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With the all the issues that are popping up about commercial dog foods we have decided to make our own. Now we have dabbled with this in past using the home food as a supplement to the dry food. We started using 100% homemade food today. Our two older dogs (Bouvier Des Flandres and a Greyhound) are fine so far, however our American Bull Dog pup threw up her dinner. I figured that she ate something on our walk that upset her tummy. I gave a bit more food later and within about an hour, she vomited again. I wonder if we should mix the dry food and homemade food and introduce it more slowly? I also wonder if we fed her too much? Is there any way to measure home made food volume against commercial dry food?
 

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You can make up a recipe at Nutritiondata.com and compare to calories protein and all that in the kibble you had been feeding. I had no trouble figuring calories but protein, no idea how to figure that one. It is fun and easy to use the website. You could use the home cooked food as a topper if you like. If you are feeding a puppy it is important to have the correct amount of calcium and phosphorus for proper growth as pups cannot regulate the amount of those minerals they absorb.

I have learned the hard way that a vomiting dog needs to rest the stomach for a bit. It is a waste of food and can make the dog sicker if you feed when the system is irritated. Fast your pup for 12-24 hours with only water offered. Then feed a spoonful of over cooked rice and chicken. Repeat if it stays down every couple hours. Over a week's time increase the amount of food to a normal amount and decrease the meals to 2 or 3 depending on how often you fed the pup before he started vomiting. If things go smoothly then start substituting the regular food for the bland diet after that.
 

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Thanks for the reply Kathyy.

As it turns out the puppy was just gorging her self with the food. We gave her smaller portions today, and mashed the food down into the bowl so she could gulp down mouth fulls. So far so good.
 

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I'd enjoy constructive discussions of "homemade" (as opposed to raw, or raw meaty bones) as part of a diet with certain commercial foods.

My basic home recipe is slow cooked brown rice, carrots, sweet potato, a green vegetable and fresh meat. When it's done I balance the phos in the meat with Wysong Call of the Wild, which is a supplement powder with extra calcium.

I rotate this with various canned foods (Benji's not fussy anymore) and a little kibble.

We enjoy making the home cooked food.

Ron
 

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Well we are fairly new to the home made thing. We had done some reading for the past while on it. What appears to food related illnesses in my pets have just gotten to be too much.

I now know exactly what is going into my dog's food.

We are using recipes that are approximately 40% protein, 30% starches, and 30% vegetables.

We have used different meat for the protein. Some times we use chicken and salmon, and other times we will use beef and venison (when avail). Eggs are sometimes included.

For starch we will use potatoes, sweet potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal and pasta. (not at the same time)

For veggies we use peas, carrots, broccoli, squash, cauliflower and pretty much anything else that does not pose a danger to their health.

We also will include some fruits.

I do want to start adding some oils to the mix. Fish, olive and flaxseed oils are suppose to be beneficial.

We cook the food and then place portions in zip lock bags and freeze them.

We have used the home food as a supplement in the past but now we are using 100%.

We just have to keep a close eye on the dogs weight, coat, and general health to make sure the protions we feed them are acceptable.

So far we have notice all three of three of the dogs drink less and poop less.

I am not really sold on the raw food idea. I won't argue that it is not beneficial but seem even less convenient than cooking the food.
 

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Sassy gets home cooked food because she was diagnosed with kidney insufficiency back in spring of 2007. Remember the dog food recalls? They kept getting closer and closer to the brand of kidney kibble she was getting. That plus she would not drink water and that corn based kibble plus water is very nasty looking lead me to home cooking. Things went smoothly until she got a UTI 15 months later and the antibiotic killed her appetite. My vet gave her Pepcid and all was well but I eased up and started giving her more than rice, chicken, pumpkin and egg whites.

Her system is amazingly sensitive and noticed when I changed 10% of the starch or meat. That is just not right so I am now trying the usual glop plus varying it with a bit of beef or pork and potato or pasta. Adds chunkiness and variety but not too much. Last week she got pumpkin custard, rice with chicken stock and roast chicken, too fancy and drove me nuts making up her plate. She loved it though and it was a good lesson in how you can combine the exact same ingredients to make a completely different type of food. I cook 4 days worth at a time and keep in the refrigerator and save broth ice cubes and cooked meat in the freezer. She likes her rice but adding a bit of chicken or beef flavor is still good. One day's worth of food goes in a quart tub.

I was just trying to keep her happy and eating but the home cooked food has made her less stinky, her teeth and ears cleaner and she does have smaller poops. I think her shedding is more normal as well. She holds on to the hair and then it just comes out in masses when she gets groomed.

Because she is old and sick she gets a bazillon supplements but calcium and fish oil are the only ones she would need if she was young and healthy. The old sick dog supplements all go into a spoonful of canned green tripe as dessert.

My recipe comes to 39% carb, 31% fat and 29% protein right now. She does fine with more fat than that but 30% protein is about as good as it gets with her phosphorus restriction. As well as watching the amount of meat I have to use lower phosphorus carbs like glutinous rice, pasta and potato. No brown rice or oatmeal for her. Haven't fussed with many fruits and vegetables, probably should. She does like broccoli, carrots and banana at least. Maybe I will try to work bits of high phosphorus organ meat into the diet as well.

My favorite dog food making tools are my digital scale and my 70 year old boning knife. The old dog needs careful measuring to keep her diet very exact and the young dog gets fat if I don't measure his food carefully!
 

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I've cooked for my dogs before, but this is the first time I've fed them only the homemade diet. The pups enjoy it, I'm enjoying it bc of the smaller poops, less shedding, and cleaner teeth/nicer breath. They've been on the diet for almost 2 months now, and I've noticed a big change. My little hyper girl is able to settle for short periods, and they're all more shiny and pretty. I've even notice hair on Brigit's tummy! She's never grown hair on her stomach in the year and a half I've had her.

They get a meat and veggie stew. I've tried to stay away from grains bc they don't agree with my girl. They love it, and I like knowing what's going into their food, and that it actually looks like food.
 
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