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I have a Doberman mix puppy and she turns a year old next month, she’s very smart and learns very quickly but she isn’t obedient at all. She only listens to commands for treats or if we say them multiple times. I train her myself because trainers are too expensive.. is there anything I could do to help with her obedience issue?
 

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That's not unusual, especially for a dog that is essentially a teenager at 1 year old. Also, repeating a cue multiple times has likely already poisoned the word. She now thinks that the cue is "sit, sit, sit, sit, sit" and not just "sit". Additionally, young dogs push boundaries and have been known to "forget" cues and stare at you like you've never given them an ounce of training. Give the cue once, and if they don't perform the behavior, take a step back and lure them into the behavior as if you were training it for the first time.

There is nothing to be done other than keep practicing. Practice in a boring spot, like your living room. Then practice in a more exciting place, like your yard. Then up the criteria and practice in a public park. Dogs don't generalize well, and they don't always know that "sit" means the same thing in your living room as it does in the park. Keep training sessions short and fun.

Once your dog has the cues learned when she knows you have treats and will give one for ever command, start giving treats intermittently. I would recommend you only start doing this once the dog has learned the joy of working with you, though, not when they're a young dog that likes to do their own thing. This generally makes the dogs work harder for that treat, because now they never know when it's coming!
 

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I have the same problem except my dog is a Maltipoo and he does not listen to me at all, and he is only 8 months.
Follow the good advice above from Lillith. Be persistent and always without fail be 100% consistent. If you say "sit", then make sure the dog sits. Don't repeat cues over and over, as said above. Make sure the treats you use for training are really really appealing for the dog. Make training fun, so that she will want to do what you ask and get something super yummy.

And completely disregard any advice that includes any form of punishment or bodily manipulation or scolding because that is guaranteed to make your dog not trust you or want to work with you, and that will make things a lot worse.
 
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