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Discussion Starter #1
My senior corgi was recently diagnosed with diabetes. Prior to her diagnosis she had stopped eating (obviously) and got quite ill. Once she was on the mend she had no interest in her kibble at all. We feed Taste of the Wild. I switched her to Stella and Chewy's freeze dried raw and oh my goodness, both my dogs go crazy for it. And their poops are tiny! (Have a 10 month old Mini Schnauzer too). I want to keep them on a raw diet but I cannot keep paying Stella and Chewy's prices. Yikes! If I fed both dogs full time on it, it would be over $400/month!
I am looking to make my own raw food but I absolutely do not want to do RMB's. I want to get a sturdy meat grinder and grind everything up.
I've been reading like mad on the subject and I personally wish to make each meal balanced. I have to feed my diabetic dog twice a day so I was thinking of grinding up whole chickens and throw in a (very) small amount of ground up veggies and fruit along with either tinned sardines or fish oil. I would feed this in the morning. Pretty sure with the bone content of chicken, they'd get their daily allotment from this meal.
Evening meal would be ground up beef (either heart or some lean roast) and organ meat with a teensy bit of produce.
I would either do green tripe for probiotics or just get some supplements.
The truth is I am learning and don't know if this is a good plan or not. I am putting my dogs on Darwin's for this month so they can try the ground up raw meals before I invest in equipment (meat grinder, scale). If they hate it, fine, I will figure something else out. I just want to feed a good, healthy, low carb high protein not too fatty foods to my dogs.
I found the recipes for the above on a blog but I don't know if I can share the link. Thanks in advance!
 

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Yes, offering ground whole chicken would be about 15% bone which is great. Keeping it separate is a good idea as one dog may need more or less bone than another.

I'd feed organ with the ground chicken meal and keep the organ grind separate at first as dogs new to raw usually have issues with rich organs at first. Even for a dog used to raw giving an all organ meal will result in softer and very dark stool. 10% organ, half liver and half kidney/spleen and such. So for a 5 pound chicken that will be matched to 5 pounds of beef/tripe/egg/sardine you need 8 ounces of liver and 8 ounces of other organ. Actually a bit more but that whole chicken has kidney and liver inside so close enough.

Do branch out and offer other proteins as you find them. I love feeding beef but pork and lamb have a lot to offer as well. Tripe is great stuff but not as good as beef. Feed egg as well. Apparently the protein is better absorbed cooked than raw, my little guys get a scrambled egg each weekly usually when I forgot to thaw something out.

Keep the veggie/fruit grind separate as well at first. Current dogs do fantastic on veggies and fruits but my first dog did not.

Once all tuned in then mix together as you please but take advantage of DIY at first.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! I am sure once we get into a groove I will branch out and try different things. I am currently feeding freeze dried raw lamb dinner and it has a lot of organ meat in the blend as well as produce too. In the past, whenever I've fed my corgi any different kibble she'd get the worst diarrhea, like in her kennel while she slept. :( But with this raw food, she has not had one bout of it! That convinced me FINALLY that raw is the way to go. Also before I dive in making my own we will feed Darwin's which is a full balanced raw frozen meal and there will be beef, chicken, duck and turkey to change up things. I'm giving myself a month to gather information before I dive into making it myself! I guess I could start prepping and freezing. I have a nice big chest freezer. :)

So you suggest feeding a bit of ground organ with breakfast and a bit with dinner? Spread it out a bit rather than their whole day's worth in one go? That makes sense. The recipes that I found was here. It seemed to match the ratios I had read online.
 

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Thank you so much! I replied a few days ago but it looks like it never posted. So do you recommend not mixing all the meal components at the beginning? The raw food they've been consuming has been a blend of muscle, bone, organs and produce so if they've been eating that ok am I past the dodgy transition?
I am excited! We got the raw ground patties delivered yesterday and they both tried them for breakfast. They loved it! It was duck. I think I'm going to head on over to amazon and get a good grinder and kitchen scale and get started!
So if I always feed them a poultry grind in the morning (so half their daily food) will I need to add bone meal to the evening meal if I go with a meal of beef or pork, something that I can't feasibly grind the bones of?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hm, I know I read it somewhere but I'm having a hard time finding it again. What are the general ratios dogs should be getting of muscle meat, bone, and organ meat? I thought I saw 70% muscle meat, 10% bone, 10% offal, but I can't remember what the other 10% was! lol!
 

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The general rule is 80% meat, 10% bone and 10% organ. Meat other than the meat on the chicken bones should be mostly red meat like beef, pork, lamb but some tripe, egg and fish is a good thing. Maybe that's where the 70-10 comes from. Ground whole chicken is 30% bone so feeding half chicken grind comes to 15% bone which is fine. Less would be better but it's fine. Starting out transitioning to prey model raw we use only whole chicken and work over time to that 10% bone. You might start out feeding bony chicken grind plus boneless meat at every meal and gradually change it over to whatever works best for you and your dog's guts.

Darwin's doesn't tell you how much of the meat in the grind is bone heavy necks and backs. Maybe it is about 30% bone, maybe more, maybe less. I'd start out with simple ground bony chicken for a couple days, add in some reserved chicken skin and if that is fine then substitute some of the chicken grind for some boneless red meat and once on half bony chicken and half red meat of all the varieties you intend to offer regularly then start with organ. It's just so the dogs' guts don't get overwhelmed and go into an annoying cycle of poor stool quality that irritates the bowel which results in worse stool quality and you have to start all over again with lean bony chicken.
 

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Makes sense! I know it will get easier as I get going. I fed the girls the Darwins today and they went crazy for it! Especially the beef! Pretty sure they both downed their supper in record time. Now they are sniffing around looking for extras...! No bowls of kibble sitting there for hours. Ha! I think it will be fun coming up with enticing grinds of flesh and bone to feed my little furry beasts!
 
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