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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Two of the things Wally isn't - pawsy and mouthy.

I'm trying to work on both. Shake training was part one of today's session. I think, sort of, kind of, we are making progress. He actually started holding his paw about a 1/2 inch off the ground for a little bit waiting for the click to put it down. Sometimes.

We did about 25 of those. The first 10 I took the paw in my hand and the other 15 times I coaxed him to lift his paw, and when he held it up a little - I said "Shake!" then clicked right after and treated. It would have gone by fast - except he kept looking at the treats :) So I had to keep refocusing him (looks like tomorrow I will be working on that as a refresher).

The second part of the session is what the topic title is about. I had him hold his rope bone in his mouth (the one he gets giddy for when I butt-rub him in the morning). I told him to hold it. At first he didn't want to, but I kept it from coming out and said "hold it" again. Then I'd give him a lot of good boy's and some soft strokes on the back (I didn't want to click, because he'd let go since the click ends the behavior).

Then I got a crazy idea. Make him do things while keeping something in his mouth. This is where it got like he was in la la land. It was like he forgot to sit! I had to pat his rear lightly for him to sit. Then standing, lying down - all like he didn't know the commands anymore. So I went back to the gentle patting (like patting his stomach for him to stand, gently guiding him down to lie down, etc)

So then I wanted him to walk around a little with it in his mouth. You know how dogs carry things in their mouths? Actually, I've seen him do this - he'd "fetch" bones and drop them at my feet to collect :rolleyes: Anyway, he seemed like he didn't know how to walk. I actually had to use my "let's go" cue to get him to start trying to move. I guess the whole thing was different to him. He did walk around, though, and when he got back to his bed, had him lie down, hold the bone and look at me a little while, then a click and big jackpot.

What was absolutely like...odd...was that he wouldn't drop the bone. I guess he was waiting for the click, or the release word? Just seemed interesting since he seemed less than enthused about the idea, but then wouldn't STOP doing it! Weird dog :)

About 30 seconds after I came here to start typing this post - he lied out with big sigh and he's sleep now LOL I guess I wore his brain out.

So...was it him having something in his mouth that made him "forget" how to sit, lie down, etc?
 

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Hehe, what breed is he? Willow (a Lab) absolutely couldn't think of ANYTHING else when she had something in her mouth. We used to say that there was a switch in the back of her mouth that turned her brain off......
 

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It takes some work to get most dogs to perform OB commands while holding an object. They either drop the object and "sit", or they forget how to "sit" when holding the object. It's best to start with something light and soft to the mouth--like a high-nap paint roller--and get the dog to where you can firmly tap the object without the dog dropping it. Then try introducing movement and OB commands.
 

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I agree with Marsh Muppet- you just need to increase the duration and durability of the hold behavior.

One way I've been working on this with Kaylee is asking her to retrieve something (she only has a play retrieve at this point, we haven't started dumbbell work yet) and then once she's brought it to me, moving away from her again. Initially, she'd drop the toy in the first spot I'd been and then follow me and have to be re-sent for it. Then she'd drop it, pick it up, and follow me, and now she just follows me. :) Right now I'm refining the whole retrieve chain, but our next step will be to get her reliably putting the item IN my hand vs just near my hands, and hten I will fold my hands behind my back until she offers a sit with the item in her mouth, so she'll start sitting when she returns with an item. It just takes building in tiny, tiny steps. We only do 5-8 retrieves at a time, and I *always* quit with the toy before she's anything like ready to stop. If she doesn't do something correctly (*ie, runs away with the toy, drops it and refuses to go back for it), the game ends- the toy AND I go away. :p
 

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With my Aussie I started on a Monday with the shake a paw routine. 2 , 10 min sessions Monday and another on Tuesday. I didnt think he was going to get it at all. On Wed morning he came to sit at the end of the couch and looked at me and just starting waving , like waving for about a minute, it was very funny to be honest. I dont use a clicker cause I dont like that style of training. It was just 'shake' and make sure he doesnt see the treat or your right , his focus wont be on the trick ,just the treat :)
After I said shake I grabbed his paw and shake it about 10 times and gave him the cookie. Thats how it worked with him.





Two of the things Wally isn't - pawsy and mouthy.

I'm trying to work on both. Shake training was part one of today's session. I think, sort of, kind of, we are making progress. He actually started holding his paw about a 1/2 inch off the ground for a little bit waiting for the click to put it down. Sometimes.

We did about 25 of those. The first 10 I took the paw in my hand and the other 15 times I coaxed him to lift his paw, and when he held it up a little - I said "Shake!" then clicked right after and treated. It would have gone by fast - except he kept looking at the treats :) So I had to keep refocusing him (looks like tomorrow I will be working on that as a refresher).
 
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