Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,997 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As I've mentioned in other posts, I recently adopted a senior basset hound. The first week was a little rough. The poor guy is 10 years old and has spent the last 10 years in an environment where he lived in the basement with a doggie door and was not allowed access to any other area of the house. He was fed and that was about it. When his owner died, the family turned him over to a rescue which is where I got him from.

He and I are having issues. He is entirely singleminded. He wants one thing and one thing only. He wants free roam of the house. I will not give him this because during supervised time he gets in to everything. He goes straight for the dog food bag and tries to tip it over and get his head in there. He tries to get into anything that's up on the counters. He has no manners whatsoever simply because he's never been taught.

I've tried for the last week to teach him better manners with no success. The biggest obstacle I've run into is that he will not listen to me at all when I tell him now. My Spaniel I can just say, "aaaaaaaa" in a loud tone and he'll stop whatever he's doing or thinking of doing. I've had pretty good success teaching him the house rules and he now has pretty free roam of the house when I'm at home.

The basset pays me no mind. I'll catch him trying to get into the dog food and yell at him. He ignores me. I can grab his collar and he will fight me until I pull him away. Then he'll head right back to the food. Same thing with the counter cruising. I can yell at him when he's just looking at the counter and he just ignores me. He'll jump up on the counter and will still ignore me. I can grab his collar and gently pull him off and he'll turn, look at the counter and go right back to what he's doing. I even leashed him up and tried leash corrections. No luck. I've tried crating him when he's inside and he barks and claws at the cage to the point where he's bloodied his paws a time or two. I can't leave him outside as he barks non-stop and/or scratches at the door. Again, nothing I can do makes him stop these behaviors. We can walk for 45-60 mins, come home and he's worn out, but not too worn out to engage in his bad behaviors.

How can I teach a 10 year old dog the "no" command or it's equivalent? Like I said, the spaniel is easy to correct as he realizes when I'm displeased with what he's doing and I can easily re-direct him to something else. The basset doesn't seem to recognize "no". Honestly, he's probably never heard it before in his life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
I think you may be asking a little bit to much of him right now. Leaving the dog food bag out where he has the option of getting into it is too big of a temptation for him to resist right now. Same with food on the counter. I think you should try to "puppy proof" your house first off.

I also believe that you will get more success if you teach a dog what he can do, not what he can't do. I guess what I mean is before you give a correction, he has to have been taught the behavior that you DO want. Its like if I was yelling "schnitzel!" at you and you didn't know what that meant it wouldn't be fair for me to give you a correction or punishment for not doing "schnitzel."

Luckily you have a food motivated dog! Therefore you have a great training tool already built in. After putting up the food or putting it in a bin with a lid or something to eliminate this overwhelming temptation and any others, I would start with this video about "impulse control."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipT5k1gaXhc

go to the address above and watch the video and try it out. This kind of thing will help him learn that if he wants food he has to get it from you. Also try reading the sticky about NILIF and apply this to feeding time. You have a uphill battle ahead of you but it is doable with a lot of time and patience! Hounds sometimes seem stubborn or stupid because their noses make them so easily distracted but they are smarter than we might think! My coonhound loves doing these simple impulse control techniques.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,997 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
We'll watch the video a little later and see what we can figure out. I've been trying NILIF, but it's difficult as he knows absolutely no obedience commands at all. My spaniel has to sit before he gets fed. The basset doesn't know how to sit. I've tried to teach him with no luck. As I move the food/treat over his head, he will back up and then lunge at my hand. If I'm not fast enough to jerk my hand back, he will inadvertently bite it trying to get the food.

There is no food on the counter that he's trying to get at. I'm sure my counters do smell like food though as I cook on them frequently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
I noticed an extreme number of leash restraint points that is counter to the dog freely making a decision to not engage moving towards the food . It seems to me that the dog is learning through a form of restraint processes that it is futile to move forward to take the food and consequently will at some point begin to respond to the cue to gain the reward elsewhere.

I think that it is important to explain all that is happening (the restraint factor) so that one can imulate the process correctly and develop the skillset and timing needed to succeed. I would also recommend a harness as used in the video for those attempting this process if concerned with the negative effects of a neck collar that might result in various situations. I would be interested in seeing a more difficult larger dog and/or a hound to include the before and after in that order to better gauge/judge the process.

As with any process naturally some will be easier to gain resolution with than others for particular dogs... But I do get the point in the exercises and see where they can work well in many cases.

cheers

cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Yeah the first video is definately better than the second. The part I really like is the begining of the first video where the dog learns that lunging for the food doesn't help him get the treat. He learns he has to behave respectfully for it, and I think it helps them learn that when they do get food it is always from the handler. It is also an easy beginners attention exercise which is a great first step for beginning obedience. The more the dog is focused on you the easier he is to train.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
I would take him to a puppy class and start him as a brand new pup because he is new to you and since his last environment was maybe not conclusive to any obed work. Starting as a pup is not that silly, you got to begin somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,997 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Has the dogs hearing been checked out?.....::)
He got a vet check up before I got him from the rescue. He got a vet checkup before I got him. I think part of his deal is that he spent 10 years not listening to anyone. The other part is that he's a bassett and is easily distracted by every scent that catches his nose. I've not checked out his hearing in any formal way. I'm not sure if he's flat out ignoring me, distracted by his nose, doesn't hear well or some combination of all the above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
He got a vet check up before I got him from the rescue. He got a vet checkup before I got him. I think part of his deal is that he spent 10 years not listening to anyone. The other part is that he's a bassett and is easily distracted by every scent that catches his nose. I've not checked out his hearing in any formal way. I'm not sure if he's flat out ignoring me, distracted by his nose, doesn't hear well or some combination of all the above.
sounds like maybe a combo....I agree with wvasko as well...get him into a puppy class :D
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top