Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,777 Posts
It sounds like your dog has some separation anxiety issues, and I don't think your plan of action is going to work. It may even make the issue worse.

First, the barking is likely to irritate your neighbors (if you have any nearby). It's also very easy to steal or torment a dog from a backyard, and since you have no real physical fence, the dog will likely run right through the shock in his panic, or see a deer or something and decide to chase it. Many dogs escape invisible fences that way. Since he destroys things, he'll likely destroy the dog house, dig holes, and get into anything else he can get his mouth on. Also, the shock may increase his anxiety and give you more problems.

So, to answer your questions, no, he will not stop barking if he's suffering from separation anxiety, which it really sounds like.

You probably need a professional to evaluate his situation and get him the help he needs. The can suggest a training regimen for him. Also, how long did you try meds? They typically take a couple months to fully work. I'm sure someone else who has more experience with that can help, or perhaps a behaviorist can help you decide what's best for your dog.

I understand the frustration with the peeing in his crate. These are not ideal scenarios, but they're certainly safer than leaving him in a backyard with an invisible fence. I would consider these short term solutions while you deal with there real underlying issue.

1. Can you dog-proof a room of your house and let him have that? Will he be less anxious if he has more space? Some dogs get really anxious when left alone in their crate, but are okay if they only have a single room.

2. Can you create a kennel type area in your garage, if you have a secure one? That is certainly safer than being outside, and it's less of a deal to clean up if he has an accident.

3. Is daycare an option? It might be a short-term thing while you deal with the anxiety issue, but it will relive you of some pressure.

4. If none of the above work for you, a small outdoor kennel/run area might at least keep you from having to clean up (and you still have to clean out the kennel periodically, its just not in your house), but your dog is still going to be anxious, and will probably still bark, so it's not fixing the underlying issue. You must make sure the run area is locked and secure to deter thieves, has shelter, and your dog can't dig out of it. Really not ideal, I might add, because horrible people slip poisoned food into there, especially if the dog is making a racket, but safer than an invisible fence.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,777 Posts
We have had him 4 years. He was fine when Jake was alive. He has been on meds for months now with no help and he has never went through the invisible fence.
Just because he hasn't before, doesn't mean he won't when let out there for an extended time on his own, ESPECIALLY for a dog who is exhibiting signs of separation anxiety. Because of horrible people who enjoy tormenting dogs, wildlife that may want to hurt a dog (even deer can be nasty if young are involved), and just hazards in general, and invisible fence is probably the worst confinement option.

Have you considered talking to your vet about different medications? Have you talked to a behaviorist about paring the medication with a training program? Meds in training typically work hand in hand.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top