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Her parents are like 75 lbs so she'll be good size regardless but I would love to get her up to about 90 lbs


is tug of war good for them? Should I make her jump for it and hold the rope high so her legs are off the ground or is that bad for her teeth and back?
 

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I know that everything I say (type) will fall on deaf ears (blind eyes), but I'm going to give it a stab, anyway.

It takes genetics, time, and a proper conditioning program. Stuffing her full of an inappropriate food won't help. Overworking her developing bones and joints with unsafe behaviors won't help. Wishful thinking won't help.

I'll just throw out the UKC standard here...

**Height and Weight

The American Pit Bull Terrier must be both powerful and agile; overall balance and the correct proportion of weight to height, therefore, is far more important than the dog’s actual weight and/or height.

Desirable weight for a mature male in good condition is between 35 and 60 pounds. Desirable weight for a mature female in good condition is between 30 and 50 pounds.

As a general and approximate guideline only, the desirable height range for mature males is from 18 to 21 inches at the withers; for mature females it is from 17 to 20 inches at the withers.

It is important to note that dogs over or under these weight and height ranges are not to be penalized unless they are disproportionately massive or rangy.

Very Serious Fault: Excessively large or overly massive dogs and dogs with a height and/or weight so far from what is desired as to compromise health, structure, movement and physical ability.**


My six year old APBT bitch is a lean, solid, decidedly "non-bully" 35 pounds in non-working pet condition.



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I question why you've come to this forum. You won't get advice on abusing a puppy here. For the kind of info you want, you need to Google and find a group with a name like Macho Man Wannabes.
 

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She won't even grow to her full natural potential because she's got chronic diarrhea because you won't do the basic pet care of getting her vet checked for parasites and adjusting her diet. Let alone to some ridiculous unreasonable hulk dog size.

And yes, jumping high is bad for puppies' joints.
 

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This poster has been asking these questions on another dog forum and has already been told that this type of exercise is bad for his pups joints, he has also been given extensive advice about his pups tummy problems.

I think @LeoRose is right nothing sensible we say is going to have any impact on this poster..

They obviously have a dubious agenda in mind.
 

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As far as huge goes, you can't. Not if you care about the health and well-being of your dog, anyway. Your puppy's underlying structure - her height, how broad she is, etc. is determined by genetics, and you can't change that with any kind of special training or feeding. You can make her obese just to hit the number on the scale you want, but this will strain her joints, make it hard for her to be athletic and put on actual muscle (not to mention hide any muscle she has under that fat), and shorten her lifespan. Unfortunately, there are dog owners who do this just so they can brag about how 'huge' their dog is - don't buy into it.

This is why breed selection is important. If having an 90+lb dog is important to you, you really need to choose a breed that's regularly 90+lbs, and find a litter where the parents are both 90+ lbs. Assuming her parents were both a healthy, lean, pet weight, she might be able to get a little heavier than them if you really work at conditioning her AFTER she's old enough to handle it. But if her parents were highly conditioned, I'd expect her to be about their weight, and if her parents were obese at 75lbs, she may even be under that number at her ideal body condition. Of course, if there are larger OR smaller dogs in her pedigree, she may take after those ancestors, but it's a total crap shoot.

As for muscle development, you do have control there. But at her age, I'd stick to low-impact, dog-driven activities like tug (on the floor), swimming, and free-running in grassy areas with hills. Don't think about jumping, weights, or other more intensive exercises until she's fully grown and her growth plates close. Otherwise you could cause injury that, again, makes her unable to be the impressive, athletic dog you seem to want.

I suggest looking at this facebook group, dedicated to conditioned, healthy dogs at ideal weight, and learn what a conditioned, lean dog really looks like, and the work that goes into getting that look.
 

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@DaySleepers lol I know that group... I was advised to join when someone suggested my beagle was underfed...

George is like a little terminator...All muscle but it comes from good food and lots of exersice
 

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I know that everything I say (type) will fall on deaf ears (blind eyes), but I'm going to give it a stab, anyway.

It takes genetics, time, and a proper conditioning program. Stuffing her full of an inappropriate food won't help. Overworking her developing bones and joints with unsafe behaviors won't help. Wishful thinking won't help.

I'll just throw out the UKC standard here...

**Height and Weight

The American Pit Bull Terrier must be both powerful and agile; overall balance and the correct proportion of weight to height, therefore, is far more important than the dog’s actual weight and/or height.

Desirable weight for a mature male in good condition is between 35 and 60 pounds. Desirable weight for a mature female in good condition is between 30 and 50 pounds.

As a general and approximate guideline only, the desirable height range for mature males is from 18 to 21 inches at the withers; for mature females it is from 17 to 20 inches at the withers.

It is important to note that dogs over or under these weight and height ranges are not to be penalized unless they are disproportionately massive or rangy.

Very Serious Fault: Excessively large or overly massive dogs and dogs with a height and/or weight so far from what is desired as to compromise health, structure, movement and physical ability.**


My six year old APBT bitch is a lean, solid, decidedly "non-bully" 35 pounds in non-working pet condition.



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Anyone who wants their pittie to be extra muscular is a horrible owner !!! You best not be fighting your dog. 🤬
 

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Anyone who wants their pittie to be extra muscular is a horrible owner !!! You best not be fighting your dog. 🤬
Not necessarily, LeiLei. Some people build muscle on their dogs for sports like weight pull, or even just general athleticism. Some people enjoy just keeping their dogs at the peak of physical health and conditioning, or even build specific muscles to help offset certain health concerns. So long as they're doing it safely (not overworking puppies, staying within the dogs' limits, etc), I really have no issue with it. These dogs actually tend to be very well cared for, with lots of exercise and a great bond with their handlers from all the activities they do together, and safely built muscles are healthy too.

I agree that muscle-building in certain bully breeds can be a dog whistle for dog fighting, particularly when combined with other concerning behaviors - and I absolutely agree that fighting is abhorrent - but it's far from the only reason people might be doing it.
 

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Perhaps I'm a bit daft or ignorant. But I think just proper feeding, walking, play and exercise will keep the dog fit.

Why do you want the dog to be "extremely huge and muscular"?
 

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Not necessarily, LeiLei. Some people build muscle on their dogs for sports like weight pull, or even just general athleticism. Some people enjoy just keeping their dogs at the peak of physical health and conditioning, or even build specific muscles to help offset certain health concerns. So long as they're doing it safely (not overworking puppies, staying within the dogs' limits, etc), I really have no issue with it. These dogs actually tend to be very well cared for, with lots of exercise and a great bond with their handlers from all the activities they do together, and safely built muscles are healthy too.

I agree that muscle-building in certain bully breeds can be a dog whistle for dog fighting, particularly when combined with other concerning behaviors - and I absolutely agree that fighting is abhorrent - but it's far from the only reason people might be doing it.
Maybe
 

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For an ADBA or ABKC conformation shows, pit bulls are expected to be in extremely fit, lean, and muscular condition. A pet condition dog like my Lily would not be looked at for a placement, even if she were the only dog in the ring.

Also, game-bred dogs are rarely in the 80 to 90 pound range.
 

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Thats really heavy for a pitt, some mixes get that big though. You cant do anything to make your puppy large and muscular. Right now it's all genetics. I m going to do you the courtesy of thinking you are wanting to compete your dog in Weight pull or obstical course or have him for protection training (the last is sketchy for pits, if thats your goal get something else they are not good guard dogs and not naturally ha ). I m also going to assume he's game as you are asking these questions about a pit. My girl sure is so I can tell you you d be better off spending time learning his tells and limits cause it's easy to overextend a dog like that and seriously hurt them. Focus on commands and bonding, establish good eating habits on high quality food she can handle. These are the frame work you will need for any of those things. Pits don't always alert obviously to stress, and can be stubborn (game) about odd things so if you dont have a bond you aren't going to get what you want.
Keep exersize low impact (no weights, jumps, pulls) as you can seriously mess up thier joints. And in short bursts, with enforced breaks every 15 min. Most of thier weight will come naturally now, you font need to try. After he is a year and you know his limits you can think about pushing them
 

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Keep exersize low impact (no weights, jumps, pulls) as you can seriously mess up thier joints. And in short bursts, with enforced breaks every 15 min. Most of thier weight will come naturally now, you font need to try. After he is a year and you know his limits you can think about pushing them
We don't have a pit, but is tug of war bad for dogs joints?
 

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