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He is fine with his bowl of food. We can take it away and he doesnt do anything except try to jump up and get it. It is when we give him a food flavored bone he first runs away to a corner somewhere. If we try to take it away from him he gets extremely defensive and starts to growl.

What can we do about this? How do we stop it?
 

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first, STOP taking away the food bowl. How long would it take YOU to get pointed with someone who kept taking away your dinner plate when you are hungry? Instead, defuse the dog's anxiety over having his high value resources taken way by giving him treats while he is eating. Start by dropping treats in the bowl, and move up to hand feeding treats. The treats you use for this should be extreme high value, things he gets at no other time, such as good cheese, left over table meats, liver treats, etc.

Same with the bone. Don't try to take it away. In fact, at first, don't even go close. Toss treats nearby him that he will not be able to resist. Do this on a regular basis.

Then, in day to day life, when he has toys or other things, play the "trade" game. Offer a treat. Wait for the dog to drop what he has. At the moment he does, say "drop it"
and offer the treat at the same time. Don't reach for or grab the toy. Let him pick it up again after the treat, then repeat. After several repetitions, give him a large portion of a treat, or several, that will take him a moment to eat, and THEN pick up the toy. As soon as he is done with the treat, hand the toy back to him.

In this way you will teach your dog that hands reaching towards him are to give things, not to take them away. Over time his anxiety over having you or anyone else approach while he has high value items will melt away. You will be teaching him through the trade game to drop things on command. You will accomplish all of this with low stress on your part, and on his. You will build trust and respect between you and your dog.

I never take things from young dogs or puppies without offering something in return. Once my dogs are adults, I can remove anything from them or their mouths, or ask them to drop something, and they do it. They do not grab things and run away because no one has ever taken things away from them without offering something in return.
 

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Number one: dont' take the food bowl away. Really. Just let the pup eat his dang dinner. What messing around with a dog's food does? It creates anxiety (hence the jumpingup) and then when you give him something he REALLY wants (the bone) he is not going to risk you messing with it so he guards it. The more you take things away the more vigilant he will become. It's setting a bad and dangerous precedent for your puppy.

If you want to work on this you need to do the above PLUS:
When puppy is eating dinner, hand feed a portion of it.
When puppy is eaing dinner, stand a few feet away (far enough that he is NOT WORRIED about you being there..which means his eyes are on the bowl, not on you and he is not inhaling it like he's not eaten in ten years) and then lightly toss an even more awesome something near or in his bowl (like a little piece of chicken or cheese).
Do not leave the bowl on the floor all day, when he's done and MOVED AWAY, toss him another little something and pick the bowl up and put it away.

When you give him a highly valued chewbone, again leave him alone. Give it to him somewhere where he cannot go hide with it, but leave him alone.

For training: start with something low value for him (a not so fave toy etc) and work on training a drop it with TRADING UP. He's got a ball say, you use a piece of food hold it in front of his nose til he drops the ball, feed him the treat and then return the ball to him. You gradually work on using higher value things but always make sure that the item YOU offer is higher in value (to the dog). Eventually you can put it on cue "drop" or "give" so that the reward comes AFTER, but in the beginning it has to be a trade so that the dog learns that your sole purpose in life is not to steal his stuff. You want him to learn that giving stuff to you is an awesome thing, not a terrible thing and you will have a dog that is HAPPY to give you stuff. Less anxiety on his part, less need for you to get frustrated on your part and a much much SAFER dog..both with you and with others who may inadvertently come too close to his stuff. Many children get bitten because a dog is resource guarding. It is important to modify this behaviour safely and properly.

If you like, there is a great book by Jean Donaldson called MINE that you can order online. The whole booklet is on modifying resource guarding.
 
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