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Discussion Starter #1
First, a little background. Last summer we rescued a 40 day old male Korean Village Dog with just a few days left on death row, that was left outside a clinic in a box. My household includes me, my wife, and our 10 year old son. This pup is an absolute genius who loves mental stimulation, only taking a couple tries to get a new trick down, even more complex stuff. He now reliably understands 30+ words/commands, and partially understands much more than that. He has always had what seems to me to be mild anxiety issues but he is overly friendly to dogs and kids, and will usually leave adult humans alone unless he feels he is prompted to greet them. Before I looked into modern training methods (I haven't had a dog in 20 years) if I tried to use any type of punitive training he would panic and get the zoomies. He still gets them if I say "NO" too loudly or firmly. He was neutered 3 weeks ago and is now almost 6 months old.

He has always tried to join in and lick our faces if we kiss or hug on the sofa, and wedge himself between us if we are showing affection to each other. Last week I was sitting on the sofa and when my wife approached to sit down he suddenly jumped up and barked and mouthed her hand rather firmly. It seemed playful so we weren't too concerned. The next day he did it to my son, including the mouthing, as he tried to sit down by us, with a bit more aggressive bark. The following day, as my son came into the room he jumped up and started barking and growling and didn't want to even let him on our side of the living room. He also won't let my son near my wife on the sofa. So now he won't let anyone near me on the sofa, and won't let my son near my wife, but is fine with anyone on the sofa as long as the lowest "ranked" person sits first. I got a clicker, started clicker training, and started trying to do some desensitization training since a couple days ago and he seemed to respond, maybe too well. Today he excitedly greeted my wife wagging his tail as she neared the couch, and allowed her to sit down which got our hopes up. We clicked and treated him and gave him lots of attention which he just basked in. A while later she left the room and came back in not even toward the sofa, and he gave the most seemingly aggressive display yet jumping up and down off the sofa growling and barking, then tried to herd her away from it. Now the guarding has spread to both sofas and the bed... I've been reading books on this, watching videos and researching non-stop, but things just seem to be getting worse not better. Maybe I am being impatient and moving too quickly, but I am very concerned about this seemingly unpredictable behavior toward my son, especially after the firm mouthing incidents.

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What a cute dog.

Suspect you need professional help. As he is growing he is developing serious resource guarding issues. You are noticing it around the sofa but it will manifest in every area. Better to get a pro's take. He may need medication for generalized anxiety and a carefully considered behavior modification protocol so a vet behaviorist would be your best bet. Right now you are playing whack a mole when you need either environmental changes so those pesky moles move out or you learn to live with them.
 

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Don't give him a choice to behave like this. He needs structure and boundaries. This means NO more couch. NO more beds or chairs. It means teaching him that his bed is his place (and no one will bother him there) and the other parts of the house are YOURS and not His.

I would train him to go to his bed. Or crate if you have that. That is the rule. That is non negotiable. I would have a leash on him in the house and whenever he starts this behavior, have him "go to his bed." Use the leash. Make it happen and then make the bed a good place (food, toy) and a place YOU won't bother him. Don't turn it into a fight. Just be clear and businesslike. Be consistent. Don't beg him to stop. Simply take him to his bed and that is where he is to go, not next to anyone on the couch.

I don't think he needs medication (of course I cannot see the dog). I doubt it is anxiety. You may very well have a confident dog who has found he can make you back off to get his way.

Give him structure, clarity in your handling and cut him no quarter when it comes to this behavior and your furniture, your room and your house.
 

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Resource guarding of spaces is actually quite common. The easiest solution is to manage the space. I would use treats and positive reinforcement training to teach him "off", almost like teaching a trick. Teach him to only get on the couch when invited. Or teach him he can only be on his blanket on the couch. Something like that. Any time he is on the couch and someone is approaching, teach him that the person is awesome and he gets a treat for getting off the couching and staying on the ground, until the person sits down and he is (maybe) invited up.

Worst case scenario, maybe he doesn't get couch privileges at all if this is too much to handle.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks for the suggestions, but it may have actually been me that was being too protective of my family, lol. After 3 short sessions of counter-conditioning he greets both my wife and son with patient and happy tail wags. That was way too easy, and was more likely just breaking a bad habit of excited barks (he does get very vocal when excited). I am still keeping a close eye on it but I have tried multiple times to illicit the "guarding" response to get a video to analyze whether it was aggression, but every time he behaves and then hops on my wife's lap for cuddles once she sits. He's a bit more bouncy and excited with my son but still obviously non-aggressive. It is entirely possible the hugs were triggering him to think it was roughhousing time and he was just trying to join in. He has never snarled or shown any obvious danger signs through all of this, but I wanted to err on the side of caution with a 10 year old in the house. In fact his over-all behavior has been getting much, much better over the last few days because I have been so focused on his training and started using the clicker. He's even calmed down on some of the mouthing and ankle biting. He is no longer defiant with the "off" cue or in going to his pen. This morning he woke my wife up with some quiet polite whimpers and gentle pawing because he had to poop at 5:30 am, it was one of the cutest things he's ever done. He's usually much louder and more demanding. Now if I can stop him from trying to burrow in the sofa...

Anyway I will post an update after a few more days of keeping a close eye on this. Hopefully it was a false alarm. I'm still learning to speak his language.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I managed to get a video. Immediately after this video he went and got a chew toy and cuddled up next to my son. 10 minutes later my son got up and got ready for bed. We were still thinking he was just being playful, but when he came to say goodnight, the dog jumped up on my lap and started barking frustratedly and whimpering a bit, didn't even want to let my son near me. I wish professional help was an option but I live in S Korea and the only trainers anywhere near me are punitive based, dog psychology here is extremely behind the times. I am afraid just blocking him from the sofa will not solve the issue since the guarding has already moved to the bed, and he isn't even allowed up there. Keep in mind as well, he will only do this if I am on the sofa or bed (or my wife and I both in the case of my son) This is incredibly stressful and frustrating.


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Why are you and your son feeding and petting (rewarding) this dog for being on the sofa?

By rewarding the dog and allowing the dog to walk all over you and your son you have given the dog NO boundaries. That bite was not aggression.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Why are you and your son feeding and petting (rewarding) this dog for being on the sofa?

By rewarding the dog and allowing the dog to walk all over you and your son you have given the dog NO boundaries. That bite was not aggression.
Not sure where you get feeding from. He's not allowed to eat anything on the sofa. I wasn't able to use hand signals or remove him because I was recording. And I'm not rewarding him while he's misbehaving. If you listen to the video, I tell my son to stop petting him while he's acting up. I pet him and reward him when he calms down. I am trying to simultaneously train the dog and teach my son to handle the dog so I kind of have my hands full. This is a 6 month old adolescent so it's not surprising that he's being defiant. He has an "off" cue to get down off the sofa and normally waits for permission to come up so he definitely does have boundaries. Just because it isn't typical aggression doesn't mean it isn't guarding and won't turn into aggression. And after the video the bark and posture that I didn't record was more concerning, as well as how he acted toward my wife a bit later. Based on Jean Donaldson's book I didn't want to reinforce the guarding either so I'm stuck with all kinds of conflicting information. How about making some suggestions on what to do based on my explanation rather than making assumptions and being critical?
 

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Your son should probably stop inadvertently presenting his arms and hands as chew toys. And your dog needs INTERACTIVE play time, such as tug of war. ON THE FLOOR. With the inclusion of an off-switch where the toy gets kindly put away at the end of the play session. Not just 'go get your toy' and play with it alone while cuddling.

Overall, your dog should be spending the vast majority of his time on the floor, and should only be allowed on the couch ON OCCASION and only when invited.

Also, he should have at the bare minimum two commands, SOLIDLY in place. "Up" and "off". Not just 'normally' but always. Without exception. The golden rule of successful dog training is ALWAYS be consistent.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Your son should probably stop inadvertently presenting his arms and hands as chew toys. And your dog needs INTERACTIVE play time, such as tug of war. ON THE FLOOR. With the inclusion of an off-switch where the toy gets kindly put away at the end of the play session. Not just 'go get your toy' and play with it alone while cuddling.

Overall, your dog should be spending the vast majority of his time on the floor, and should only be allowed on the couch ON OCCASION and only when invited.

Also, he should have at the bare minimum two commands, SOLIDLY in place. "Up" and "off". Not just 'normally' but always. Without exception. The golden rule of successful dog training is ALWAYS be consistent.
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More assumptions. Well, we spent over an hour total playing tug and fetch together on the floor this morning, took 2 walks morning and evening, played some more fetch after work, spent 30 minutes doing some clicker training, sat together on the floor for an hour, then I let him on the sofa for some TV time about 20 minutes before that video was taken. I don't think more floor time is the answer. I agree about my son not presenting his hands that way, but since the dog doesn't usually do this he didn't know how to react yet. Also "up" and "off" are 100% reliable EXCEPT when he is acting up like this. Not sure if you missed it in my earlier post but he is also doing this when I am on the bed which he is NEVER allowed on.
 

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At 20 seconds it looked like the dog was being fed. I see now that your son is moving his hand, the dog is following it and and then mouthing. Mostly what I see is mouthing, not aggression. It appears to be play and (again) lack of boundaries. I simply would not allow the dog on the couch at all with people. Anyone. It is OK for a dog to not be on the furniture.

When I say there are no boundaries, I mean that the dog has no clarity from the people. IOW's the dog goes on the furniture when invited but also goes on (as in this video) when NOT invited. This is simply "grey" to an animal that thrives on being black and white. The dog has no understanding of personal space. This is all very common puppy behavior when the humans are not consistent and clear.

The best way to describe this is that there is no "maybe" or "sort of" in dog training. This does not mean harshness. It means being black and white. It means things like Sit means Sit until the dog is released from the command, the dog is given a different command or the dog dies sitting there (of course you would release the dog or give the dog a new job or command so the dog would not die LOL). Most pet owners are not clear or consistent. They tell the dog to sit, then a phone rings and they answer the phone.. the dog gets up and wanders off. The owner (most inadvertently) has just told the dog that sit means sit down until the dog is sick of sitting and can get up and wander off.

In this case, the dog jumps on the couch. It matters not WHY, it matters only that he does. Then he gets attention and petting. Your son (and again, this is just observation) sits on the couch and his hands become lures to the dog by the way he moves them away from and around the dog. The dog is a puppy and mouths the hands because the hands are now toys. The puppy does not respect human personal space (because no one has made this a priority). The puppy walks on the couch, your son and likely everything else in much the same way.

He is not a bad puppy and your son is not a bad child. They just don't know how to behave with each other and you, as an inexperienced handler, are not guiding either one in a clear manner with clear black and white boundaries.

Dogs thrive on black and white when they are being handled and trained. This means the trainer needs to remove the grey in the communication. I see a LOT of grey in your statements and in this video.

Approach the issue simply. NO dog on the furniture. Period. Not at this age and not at this time. That is clear. "Sometimes" on the furniture is grey to a puppy. Someday, when the dog is more advanced in training, and understands very clearly "up" and "off" and will maintain one or the other position perhaps the couch can be added back in.

Right now you have a puppy. You may have understanding but you do not have duration (like a toddler). Some of the time you probably do not even have complete understanding (again, lack of clarity on the part of the people involved).

Go back to basics. No more couch time. When the dog is off the couch, play is OK. Petting is ok. Another command such as sit and rewarding that is OK. Expect the puppy to act like a puppy.

NOTHING I see here is aggression. It is mostly exuberance and play and a lack of clarity and consistent boundaries. the dog is pretty much doing whatever he wants. He will love you more if you are consistent and clear. He will prefer it.
 

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There is another management tool that works well with puppies. That is a Time Out in a crate.

If you play with the puppy, take him out for a walk, bring him back, play some MORE and THEN you get this behavior it is very likely your puppy is over tired. It is VERY common for a puppy to become over tired and exhibit that by being over stimulated.

A time out can be very valuable and the puppy may become much calmer after an hour or two "off" in a crate.

One other thing.. a dog at 6 months old is not adolescent in the head. He is a puppy. Adolescence is around 14-18 months old and that is a whole different world.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
There is another management tool that works well with puppies. That is a Time Out in a crate.

If you play with the puppy, take him out for a walk, bring him back, play some MORE and THEN you get this behavior it is very likely your puppy is over tired. It is VERY common for a puppy to become over tired and exhibit that by being over stimulated.

A time out can be very valuable and the puppy may become much calmer after an hour or two "off" in a crate.
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You may have a very good point. He didn't take a nap today aside from an hour this morning while I was at the gym and the 2 hours I was gone for work (if he even napped during those times). I don't use his pen for time outs because I read that gives a negative association with what is supposed to be his safe space, but as a non-punitive time out, it is probably a good idea. I literally only restrict his access to the house when nobody is home.

3GSD4IPO I'm not worried about him being on the sofa unless this is resource guarding, but as you say if it is play and is getting out of hand it may be necessary too. There seems to be a lot of "gray" because he is normally VERY well behaved, and my normal tactics are suddenly failing. I'm just concerned about the behavior he has started exhibiting toward my wife and son since last week, and the sudden personality change (hormones from neutering?). I am trying to figure out if it is guarding or not because the training will be different and I don't want to make things worse. And by the way, he will sit for me with any high value treat directly in front of him until I release him (though he starts letting me know he's getting frustrated by growly whimpers if it is too long) ? Here is another video of him reacting to my wife, this was followed by him appearing to try and physically block her from getting to me and giving what I interpreted as a hard stare. This is all new behavior so I absolutely may be misinterpreting it. Could it be that he is just trying to demand their attention? It seems to happen most right before they go to bed. https://youtu.be/E2xHDspXGQ8
 

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You may have a very good point. He didn't take a nap today aside from an hour this morning while I was at the gym and the 2 hours I was gone for work (if he even napped during those times). I don't use his pen for time outs because I read that gives a negative association with what is supposed to be his safe space, but as a non-punitive time out, it is probably a good idea. I literally only restrict his access to the house when nobody is home.
You may need to change this so he can have a "time out" place that is all his own. It is not negative to have a crate. It works like a den once you do a bit of crate games and crate training.

3GSD4IPO I'm not worried about him being on the sofa unless this is resource guarding, but as you say if it is play and is getting out of hand it may be necessary too. There seems to be a lot of "gray" because he is normally VERY well behaved, and my normal tactics are suddenly failing. I'm just concerned about the behavior he has started exhibiting toward my wife and son since last week, and the sudden personality change (hormones from neutering?). I am trying to figure out if it is guarding or not because the training will be different and I don't want to make things worse. And by the way, he will sit for me with any high value treat directly in front of him until I release him (though he starts letting me know he's getting frustrated by growly whimpers if it is too long) �� Here is another video of him reacting to my wife, this was followed by him appearing to try and physically block her from getting to me and giving what I interpreted as a hard stare. This is all new behavior so I absolutely may be misinterpreting it. Could it be that he is just trying to demand their attention? It seems to happen most right before they go to bed. https://youtu.be/E2xHDspXGQ8
You are not understanding what I am trying to say. The object of keeping him off the couch is NOT about the couch. It is about giving him clear boundaries and letting him know there are places he is not allowed to go.

He is a BABY PUPPY and you are over thinking ALL of this.

Simplify all of this. Get a crate. Put the puppy to bed before you all go to bed. Give him his OWN space. He needs that just like we all need a place we can be alone for a bit. TOO much togetherness can be too much pressure on a dog.

As your puppy grows, your training techniques will have to grow as well. The thing you do and get results with at 3 months will be different at 13 months.

That video.. the dog is giving attention. Then the person dangles their hand in front of the puppies face and mouth INVITING him to view the hands as chew toys. I would have clicked and quickly FED that attentive look. It is wonderful attention and it was not rewarded. That was an ideal training opportunity and the person blew it!! Instead.. the dog got hands dangled in front of his face and the dog had NO IDEA what to do so he did what dogs do.. he explored the hands with his mouth.

You have a REALLY GOOD puppy here. Be clear with him. Stop the hand dangling and the creepy slow movements around him.. he does not understand any of that. Be prepared to mark and reward good behavior when it is offered. Toy. Ball. Food.

It is RARE to get such a nice dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks for the advice. Those videos were set up to intentionally entice his naughty behavior for analysis and he normally knows better than to mouth hands, but I guess he was just having little tantrums because he wanted their focus so bad. That said, you are right, they do need to be taught not to make their hands a play target. I do have a crate inside his playpen, I just have avoided using it for punishment. Also he does have boundaries, and isn't allowed on the bed or in the bathrooms but was allowed freely on the sofas until his behavior started freaking me out. I should take some videos of him being good ?

He had an outburst this morning and I had my son grab a toy at which point the dog seemed totally elated because we finally understood what he was trying to communicate. The next time he did it, instead of going for hands he ran and got a toy and presented it to my son.

He really is a great dog, you should see the list of tricks he's got down. He was actually fetching and placing a toy in my hand since 5 weeks old, it took 2 tries to teach him to do that. His behavior is ridiculously good usually, which is why I was so freaked out by the sudden outbursts. I'm so relieved it isn't resource guarding but also feel a bit foolish. I had a severe dog phobia until I was a teenager and wouldn't even go outside for fear of a loose dog, I think the barking triggered that a bit. I grew to love dogs and had one once I got over my fear. I think it was rooted in my best friend Murphy (my parents mutt when I was born) biting my landlord (real resource guarding) and had to be put to sleep when I was 3 ?
 

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I wrote a reply and then hit some key on the keyboard and it vanished. I am redoing this because it is important.
Please read this with an open mind. I am not bashing you. I am trying to get understanding.


Thanks for the advice. Those videos were set up to intentionally entice his naughty behavior for analysis and he normally knows better than to mouth hands, but I guess he was just having little tantrums because he wanted their focus so bad.
He is NOT HAVING TANTRUMS. NEVER set your dog up to fail. Even for an illustrative video. That is a bit mean. I know you are trying to make a point but it is unfair to the dog and simply reinforces what you do not want.

That said, you are right, they do need to be taught not to make their hands a play target. I do have a crate inside his playpen, I just have avoided using it for punishment. Also he does have boundaries, and isn't allowed on the bed or in the bathrooms but was allowed freely on the sofas until his behavior started freaking me out. I should take some videos of him being good ?
The issue is he is good. He is good even when you think he is not. He is trying his best to communicate to you. You are not hearing him.

Imagine it this way. You go to a Foreign country. You do not understand the language. No one speaks your language. Add to this that they do not have the same body language of your homeland and what they do is very opposite of what you understand. You do things and they talk to you. You cannot understand so you do things with a little more force. They still do not understand. You finally yell (bark) out of frustration. They admonish you and still do not understand. Finally you slap someone lightly. You don't hurt them. Now they label you as deranged and bring in a psychiatrist and medication. Meanwhile all you were trying to do is understand.... THAT is what is going on between your family and this really smart puppy.

He had an outburst this morning and I had my son grab a toy at which point the dog seemed totally elated because we finally understood what he was trying to communicate. The next time he did it, instead of going for hands he ran and got a toy and presented it to my son.
FINALLY someone showed him (the dog) and he found a way to communicate. Do this. Every. Time. Get a toy. Engage him in play. He is focusing on you all and you are misunderstanding.

He really is a great dog, you should see the list of tricks he's got down. He was actually fetching and placing a toy in my hand since 5 weeks old, it took 2 tries to teach him to do that. His behavior is ridiculously good usually, which is why I was so freaked out by the sudden outbursts. I'm so relieved it isn't resource guarding but also feel a bit foolish. I had a severe dog phobia until I was a teenager and wouldn't even go outside for fear of a loose dog, I think the barking triggered that a bit. I grew to love dogs and had one once I got over my fear. I think it was rooted in my best friend Murphy (my parents mutt when I was born) biting my landlord (real resource guarding) and had to be put to sleep when I was 3 ?
You need to learn about dogs. This dog? There are competitive obedience people who would give their eye teeth for a dog that is this naturally focused and engaged.

You are clearly academic. You are clearly interested in learning. Please get these books and read them.. Both.. All the way through.

1.) The Other End of the Leash by Patrica McConnell.
2.) As a Dog Thinketh by Monique Anstee

Also, go and read Monique's blogs at "The Naughty Dogge" (her dogs are NOT naughty and each blog is short and very clear).

Meanwhile, when your dog look at someone like he did with the video with your wife, REWARD that. Toss him a toy. Engage him in play. Stop the hand waving around his face. That reminds me of a snake charmer... The moves are what we call "creepy" in my dog training group. Everything you do with this dog needs to be CLEAR. That means black and white. Keep it simple. Don't over think it. He is a DOG and not a child!!

Yes, he has learned tricks and is doing all sorts of things and that is very cool. Now you need to build on that as he matures. Do not expect him to be the perfect dog all the time. Remember he is a PUPPY and puppies need play time, training time and they need alone time. They need to learn things. Some of those things may seem uncomfortable at first (like staying in a crate while everyone is in the house) but the in the end your dog will thank you for it.

GOOD LUCK
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
@3GSD4IPO Thank you for the well thought out and constructive input. I felt I had no choice but to instigate the behavior in order to diagnose the issue, "mean" as it may be. If I had the option here in Korea of behavior classes or hiring a modern trainer I would have certainly done that instead.

I will check out those resources. So far I have read two Victoria Stillwell books, and "Mine!" by Jean Donaldson along with countless hours of video and podcasts. I liked the articles I've read by Patricia McConnell so I am eager to read that book. I am literally doing as much as I can to educate myself on this. It frustrates me how much outdated and junk science I had to weed through to get to the good stuff. That led to a lot of analysis paralysis that stunted our training, and still leads me to uncertainty with so much conflicting advice. It is also difficult having a wife who has never had a pet and a 10 year old unknowingly undermining much of my training, in essence making more than twice the work. I'm training myself and them to train the dog, and then untraining undesired outcomes that we have reinforced. I am just glad it only took me a couple weeks to realize the entire "dominance" philosophy is BS.

It really breaks my heart that such a wonderful animal was set to be destroyed, I really wish I could have saved his siblings as well ? I guess it is possible someone adopted them but the adoption numbers here are pretty grim. Keep in mind this is a country that still farms dogs for meat, so many people view them like livestock.
 

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@3GSD4IPO Thank you for the well thought out and constructive input. I felt I had no choice but to instigate the behavior in order to diagnose the issue, "mean" as it may be. If I had the option here in Korea of behavior classes or hiring a modern trainer I would have certainly done that instead.

I will check out those resources. So far I have read two Victoria Stillwell books, and "Mine!" by Jean Donaldson along with countless hours of video and podcasts. I liked the articles I've read by Patricia McConnell so I am eager to read that book. I am literally doing as much as I can to educate myself on this. It frustrates me how much outdated and junk science I had to weed through to get to the good stuff. That led to a lot of analysis paralysis that stunted our training, and still leads me to uncertainty with so much conflicting advice. It is also difficult having a wife who has never had a pet and a 10 year old unknowingly undermining much of my training, in essence making more than twice the work. I'm training myself and them to train the dog, and then untraining undesired outcomes that we have reinforced. I am just glad it only took me a couple weeks to realize the entire "dominance" philosophy is BS.

It really breaks my heart that such a wonderful animal was set to be destroyed, I really wish I could have saved his siblings as well �� I guess it is possible someone adopted them but the adoption numbers here are pretty grim. Keep in mind this is a country that still farms dogs for meat, so many people view them like livestock.
Be very aware that there ARE dogs that can be dominant (yours is not one). A TRULY dominant dog is typically a strong working line breed (such as a very well bred working line GSD). Such a dog needs clear structure in its raising and clear black and white type training. Such a dog would be a bad fit in your house and such a dog usually is not a good pet. When a dog like this ends up in the wrong hands, the dog can end up running the show and the owners just are "over dogged." I have known of 5 such dogs. Their breeders took them back. In EVERY case training was attempted and structure added to the dog's life (NO yank and crank but structure such as crating, kenneling and nothing in life is free). About day three every one of these dogs turned into a very dangerous animal. They had been running the show for 5 years and were not going to accept the change.

In all but one case the dogs were euthanized. Dogs in their prime. Beautiful dogs..that would have lived fine if the pet homes had returned them sooner or had simply learned how to be clear with the dog and how to be structured (crating, boundaries, impulse control and so forth).

Your dog is NOT that. I see a happy dog that desires engagement with all of you and a dog that is really trying to understand. When he mouths and acts like you don't want, the FIRST thing is to back off and think about why your behavior is confusing the dog. From what I see hand and arm movements slowly waving around are the biggest issue. Put hands in pockets and kick a ball or a toy and see how that goes.

I trained horses for years and there is a saying; Green horse and a green rider make a bad color combination. Green meaning inexperienced.

I think that if you institute some rules such as no dog on the furniture (for now.. maybe not forever) and treat the dog more like a dog and have your family do likewise you will move ahead. Again, don't overthink things. Dogs are pretty simple. They will repeat a behavior (good or bad) if it is rewarded OR if they find the behavior self rewarding. They will let you know if they don't understand (and your dog is clear about this if everyone will listen). Dogs like sure movements from people. They like to eat food by themselves (we are like that too.. we would get testy if someone put their hand in our food yet the latest 'thing' is a dog should accept this.. WHY? Leave the dog alone when he is eating).

Last, but certainly not least, a dog's behavior is mostly based in its genetics. You see it in my sport all the time. If dog behavior was NOT based in genetics, we would not have breeds of dogs that do specific tasks (such as herding, livestock guardian, tracking, hunting game etc.). Your dog is a mix of those genes and from the short videos I saw you lucked out and got a really nice little dog. Plus he is pretty.
 
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