetitions with rewards make the behaviour more reliable as you increase the difficulty (the three d's: distraction, duration, distance). The place where people mess up the training has several facets: They use a lure too much, they don't reward the behaviour for enough repetitions, or they make the reward part of the cue.

Teaching a recall takes work and practice and LOTS of good rewards...this does not involve waving a cookie around..lol..but it DOES mean practicing many many times and rewarding many many times. Check out the booklet or dvd "Really Reliable Recall" by Leslie Neilson.

And yes, even if you are frustrated, even if she doesn't come right away, even if she comes back smelling like some dead thing she's rolled in...do not punish her. Ever. Expecting a recall under distractions (freedom, other animals, etc ) without it being fully and properly trained is unfair.

I always carry treats simply because I'm a dogwalker/trainer and need them to reinforce certain behaviours among my charges...but often I don't need to use the reward once I have a reliable behaviour and can use praise, the throwing of a ball, some freedom etc instead of food...but as you can see the dog still gets rewarded with SOMETHING (life rewards). I use food until the behaviour is reliable though and still reward with food occasionally to keep the behaviour intact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,420 Posts
but often I don't need to use the reward once I have a reliable behaviour and can use praise, the throwing of a ball, some freedom etc instead of food...but as you can see the dog still gets rewarded with SOMETHING (life rewards). I use food until the behaviour is reliable though and still reward with food occasionally to keep the behaviour intact.
Yes there are many different rewards besides food.

My girl Hope couldn't care less about food when outside, I could wave around an entire roasted chicken and she wouldn't care, the only thing that seems to be more important than any distraction is her drive to be with me, and know where I am and keep me in sight. Velcro dog.

So I taught recall outside by making her stay and walking away, pretty far away, and she is so worried she is going to be left without me she ignores anything but me and comes rocketing to me when I all at top speed.

When I have her off leash and she wanders and doesn't recall on the first call, I run hide from her and inevitably she looks up, doesn't see me and begins a frantic search for me.

She gets lavish praise when she comes, a treat if she'll take it, but usually it's right back to distractions the second that is over.

This has turned over time into me calling her once, an if she doesn't respond I call once more and start walking quickly away from her which usually gets her running to me. But after a year of this she still doesn't come reliably under distraction if she can see me from where she is at unless I start moving quickly away from her, and I'm stuck at this point in improving her recall.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top