Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all.

New member. I imagine I'm not going to be all that popular here, but giving it a shot anyway. Reason being, I'm interested in finding a 'designer 'breed'' (yes 'breed' is in double quotes on purpose). Namely, a golden doodle.
I've read enough posts to know that any question I post is going to be met with a zillion replies that I should adopt a mutt instead of paying for one. I know. But here I am anyway.

My most recent dog was an awesome standard poodle. She currently lives with a good friend of mine who is a shut-in. Our house has lots of different people coming and going at all times, and lots of activity, and her natural cautiousness over time turned into mild anxiety. She liked kids, but was also a bit jumpy and would get scared at sudden noises/movements by the kids. This didn't cause a problem for the visitors or the kids, as she was a lovely dog, but I felt bad for her as she was sort of stressed all the time. And before anyone says we should have given her more exercise (something I've heard a lot) - we jogged with her between 6-12k most days of the week and did agility activities with her on other days - trust me, that dog was not lacking for stimulation. When we had twins, we 'temporarily' had her stay with my friend so she could get more attention that we were able to provide at the moment. Well, long story short, my friend fell madly in love with her and she fell madly in love with him and his sister. So there she stays to this day. She's happier, as my friend is there 24/7 and they have essentially no visitors or break in routine.

Cut to the end. I loved the poodle breed. Looking for a bit more laid-back and able to adapt to changing routines without causing the poor dog stress. I love golden retrievers I have known (never owned one). Their owners seem to be always covered in their fur. I have business dinners at my house. It would be quite embarrassing to have my guests leave covered in my dog's fur.

SO, I know. A golden doodle is not a 'breed'. Their temperaments are unpredictable. They can still shed. And yet. They may be a BIT more laid-back than a pure spoo. They may shed a BIT less than a pure golden. And either would be a bonus. So I'll be on other threads getting beaten about by folks reminding me that is no such thing as a 'reputable breeder' of doodles, while I continue to ask for help finding exactly that.

Glad to be here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
My sister has two Golden Retrievers and like you say, no matter how much she cleans up, there is always hair everywhere. I have a Golden Doodle and she is one of the nicest dogs I have owned. I do clip her about three times a year but she does not shed. I also have her daughter by a Poodle so she is 3/4 Poodle, a large miniature Poodle and a Standard Poodle. Of all of them, Bonnie, my Golden Doodle is my favorite. I have just started competing in Agility with her and she loves it.

I do not think their temperament in unpredictable if they have good natured parents. I think it very unlikely that with a Golden Retriever mother and a Poodle father that you will not get a nice temperament. You will not sweep any hair up in my house from any of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
Should have also added that before I got Bonnie, I had never owned any dog with Poodle in them and she sold me on the breed to. I have three Shih Tzu x Maltese as well and they are non shedding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Hi,

I have two little mixed breeds who are the light of my life. I paid for one before I even knew what a "designer dog" was and the other is a foster/adopt from a bad divorce/dv situation.
I love them both to pieces, refuse to have them DNA tested until I can afford to pay off all the NECESSARY dog expenses on my credit card, and will be more than happy to be unpopular with you.

Welcome to the forums. There may be some strong opinions here, but there are also a lot of kind people and excellent information on how to give your dog the best life you can. Poodles and Goldens both have fantastic temperaments so I doubt if you'll have any problems, regardless of whether you choose to call your pup a "Goldendoodle" or an "All-American".
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,799 Posts
I don't think the objection here to designer breeds is any stronger than that to backyard breeders who breed "AKC-registered purebreds." You'd get a lot more flack if you told us you planned to get your dog from a pet store.

If you can find a breeder who health-tests both parents, breeds a very limited number of times (and "breeds") each year and screens potential owners, more power to ya. After all, it's your money.

Personally, I've had exactly one purebred dog from a good breeder. I've had two from backyard breeders (and both had chronic health issues,) one from a shelter, two from owner surrenders, one stray that adopted me and one (the newest addition) from a good rescue organization.

This last one is almost certainly a shih-tzu/Jack Russel mix, which happens to be a trendy designer breed. (They's calling them Jack-Tzus or something equally silly.) Somebody probably bought him, discovered that the Jack Russel personality isn't something they could deal with, and surrendered him.

Regardless of where your dog comes from, if you treat him/her well, you're likely to find general acceptance here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,913 Posts
I have an intentionally bred mixed breed dog. He was bred for stockwork, but the fact remains: Breed purity is not the standard by which I decide if I a breeder is good or not. You'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
This last one is almost certainly a shih-tzu/Jack Russel mix, which happens to be a trendy designer breed. (They's calling them Jack-Tzus or something equally silly.) Somebody probably bought him, discovered that the Jack Russel personality isn't something they could deal with, and surrendered him.
The story around localville is that the puppy mill resellers dumped a lot of Chorkies on us because they bred too many, they weren't popular any more, and us country bumpkins wouldn't know any better than to follow "care instructions" that would ensure the puppies' early demise before the clever marketers could get caught.

I love her personality and was seriously looking for a reputable chorkie breeder who would take a deposit from a low-income renter. It was literally the day after the Wisdom Panel 3.0 I ordered from eBay went missing that I heard about Chocolate.

I was told that she is also a "trendy designer dog" and that Jack Russell, Chihuahua, and a large breed were involved. The Jack Russell is just as believable from her personality as Yorkie is from Laurel's. The large breed would have been extremely stupid to cross with those breeds, so I sometimes say "probably Chihuahua and Jack Daniels" instead of "probably Chihuahua and Jack Russell" to be funny.

I don't want or need to know. She was the beloved pet of a seven year old child, is housebroken and knows basic obedience, and has been through a lot of trauma recently. She's a good dog who needs a lot of love to reach her potential. They're both Chihuahua/Terrier mixes, All-Americans, or "Chica-wawas" now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
What matters IMO is just to make sure that the parents have health testing done... and that's why it's hard to find a good designer breed breeder. After that, really, there's a demand, I'd still rather see people get them from a good breeder that makes sure to breed healthy and well-tempered parents than anyone just taking two dogs and breeding them.

One important thing though.. I'm not sure where you got your poodle from, but just because that one was nervous doesn't mean that they all are. It really had a lot to do with genetics, and if you really love poodles, you might want to just look into a reputable breeder that breeds well-tempered dogs.

And the golden retrievers I've known were NOT laid back at all. Really, the couple poodles I've met were much more laid back. So, if you don't want to risk hair at all, I would seriously look into a well bred poodle again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with breeding doodles as long as both sides were thoroughly health screened and the breeding was done thoughtfully and purposefully. I do think most people who get a doodle would have been as satisfied or more satisfied by a regular standard poodle.

Goldens are truly lovely dogs but you should bear in mind that they're extremely slow to mature, so you're liable to be dealing with puppy stuff for upwards of two years, that a typical doodle coat takes about twice as much grooming work as a regular poodle coat, and that goldens are very prone to cancer and several other heritable health issues. You might get more gregariousness out of the cross, sure, but there are other trade-offs you'll be making when you bring in that golden DNA. I'm not saying don't do it, I'm just saying, weigh the pros and cons ahead of time. My late golden was, in some ways, the best dog I ever had, but I don't see myself ever getting another.

I'd also point out that while the average golden is more sociable and mild-mannered than the average standard poodle, you're not getting "the average dog," you're getting an individual. There are goldens that are snappish (there's one in my dog class), and lots of standard poodles are social butterflies. If your goldendoodle breeder isn't mindful of the temperaments of the dogs in the line, you can't assume that crossing in the golden will be an improvement in that regard.

Depending on your region, it might be easier to find a standard poodle breeder that's known for producing dogs with more mellow temperaments, than to find a goldendoodle breeder that's following conscientious breeding practices.

Again, I'm not saying don't get a doodle - I'm saying, keep your eyes wide open as you're considering your options and looking for a pup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
We have a bernedoodle. Although we love her to pieces, I think I would probably get a standard poodle next time. One of the main reasons is the coat. Her puppy coat was one thing, it was dense and fine, but now the texture has changed, and the summer is here so I want to trim her closer than before. It's really brutal. She now has extremely dense and thick fur. I don't imagine a goldendoodle would have a coat like that, but thought I would mention it just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,296 Posts
Welcome! I don't think many people here are blatantly anti-doodle. More like, anti-bad breeding. I know it's subjective. But I see the bigger issue (not you) as the fact that dogs are a commodity to a lot of people, which doesn't mean those dogs aren't well loved too. But when there is a market for the next big thing, which happens to be doodles, there will be unethical suppliers. If you want a doodle, that's great! They can be as wonderful, costly, or heartbreaking as any mixed or purebred dog can be. The thing isn't whether or not you want a doodle, but how you're going to go about getting one while making sure you aren't accidentally supporting unethical breeders or folks just throwing dogs together to make a buck. That is, if you care about that sort of thing. At the end of the day, no one really cares how or where you got your dog if you don't ask, and if you take care of your dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I'm not sure where you got your poodle from, but just because that one was nervous doesn't mean that they all are. It really had a lot to do with genetics, and if you really love poodles, you might want to just look into a reputable breeder that breeds well-tempered dogs.
Thanks Francl27. And not a bad idea at all. It broke my heart when our dog just couldn't fit with our family, so I'm trying to figure out how to ensure a better match this next time. I always thought you could train away anything, but it just isn't true. I could train her to be polite even though she was stressed and unhappy, but I couldn't make her happy in a busy household with her naturally shy temperament. But they are an awesome breed. I'll keep that door open as I look around. We actually have 1.5 years before I would add the dog to our household (I want our youngest to be at least 4yrs), so I'm hoping to find an excellent breeder and get on a waiting list...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,435 Posts
I've heard from my vet friends and trainer friends that many of the doodles they've met have been crazy -- slow to mature, boisterous, high-energy. The coat can also be a big problem, easily matted and not always non-shedding. If you do go the doodle route, choose your breeder very carefully, meet the other dogs and gauge their temperaments, and go for a pup with a curlier coat. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
Bonnie was my first venture into "Doodles" and I know they can vary but her coat is the easiest I have ever had. She never matts or sheds as it is a looser curl than the poodle. I can let it grow fairly long if I want or clip it off short. I also have a Standard Poodle and I find her coat with the tighter curls needs way more brushing or it does matt. When I bred Bonnie once before getting her spayed, I kept her daughter which has more of the tight curls of the poodle as she is 3/4 Poodle and her coat is a lot more work to keep it brushed.

I am not saying that you can't get different coats but from what I have experienced, the Poodle coat is a lot more work.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top