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Discussion Starter #1
I think our new dog, Hailey, is dog selective, or dog agressive. I'm still trying to figure out which. The previous owner's reason for sending her to the humane society was that their other dog was mean to her, so maybe that has something to do with it. Hailey loves Molly, they are the best of friends. But any time she sees another dog she growls, then barks a lot and lunges toward it. She doesn't listen to me, I have to drag her away :( I have no experience with a dog who is so agressive towards other dogs. How can I help her?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
She's a little boxer/terrier mix.
I forgot to add, when she's barking at other dogs she also runs back and forth, trying to get away, then lunging at the dog, then trying to run the other way, etc.
 

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Dog aggression is a term used by dog owners and breeders to describe canine-to-canine antipathy. Factors contributing to the likelihood of the development of dog aggression include: anxiety, lack of structure, lack of proper exposure to other dogs during the critical socialization period, early imprinting by an aggressive or nervous dam, a traumatic experience, territorial behavior, thyroid malfunction or other medical conditions, abuse from previous owners, medical or physical ailments, and/or breeding or genetic disposition. The form that treatment for dog aggression takes depends on the underlying cause of the aggression, and an accurate assessment is therefore essential. The United States has the highest reported incidence of dog aggression problems of any country in the world, with an estimated 4.5 million dog attack victims each year. Aggression itself is usually defined by canine behaviorists as "the intent to do harm". Dog aggression manifests at the age of adolescence to social maturity (6 months to 4 years). Most reputable trainers will recommend that a dog has a vet check to screen for medical changes that may be the cause of the dog aggression before attempting any form of behavioural modification.
 

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And another thing to add, without actually seeing the behavior, it's really hard to give good advice, other than seeing a good trainer/behaviorist. There are also some good books and DVD's out there as well, like Click To Calm by Emma Parsons, Aggression In Dogs by Brenda Aloff, Constructional Aggression Treatment DVD set by Jesus Rosales-Ruiz and Kellie Snyder, Cujo Meets Pavlov! DVD set by Kathy Sdao, In Focus by Deborah Jones, Get Connected With Your Dog by Brenda Aloff, When Pigs Fly by Jane Killion, Control Unleashed by Leslie McDevitt, and more. I have all these and more, lol.
 

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keep her from situations where she is prone to exhibit the behavior. those kinds of behaviors are usually self reinforcing and will get worse and worse the more the dog is put into those situations.

first things first scheduale an intensive vet visit. check for everything. pain and discomfort due to medical conditions CAN be a cause or contributing factor to such behaviors.

second thing seek out a behaviorist.

in the meantime...work on self control cues. "leave it" "drop it "stay" and similar..

start this work in distraction free areas. "stay" is a good one to start with. put her in a down and stay. put food in front of her and give a no reward mark everytime she goes for it. reward with the food when she looks away from it.

start adding distractions, loud noises, someone running past, in the yard with all the distractions associated with such. vary location as well

another good one is "look at me" or focus. shape a cue where she focuses on you when told. add distractions. vary locations.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A search for a dog behaviorist in my city turned up nothing. How is a behaviorist different from a regular dog trainer?
 
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