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Hi All. Long story short, my mother-in-law just bought a new puppy about 6 weeks ago. She doesn't really have the time needed to raise the puppy correctly, so my wife and I will now be taking over for the time being to get him properly house-broken as well as other important things.

My worry is that he is now around 13 weeks but still seems to be peeing wherever he wants. He knows that outside is a good place to go, but doesn't think going inside is a bad place. The reason of why I'm worrying is that although 13 weeks is still rather young, the optimal time to teach house-breaking is 8-12 weeks.

We have a few books that we're reading, but I'd be grateful if anybody had solid tips to get a puppy house-broken at a later-than-optimal age. Also, we figure it would be good to have a rigid schedule for the puppy including bed time, feeding, potty time, play time, crate time, etc., so if anybody has a good schedule recommendation, I'd love to get that as well.

Thanks!
Kyle
 

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Puppy is still very young, so there is still time!

Outside every 15 minutes. If they have an accident still, take them out every 5. No exaggeration. Constant supervision, and crate them, or tether them to you if you can't keep 100% focus on them. Again, this is not an exaggeration. The main goal is to form a habit of going outside and going outside only. Any time an oopsy inside happens, it's a little bit of a setback. If you catch them in the act, interrupt (don't scold, yell etc), and tell them "outside". Clean it up with nature's miracle or a similar cleaner. Take them outside, give treats and praise if they go outside.

As for a schedule, I never really had the luxury of a constant schedule with my pup other than feeding time. I always fed puppy 3 times a day. Morning, noon and evening. It was easier to monitor poop time that way, too.

Consistency and supervision is the key. If you can't provide that.. the dog will not be house trained.
 

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Housebreaking isn't really about teaching them not to go inside - that's a really common misconception and way of screwing up the process.

Bottom line? You're not *teaching* with house breaking so much as you're forming a habit of going outside and PREVENTING accidents from going inside. You need to have your eyes on him all the time he's out and about, rush outside when you see signs that he's about to go and probably every 30 minutes (at most right now) as well as after eating, drinking, or playing. If you can't watch him, he needs to be confined to a crate. That's it. It's tedious, boring, and a pain in the rear, but it's what it takes.

Every accident allows him to form a habit of going INSIDE or to break down the strong preference/habit you're trying to build for him to go OUT/not go inside. So, yeah. This one is all about preventing the undesirable behavior and rewarding the desired one. Stop him going inside, continue to reward for going out.

And expect that he won't be reliable until 6+ months, because he does not yet have physical control to really, reliably hold it before then. There is no magic cure, there is no short-cut, there is no easier out. The only way to speed it is to be ubergood at not letting accidents happen in the first place, NEVER punishing for going inside and thereby creating a dog who is afraid of going to the bathroom in front of you, and a really thorough clean up job of those accidents that do happen using an enzymic cleaner.
 

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i got my dog when he was 9 weeks old. he was out every 15 minutes. during the night he was
out every 2 hours. take the dog out often and don't wait for a signal. when you can't watch the dog
crate the dog.

use the charts as a guideline. things are different for each dog.
 
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