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I've been reading a lot about "house rules" for dogs. One of the suggestions to create space, is closing off at least two rooms from my dogs... Though it didn't specify what type of usage the room gets. My Red Cattle Dog thinks being my personal stalker is his job, and can't stand it when there's a door closed between the two of us. My penchant for over thinking this is wondering, what type of rooms are most effective?
 

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I don't like closing a dog off in a room. I prefer to either separate the dog in a crate or kennel OR use a see through baby gate.

In my case, due to what I am doing with my two competition dogs, they have NO house rules. They are also rarely IN the house. I want those dogs to think they can do anything and so, if they are in the house they hop on tables, the counter, the back of the couch and so forth.

The house dog has no separate room. She is a bit dependent (and it is her nature that makes her a house dog and removed her from competition status). She naturally is with you.. but never offers to go on furniture or counters or tables and, quite honestly, I never taught her she could or could not. She just is too worried to.

When I did separate dogs and had two in the house (when both the competition dogs were baby puppies) I did not designate any room they could NOT be in. I just put up baby gates and kept the adult dog separate (usually in the bedroom right off the living room). The older dog could see the puppy and see me and I could crate the puppy and open the gate and so forth. It was easy for me and created no conflict.
 

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It's up to you. Your dogs, your house, do as you please. They do prefer to be with the family, whether that's laying on the floor or the couch or their own dog bed. Some people also restrict access to certain rooms in the house, like the kitchen or perhaps the bedroom, for various reasons. One can be counter surfing, or perhaps the dog is just a pain and underfoot when there is food being prepared, so the kitchen is off-limits.

Basically, your house rules are whatever you make them. Unless there is something specific you're trying to prevent (like counter surfing, begging, being underfoot with food about) I don't see how preventing a dog from going in a certain room is in any way beneficial.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't like closing a dog off in a room. I prefer to either separate the dog in a crate or kennel OR use a see through baby gate.

In my case, due to what I am doing with my two competition dogs, they have NO house rules. They are also rarely IN the house. I want those dogs to think they can do anything and so, if they are in the house they hop on tables, the counter, the back of the couch and so forth.

The house dog has no separate room. She is a bit dependent (and it is her nature that makes her a house dog and removed her from competition status). She naturally is with you.. but never offers to go on furniture or counters or tables and, quite honestly, I never taught her she could or could not. She just is too worried to.

When I did separate dogs and had two in the house (when both the competition dogs were baby puppies) I did not designate any room they could NOT be in. I just put up baby gates and kept the adult dog separate (usually in the bedroom right off the living room). The older dog could see the puppy and see me and I could crate the puppy and open the gate and so forth. It was easy for me and created no conflict.
This isn't quite what I intended to communicate. What I'm talking about is keeping both dogs on the same side of the door, and out of my den or guest room.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's up to you. Your dogs, your house, do as you please. They do prefer to be with the family, whether that's laying on the floor or the couch or their own dog bed. Some people also restrict access to certain rooms in the house, like the kitchen or perhaps the bedroom, for various reasons. One can be counter surfing, or perhaps the dog is just a pain and underfoot when there is food being prepared, so the kitchen is off-limits.

Basically, your house rules are whatever you make them. Unless there is something specific you're trying to prevent (like counter surfing, begging, being underfoot with food about) I don't see how preventing a dog from going in a certain room is in any way beneficial.
This may be more of a breed dependant suggestion. I have two Heelers, my acts like a jerk when my other dog wags her tail too hard. And the exuberant tail wagger, she is acutely aware both her appearance and personality make her extra cute. Which she relies upon to get pushy and hog all the pets for herself.
 

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It really depends on what your goals are. There is no 'better or worse'. I have one dog who is pretty independent. He likes to be in the same room... most of the time. But he will remove himself to our bedroom if he wants the dog bed in there, or to be alone. My other dog is like velcro and would be sitting on top of me every waking second if he'd like. He has more restrictions.

The way I teach boundaries is straightforward... I reward heavily when my dogs are in the right places at the right times. I restrict access using a crate or x-pen to prevent them from being in the wrong places at the wrong time. I do this until habits form, then I remove barriers. It does require more supervision, management, and restriction at first. But I'm very happy with my results. Without having to use any punishment (scolding, booby trapping spaces, etc.), my dogs know exactly which rooms they are allowed in, which rooms they are not allowed in, and even where to be during specific events. They know to be on their beds or in the crate when we're eating or doing yoga (both on the floor), and that they can mob us for attention if we are just hanging out on the same floor. The older dog is allowed in the bedroom, the younger dog is not. Both dogs are not allowed in the back room that holds instruments and gear. Both dogs are fine if I am giving attention, training or playtime to one dog and not the other. Both dogs can be with me together or separated with zero fuss. Neither dog will steal or put paws on counters or tables, even if toys or food are well within reach (they are both 65-70#). Same methods. 'Everything' has a boundary and a set of rules in my world.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It really depends on what your goals are. There is no 'better or worse'. I have one dog who is pretty independent. He likes to be in the same room... most of the time. But he will remove himself to our bedroom if he wants the dog bed in there, or to be alone. My other dog is like velcro and would be sitting on top of me every waking second if he'd like. He has more restrictions.

The way I teach boundaries is straightforward... I reward heavily when my dogs are in the right places at the right times. I restrict access using a crate or x-pen to prevent them from being in the wrong places at the wrong time. I do this until habits form, then I remove barriers. It does require more supervision, management, and restriction at first. But I'm very happy with my results. Without having to use any punishment (scolding, booby trapping spaces, etc.), my dogs know exactly which rooms they are allowed in, which rooms they are not allowed in, and even where to be during specific events. They know to be on their beds or in the crate when we're eating or doing yoga (both on the floor), and that they can mob us for attention if we are just hanging out on the same floor. The older dog is allowed in the bedroom, the younger dog is not. Both dogs are not allowed in the back room that holds instruments and gear. Both dogs are fine if I am giving attention, training or playtime to one dog and not the other. Both dogs can be with me together or separated with zero fuss. Neither dog will steal or put paws on counters or tables, even if toys or food are well within reach (they are both 65-70#). Same methods. 'Everything' has a boundary and a set of rules in my world.
What type,of,boundaries do you set on for your Velcro dog?

My Red is my first Cattle Dog, and a rescue at that. When I first got him, I was coming off the accidental death of another dog. I was very anxious about losing my new dog as well. I took him out every day, and still do. Except, back then I had him on a 30ft long line attached around my waist. Not even kidding, I took home swimming in a nearby pond, on that darn long line. I think I accidentally may have created some separation anxiety in him. I was just so thrilled to have something to take care of again, I didn't want to risk losing him.

He's a mix of quite pleased with himself, and hiding under the dining room table pouting when I go to work. For all my mistakes, I have one hell of a recall, lol.
 

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I don't use any barriers now, except when he's alone during work hours, and overnight. But it used to be crate or X-pen when he wasn't being supervised. And he was dragging a leash in the house and outside for the first few weeks. So 99% of fun times (training, play, treats, food toys, affection, etc.) happened in one space inside, and within the boundaries of my unfenced yard outside. After the habit was set and I removed the leash and barriers, he still stays in the one 'allowed' space, and in the yard, by choice. Even if I go into other rooms, take a shower, cook, etc. Outside, same thing; he chooses to stay in the yard even if a dog walks by, if I cross the street, etc.

One thing to note is I have a very, very small living space. Like, less than 300sqft (not counting bathroom, bedroom, and storage space the dogs are not allowed to be in) inside available to two 65-70# dogs.
 

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Personal preference. Mine dont have any restricted rooms, but they've been taught to leave a room when told. "Out of the kitchen " when I'm cooking comes in most handy.
 

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Is there something specific you're trying to accomplish that we can help you with? Do you just want space to yourself that is dog-free? Or are you just curious what other people do?
 

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We've restricted access to the craft/guest room in the past (back when we first got Sam), but that was more a safety/management issue than anything. Dropped pins, tempting yarn to chew on, etc. are best kept away from puppies. Our current apartment is an open floor plan with only one bedroom, and the only place Sam can't go freely is the minimally insulated entry way/storage room. And that's more to do with heating concerns than anything! We have taught him a "place" command that's frequently used in the kitchen to keep him out from under our feet and away from hot things going in and out of the oven. When we do get a second dog, we are planning on having at least a pen setup where we can separate the dogs, so they can take breaks from each other when somebody's getting overwhelmed or annoyed.

We don't have heat in the bedroom, so we do keep that door closed, but Sam's allowed in and out whenever he feels like. It's also where he stays when we're out of the house, instead of a crate setup.
 
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