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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I just got a 5 month old yorkiepoo. He had lived with a lady who didnt do anything at all training wise and i am having SUCH a hard time. First he isnt potty trained, after going to a local petland, we got some bitter spray and spray his mouth when he does it inside. FINALLY he has started to pee outside, but will not poop. He will wait till night and do it in his cage. When he does pee outside i will give him a training treat. We have tried the spray that you spray on the ground where u want him to go and it doenst work. We have tried the training pads, and the only thing he will do with them is poop AROUND them during the day when im not home.

Next he wont SLEEP in his cage, he barks all night long, all night long till he goes hoarse. The only way he doesnt do this is if he is sleeping with me, and its not good for him to. ANd i dont want him to get used to this. How do i get him to actually SLEEP?

HELP ME PLEASE
 

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Put the Bitter Spray away. That does nothing for teaching the potty training. Training pads....teaching the dog that it's OK to go potty in the house (on the pads) and that going outside is OK too is a very tough training regime....you have to be exact/very demanding with both types of training. I would pick either one or the other.
As for going in the crate at night....dogs usually eliminate 16 hours after eating. Either change his meal times or sleep schedule or both. The amount of exercise will effect the schedule.
Lastly, why is he banished......alone and afraid?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
OK so bitter spray away, we want him to go outside to "eliminate" we are just at the bottom of the barrel here as to how to get him to. How do we do this after he has had 5 months of do whatever he wants?

So we need to plan the meals to coincide with waking up times, instead of middle of the night times. We want him to sleep in his cage with the door open, and we want it in our room. We just dont want him in the bed anymore (we have rolled on top of him and we are afraid we will hurt him). We want him to make that his domain and like it. And we only keep him in there to sleep.
 

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Do not punish the dog for eliminating in the house. Negative training techniques rarely work in the long run.

Since you "just got" the dog, remember that this dog has had 5 months of unusual training, so expect to take 2-3 times as long (10-15 months) to get this dog fully re-trained. I've fostered many dogs and some of them catch on quickly to new things, others take very long. We adopted an 8 year old dog 18 months ago and we are still working on issues like barking. With a puppy I would hope that he would catch on more quickly though. You may be able to get him fully trained by the time he's a year old.

So, treat this dog like a new puppy...outside at least every two hours, 24/7. Yes, set an alarm for the night. If the dog has been successful outside then you can choose if you want to give him some freedom in the house, but always supervised. If not, the crate or a gated area is the best place. If the dog has not been successful outside then he needs to be crated and taken out again every 20 minutes until he produces. In the case of messing in his crate, you can only hope that one day he will poop outside and then you can act like he just dug up $1 million and you are the luckiest person on Earth!!!! Really, it will be about catching him doing something good and the positive reinforcement that comes with that act. Also, be sure that potty rewards are something that you only give for elimination success and something that he loves more than anything. My dogs will die for turkey hot dogs so that's what they get when I'm ttrying to reinforce something new. One day that dog will poop outside and you need to be ready. But even when you are rewarding for potty outsid eit needs to be special, something he doesn't get for any other reason. And if you tend to be a quiet person try to be really happy, body language and verbally when your dog is successful.

Be sure you are feeding the dog at least 2 and preferably 3 meals per day on a regular schedule. Schedule going in = schedule coming out. This should make elimination of urine and stools fairly regular, predictable, so you will know when the dog is most likely to be successful.

When your dog has eliminated in the house, just clean it up with an enzyme cleaner (from the pet store stuff) and let it go. The dog was not being supervised. If it happens in the crate...just clean it up. The dog will do better when it knows better and no amount of negative reinforcement is going to help that.

The crate issue can take a while as well. Some dogs take right to it, others cry until they exhaust themselves. Our dogs start out with the crate in our bedroom. I give them an old, but unwashed, t-shirt or towel that I have used so they are comforted by the scent in their crate. And I smear a dab of peanut butter onthe back wall as often as I remember so they find a pleasant surprise by going into the crate. The crate is left accessible to them, with the door open, whenever we are home so they can choose to go in there to sleep or just have a quiet place of their own. Also, the dog must be tired when put into the crate initially. So before I crate any new dog we spend 20 minutes or so in a rousing game of fetch (we have a long hallway for winter or wet weather play) or a good brisk walk. Tired dogs will usually wear out the whining faster. If they keep me from getting sleep (= makes me cranky at the job that pays for the dog's food) then they get moved to the other end of the house where I can't hear them with the door closed. I have even put crates in the garage when the temerpature is moderate enough to do so. But my dogs must sleep in their crates, stay in their crates when I am not home, and must ride in their crates in a moving vehicle.

So both issues need lots of time and patience. Rescue dogs are not always easy. You have to take the time to un-learn the bad habits they come with.
 

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The crate in your bedroom is excellent. I would close the crate door and move the crate close enough to the bed so you can touch him during the night. Your touch is powerful reassurance..you often don't have to say anything. They usually quiet right down and go back to sleep.
 
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