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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We have a 6 month old pitbull/bulldog mix. She seems to listen well and catch on quickly but when we go for walks she likes to do her own thing. We walk her alond with 2 other dogs who both walk very well. The pup will do "ok" when she is next to the other dogs, but if she is walking with my wife behind me and the other 2 dogs, then she constantly pulls and chokes herself.

Is there any way we can control her more? We already put the lease in a high position around her neck...up near her ears as they do in dog shows, but it doesnt seem to help. Even when i do a quick jerk on the leash to correct her, she still attempts to pull forward.

I want her to walk next to me and obey my corrections with the leash, but i do not want to intimidate her. If she gets too bad i always stop and make her sit and be calm. once calm we resume but it will again continue. Also, she walks with her tail curled up over her back....isnt that a sign of dominance? the other dogs understand we are the leaders....does she?

any advice?
 

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I've found the turn around and go back in the opposite direction the most effective. There are two really crucial points here though...the first is turning into her to do the about turn...bump into her if you must but, cut her off. The added benefit of doing it this way is that she is forced to pay attention to where you are.

The 2nd point is the most important one...if you want her to walk at your side you have to show her thats where she should be. Shorten the leash so she can't get so far ahead, wide or behind. Praise and treat only when she's right where you want her.
 

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get a halti, or gentle leader, or no pull harness. they are amazing you literally put them on and start walking, no human correction needed; the dog creates both the cause and effect. The tough part is if you are used to traditional pinch or choke collars it's hard to break the habit of reprimanding. They generally run about $20 at the pet stores. Be sure to thoroughly read the directions and fit it correctly, they are very different from any other doggy collar device.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the feedback. Ill keep working with her and try the turn around method. I'm not so sure about the harness from the second post though. our ultimate goal is to walk her on a leash and for her to understand that this needs to be how it is. we have 3 dogs already (pitbull/beagle mix, pitbull/bulldog mix, and a palmeranian/papion mix) and soon may adopt a 4 yr old cane corso to add to our pack so being able to walk all 3-4 dogs at the same time using the same leash and they all understand the same rules is a key thing that we would like to eventually see. thanks for the recommendation though, i always appreciate any response!
 

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If she walks fine when "with" the other two but not when BEHIND with your wife it could be excitement and wanting to be with the pack. Can your wife try walking ahead of you instead? See if that works. Dogs do not have to be right by your side or behind you (this is nonsense by the way)..as long as they are walking looseleash there is no "dominance" going on. Dogs pull because they want to go someplace and yours is still a puppy so excitement is a big thing! It takes a while for impulse control to be learned.

I find the no pull harnesses like the "easy walk" by premier very helpful for walking groups of dogs as well, especially a powerful breed mix like yours.

As for the tail curled up over her back..um, no , it is NOT dominance. Some dogs naturally carry their tails up when they are happy, excited or stimulated. Nothing to do with dominant tail carrying. Which would be accompanied by a lot more body language.
Tails are actually not the best indicator as a lot depends on the breed, spitz carry their tails up all the time, as do rotties (when they have them). The WHOLE picture needs to be looked at when it comes to body language. Body position, ears, eyes, mouth, even the tongue position need to be taken into account.

I highly recommend you do some research on dog body language. Brenda Aloff's book " Canine Body Language: a Photographic guide" is a bit pricey but well worth the purchase price..maybe you could find it second hand or in a reference library. You may find it invaluable since you are going to be adding to your fourfoot family.
 
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