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Discussion Starter #1
Ok first off i just got her yesterday so had nothing to do with her weight. Porcha is over weight n i meant OVER. she like a coffee table right now. Any Ideas on how best to make her comfy n to help her lose the weight.
She loves going for walks takes her a bit n have to stop alot but today she had to nice long walks. think i may have over done it but she didn't want to be left alone
she is a doberman cross n is 8 years old. Right now iam the stop before she finds a home unless my mom falls in love with her n we get to keep her. will post a picture of her in a bit.

iam on the thought that Porcha would be animal abuse from the way she looks the way over feeding from what i got told by the lady she was bigger then what she is now. so she is slowly losing the weight. but i worry she might have a heart attack or something.
 

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I would start with a visit to your vet. She may have a thyroid condition that is contributing to her weight issue.

I'm not a big fan of low-fat commercial diets. Often they are loaded with carbs and fillers. A little less food (possibly) and several short walks daily should get you going in the right direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
oh its not a thyroid issue. the lady even admitted that it was cause her husband over fed n didn't walk the dog. she will be seeing the vet this coming week if i can get her in. I would take her to one of the other vets in the area but that means a 30min drive as the one 2 blocks from my house doesn't like big dogs. and the guy talks to you like your an idoit.
 

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I recommend Wellness Core Low Fat kibble, and make sure you feed the amount the dog SHOULD weigh, not what she weighs now. Go to the vet to see what her ideal weight should be. The walks are a good idea, but don't overdo or she'll be very sore, especially at her age.

I faced the same situation with my MIL's 7 year old cockapoo last year. MIL had to go and live in assisted living and couldn't take her dog with her (thank God-she was killing the poor thing with food and Milkbones!). I took the dog (another family member wanted to put her to sleep - NOT!), with the understanding that the family would pay for a vet visit and that I would rehabilitate her and rehome her when I was done. Rosie looked like a swollen tick when I got her at 28.2 pounds in February 2011. She was supposed to weigh between 14-15 pounds, according to her vet - WOW!

I put her on Wellness Core Reduced Fat (again, the amount for what she was SUPPOSED to weigh) and took her for walks; short ones at first, then longer ones, as she was able. She also started enjoying playing fetch, especially as she got slimmer. Finally, by the end of July, 2011, Rosie had reached her goal weight! A few months later, I found her the perfect home with a retired couple. I showed them her before and after pictures, so that they would understand the dangers of overfeeding. They were horrified with her "before" pictures, needless to say.

Rosie before:

Rosie after:
 

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As it has already been said, a trip to the vet will be necessary to determine if she has an underlying issue contributing to the weight. Just because the lady admit to overfeeding does not mean there are no health issues. During this visit you can also discuss what her ideal weight should be (to determine how much to feed) and an appropriate diet. Any decreases in the amount of food being fed need to be done slowly, as do any changes to a new diet. Ask your vet if they have any measuring cups available (if not you can find these fairly cheap at any dollar store) and begin to measure out her food. Designate one person to feeding, if a lot of people like to feed her, measure it out into a baggie and keep in a spot where everyone has access to and that is all she is to get over the day.

If you do wish to give the occassional treat there are treats that are designed for dogs that are less active/overweight that can be purchsed. Purina Veterinary Diet Light Snackers (http://www.purinaveterinarydiets.com/Product/LiteSnackersCanineTreats.aspx) or Medi-treats by Medical (http://www.royalcanin.ca/index.php/Veterinary-Exclusive-Nutrition/Canine-Nutrition/Veterinary-Care-Nutrition/Medi-Treats). I prefer the Medi-cal treats personally.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i know she is to be around 60lbs as that is what my dog was to weigh and they were about the same size
here a pic of porche when she was younger at her ideal weight. this is about 5 years ago.

will double check with the vet.. on everything
here is porche now. we still trying to figure out how she got up there but she did
 

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Treats can be baby carrots and no-salt green beans, rather than dog biscuits. Your dog may turn up her nose at these "treats" at first, but trust me, hunger will make her come around within a few days. Rosie refused to eat anything (even the kibble) for 3 days after we got her (MIL fed her fresh cooked chicken every day - I don't do that), then began eating anything and everything I put in front of her after that!
 

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Georgia Peach has my recommendation for food. I used Wellness Core reduced fat when we adopted a 43.7 pound dog that should have weighed 25 pounds.
 
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