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Greetings all. I brought home my first puppy back in October. Beagle mix, mom was beagle/chihuahua, dad unknown. He was three months old when I got him. Needless to say house breaking was an issue as it seems to be with all puppies. He was peeing inside and outside at least 25 times a day. I started taking him outside every 30 minutes and it reduced the number of times he'd have an accident inside. He lives in the family room with an attached heated enclosed porch and a baby gate to keep him from accessing the rest of the house. He would spend his nights in a pen I built for him in the enclosed porch that had his crate, a food bowl, water bowl, and access to the doggy door. It's an area maybe 4 feet by 3 feet. He'd still pee inside the pen area as well as occasionally outside when it seems to suit him.

Then I noticed he was drinking a tremendous amount of water. Per a formula I found about water per pound of weight he was easily drinking double what was recommended. He has no medical issues, Vet checked him out. A lot of info on the web says don't limit his water but I found just as many articles from people with good credentials that said limiting water would be OK. So I gave him water with each meal, AM & PM, and some during the day when it looked like he was hunting for his water bowl. Even with that I cut his access to water in half. Accidents became less. He still pees often, it is a good color, no indication of any dehydration.

Slowly he learned to go on his own through the doggy door when he needs to. So much so that he no longer needed the pen and has the run of the family room all night long now. Accidents in the house were dropping off dramatically. Then a week goes by and no accidents, two weeks no accidents, three and no accidents. Hallelujah! He's got it! He knows to go outside to do his business. I figure the problem is licked, no pun intended.

Then while at the Vet for a follow-up appointment last week the subject of water comes up and she tells me at 6 months old he needs all the water he can get and I shouldn't worry about how much he drinks. So he has his water bowl back with a big jug attached that keeps it full and guess what, the accidents in the house are starting up again. Four times yesterday even though he still goes through his doggy door on his own. He went weeks without peeing in the house and as soon as he has access to all the water he wants he'll go out his doggy door about 75% of the time, the rest is on the floor in the family room. Thank God we have laminate flooring there. I clean each accident with a recommended enzyme spray so there should be no smell.

I can't help but link this to too much water. Any thoughts on that?
 

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I don't like to restrict water during waking hours. What I mean is that I refill water bowls as needed before I leave for work, while I am home and before bed but I do not refill water bowls during the sleeping hours for adult dogs and do not have water in the crate for puppies during the night time. By 6 months old, most dogs can hold it overnight and for a normal work day with maybe the rare accident.

When you took him outside on a schedule, did you also reward him for potty outside? Like a small treat or a few pieces of kibble? That helps reinforce that outside is where to go.

What vet checks were done and how recently?

Is it very cold where you are? Since you are expecting him to use the doggie door rather than taking him outside, he might be avoiding outside because its cold and uncomfortable.

Healthy dogs don't drink "too much" water per se. They drink what they need. I think its more likely to be a house training issue than a too much access to water issue.
 

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If you think he's peeing more than usual I would get a second opinion from a different vet or ask your vet for more diagnostics.
Sounds like he never got proper potty training when he was younger. Too much freedom, not enough supervision, maybe not enough praise/treats. With less water he probably didn't really have to pee till he was running around outside during play, or maybe that any accidents were smaller pees and less often so not noticed before they dried.
I would go back to proper potty training. Full supervision, crated (not just in a pen) when not watched, lots of praise/treats for going outside.
 

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I am NOT a vet. But I would definitely talk to your vet about further diagnostics. Ask about "diabetes insipidus". It is an incredibly rare disease, incurable, but easily treated. I am only mentioning it because I have worked with a dog that has this and I am reading some similarities in your post. He was a young adult around 15# and would drink like it was an obsession at times, like he could never get enough water. Of course, he peed a ton as a result, and sometimes more than you thought could come out of a dog that size. It was not consistent though. He may or may not have had a couple seizures; on separate occasions his energy dropped to a concerning low, to the point of complete lethargy. But otherwise... He was a lively, personable, fun, energetic, feisty, motivated, smart dog. He truly perplexed everyone, even people who have been working at the shelter for over a decade. The dog was with us and received extensive care and training for... I want to say 2 months or so but I could be wrong.

Again, not a vet. Yours could be a very normal house training regression, which is honestly MORE common in young dogs. And sometimes young puppies do drink a lot of water because 'it's there', not for a medical reason. Kind of like how some puppies have a phase where they eat rocks, or leaves, and then grow out of it. But the odd things that stood out in your posts were: "peeing 25 times a day", assuming you're not exaggerating, and "drinking a tremendous amount of water" then and when you reintroduced unlimited water 3 weeks later. Diabetes insipidus is hard to diagnose. Basically, the vet would rule out other more common things and does a water deprivation test (I am oversimplifying the process). To my knowledge there is no certain test that TELLS you a dog has it. How my organization found out was basically test for everything else that was feasible (all negative), then start treating for diabetes insipidus (problem solved in 24 hours).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I always brought a treat and used the "go potty" command when outside. He wanted his treat so badly that he'd fake taking a pee just to get it. The go potty command also works when he's inside and near his doggy door. 90% of the time he'll go out.

It is very cold here in Northeast Ohio. I can see your point about the weather. But it doesn't seem to bother him when he does go out on his own. I've watched him through the window and it looks like he enjoys romping in the snow.

The vet check was about two months ago.
 

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I've read about training regression and started to potty train him like he was a new puppy again. We'll see how this goes it's just so damn aggravating that he had it down then lost it again.
 

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I would also consider a second opinion from a different vet, just to be certain. But some puppies just think water is fun, so they drink it.

Good thing taking him back to potty training 101. I would consider keeping him strictly managed. That means supervised 100% (eyes on, no chance to pop a squat!) of the time so he can't have any accidents, and when you can't supervise him he is in his crate (which is appropriately sized, just big enough to turn around and lay down in). Take him out for frequent potty breaks, on leash, and reward reward reward for a successful potty trip! If you catch him in the act, interrupt with a word like "Ooopsie!" and rush him outside, where he is rewarded for going in the correct spot. I don't think this pup is old enough to be trusted to take himself out through the doggy door quite yet, as most pups don't have that type of control of the bladder. They sometimes have mere seconds between "I have to go" and "GOING!" I know you said he was doing it fine before you unrestricted water, but no pup is really potty trained until they're well over 6 months old, it seems!
 
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