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Discussion Starter #1
I have a border/Aussie 10 week old puppy. I am trying to find outlets for the energy and for her intelligence.

At 10 weeks, she knows: sit, down, come, roll over, stay, and off (though that last one she isn't great with).

I do at least 30 minutes of work with her in the morning and 30 minutes of work in the evening. She gets about an hour of play time outside of that. So 1 hour training, 1 hour play. She is still loaded with energy and seems bored.

Thoughts on what I can do? Are there tricks/obedience people taught their puppies that you would recommend? Were there games they were especially in love with that you would recommend?

I'm trying to teach her fetch but I can't seem to get it to stick (I need to learn better how to teach it).
 

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A puppy of any breed is going to be very energetic. You're simply not going to drain her energy, and probably never will until she is an old lady. Instead, after she has received her daily allotment of play/training, focus on teaching her to chill out. You will really be glad you did when she becomes an adolescent.

But some things my Aussie/Collie likes are tug, and a game we play where I tied a 50ft. rope to this big rubber ball/tug rope type toy and pull it along the ground for him to chase. So, in other words, a really big flirt pole without the pole, or a mini lure coursing. There's something about tug and chasing a ball tied to rope along the ground that really tires him out.

Shaping games always seem to tire my dog out, too. I taught him out to put toys in a bin using shaping, as well as put is feet in boxes and stuff.
 

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I have a BC adult (now 3) and an ACD/BC pup.

Bottom line: What lillith said about teaching her to chill out, and rewarding calm behavior and not being an entertainment director and also DO SOCIALIZATION TRIPS AND TIME when she's just playing, exploring the world, and observing it. Otherwise you're going to have a highly trained dog who doesn't know how to be a dog and hasn't taken her attention of you to observe the world.

Bonus - going to a parking lot at the grocery store and sitting for an hour and watching things, or hanging out in the yard playing on her own on a long line and sniffing around (once she stops pestering you to be the entertainment director for her), or chewing on a bone on a mat in the living room WILL help her chill out and burn some energy.

But seriously: Do not create a monster. Give her reasonable amounts of exercise and training and then stop. She'll bug you. She'll fuss, she'll live with it and be a better dog for it.
 

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I will echo the sentiments & advice given above - Exercise, train, enrich, socialize & then *install an off switch*. If you're struggling to keep this pup entertained at 10 WEEKS, you will be out of your mind at 10 months. Do not build an adrenaline junky. Start working on 'settle' now.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone for the advice.

So this is what I'm thinking and would really appreciate the help.

The dog is great when she's in her 'area' - the crate and penned off area. She's calm and rarely hyper. When we let her out of that area is when she gets hyper crazy.

So how to train 'settle'.

This is what we've been doing. We let her out of her pen and bring her over to us, we have treats, and we have her lay down then treat her as she lays there and doesn't squirm or bark. I usually say settle throughout it. When she does squirm and run and jump, we try to get her to sit then lay. Sometimes we make her roll over so she is on her side. When we are outside and she gets overly amped, we make her sit and be quiet, but still let her play and run and get hyper while we are out there.

As for socialization, we are doing the best we can given the fact she isn't fully vaccinated. She's been to friends' houses, been to a couple house parties, and has had playtime with another puppy and a cat. When she is fully vaccinated, she is going to be out in the 'wild' constantly on hikes, restaurant visits, the beach, etc. so her socialization will really go full bore at 16 weeks and 1 day.

Does this seem sufficient? I know it's like diagnosing a problem with a swim stroke over the phone and want to make sure I have a dog I can take shopping and be confident she won't rip down the shelves (and will lay peacefully at my feet as I eat).

A day right now looks like this:

6:30-7:15 - train and play
7:15-10 - her penned off area
10-10:15 - pee break
10:15-noon - penned off area
noon - however long she wants to stay outside - lunch and play (though it's usually too hot for her)
Same routine as morning until 5
5:30-6:30 - Dinner, train and play
6:30-7:30 - pen
7:30-9/10 - Free roam in living room with heavy emphasis on proper manners, such as settle.
10 - bedtime

So what's the prognosis for that? Not enough work? Dream dog in waiting? Annoyed there was so much text?
 

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Look up Kikopup's YouTube video called "Capturing Calm." I liked that one because I didn't want to have to DO anything to get my dog to settle. It just rewards them for being calm on their own when you're not doing anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As a quick addendum: a problem we've been having is her barking and yipping at us. She stands there and barks unending at us. We've tried turning our backs on her to no avail so I've started putting her in a 'timeout pen' which is a tiny area for her to chill out. She still barks though. When she finally stops barking, I give her a treat. Every minute or so, I give her a treat until I let her out of timeout.

Thoughts?
 

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Look up Kikopup's YouTube video called "Capturing Calm." I liked that one because I didn't want to have to DO anything to get my dog to settle. It just rewards them for being calm on their own when you're not doing anything.

Thanks! Will check it out.
 

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At only 10 weeks I'm sure you don't have a rock solid bond. She may hange around you, come when called but you are still not the center of her life. Another 6 months, maybe. As active and driven as you say she is, she probably has the top qualities of both breeds, as well as their quirks.

Barking is the Aussie trademark. They tend to use this in their herding role. My own Aussie uses barking to get attention and to cause action, as in herding. It's taken a a while but now my dog will bark if she needs to go out to go potty. If she is trying to boss me or just get her way I use a no barking command with a no no finger movement. She has learned that the fun action won't happen until she calms down. It doesn't mean 15 minutes of standing still, just enough for her to come out of overdrive. A couple seconds now. Then a nice reward. It's a constant thing as you are dealing with an instinct. You can't eliminate it but you can redirect it.

Somebody noted that it's only beginning now. Very true. By one year she be virtually tireless. At 4 1/2 years We walk 3-12 miles every day, regardless of weather. It's pretty extreme in Minn.

You are doing fine as a puppy. I'd encourage you to help her learn to use her nose for a purpose. Finding treats, dinner, toys whatever. These guys need to use their heads for additional exercise. Mental things use lots of energy. I'd encourage you to go to puppy classes. You probably know everything you will learn but you can learn new techniques as well as proof your own. Being with other dogs in a controlled environment is very important to these high drive high energy dogs. Thus is where you will begin to help the dog learn to work even in overdrive. You can graduate to the next level classes and eventually to the much more advanced ones. You don't have to compete but use the exercises to mentally challenge the dog. Some instructors don't like this but do the class work, even if you need to your own methods.

I would not use force on this dog. She is a little young for a prong but as she gets older her fur will thicken a lot and you can use a prong just for a reminder. I use one with a 12" tab. Only a light finger tug or just rattling the chain is all I ever use or even have used. I also use a harness with a long leash.

I'd suggest you develope a " dog language" that you use on her. Talk to her....a lot. Praise for good things. I go to classes every week and very few people talk to their dogs. A couple will offer praise. Otherwise most people are like mummies. They look at me like some old guy that is losing his mind. I get down on the floor occasionally and act like a dog. Even bark.LOL BUt I communicate with my dog. She watches me, looks to me for direction and gets treats for good things.

You have to develop a sense of what the dog is thinking. Be 3-4 steps ahead of her all the time. Leave the phone in your pocket and stop smoking.....makes the dog sneeze.

Byron
 

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As a quick addendum: a problem we've been having is her barking and yipping at us. She stands there and barks unending at us. We've tried turning our backs on her to no avail so I've started putting her in a 'timeout pen' which is a tiny area for her to chill out. She still barks though. When she finally stops barking, I give her a treat. Every minute or so, I give her a treat until I let her out of timeout.

Thoughts?
It's most likely attention barking, so yes, ignoring it and rewarding the calm is a good method. It's a normal puppy behavior, especially for a herder. When we got my Aussie/Collie, he barked at us while we were eating for 2-3 weeks straight the entire time. We completely ignored him, and he gave up. Sometimes he still stares at us, but meh, whatever, lol.
 

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Does she sleep other than at night? Cause honestly it does sound like she's a little overstimulated with the barking and all.
I had a little of the same issue in the beginning before I made a strict sleep schedule.
Now she's a lot more mellow, rarely acts up. And we get plenty of fun training sessions, play and nice small walks.
If she fell asleep instantly when you put her in the pen, and when it is a bedtime it's still only 15 hours of sleep. But I reckon she's awake quite a bit in her pen too, so the total ends up on a lot less.

As others have said, teach her to settle and chill. And by all means sleep, cause pups need a lot of sleep while growing.
 
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