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I just lost my Son/Jack Russell Terrior BINGO last Monday. I know I'll be getting another pup in a year or so in honor of my Boy! I'm not super active, but I do love to walk an hour or so daily, love to fish, camp, hike and spend alot of quality time with my dogs. I'm looking for a pup/dog who is intelligent, easy to train/ loves to learn, mainly a one person:but family dog (excellent protector a +). One that loves to go swimming with their human and car riding. Preferred 50 and above lbs, sex isn't a big issue, a buddy to hang out with and love spending time with me. My picks probably in order Border Collie, Australian Shepherd, Golden Retriever/Labrador Retriever, German Shepherd and Shetland Sheepdog. Any advise would be appreciated!
 

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I just lost my Son/Jack Russell Terrior BINGO last Monday. I know I'll be getting another pup in a year or so in honor of my Boy! I'm not super active, but I do love to walk an hour or so daily, love to fish, camp, hike and spend alot of quality time with my dogs. I'm looking for a pup/dog who is intelligent, easy to train/ loves to learn, mainly a one person:but family dog (excellent protector a +). One that loves to go swimming with their human and car riding. Preferred 50 and above lbs, sex isn't a big issue, a buddy to hang out with and love spending time with me. My picks probably in order Border Collie, Australian Shepherd, Golden Retriever/Labrador Retriever, German Shepherd and Shetland Sheepdog. Any advise would be appreciated!
A boxer...
 

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Most dogs would probably be fine with a one hour daily walk. I will say the Border Collies or Australian Shepherds might need a bit more mental stimulation on top of that, though, such as a structured game of fetch with "rules" they have to follow or a session of obedience training, especially as young adults.

Also note, poorly bred Border Collies and Australian Shepherds can often have some degree of "stranger danger" or reactivity, which sometimes makes them difficult to take into public spaces or any space where you might encounter other people or animals. Breed standard is "sensibly reserved with strangers" (meaning they want nothing to do with them, but are not fearful), but sometimes when breeders aren't paying attention it swings too far into "afraid of strangers." If you decide on either breed, make sure to thoroughly vet a breeder who pays close attention to temperament, and make sure they understand what you plan to do with the dog so they can match you appropriately. There are many "flavors" (for example, there's incredibly high drive working lines, and lower drive lines ideal for the weekend warrior or casual performance handler) of both breeds, and selecting a breeder who matches your taste is important!

Goldens and Labs are almost always great family companions, very forgiving, and generally a safe bet to have a stable temperament if you want to adopt from a shelter instead of going through a breeder. Again, you have your field (working) lines and the casual pet lines. Pick your flavor. Just be aware of health concerns typical of the breed, like cancer in Goldens.

German Shepherds would be great, too, but poorly bred dogs can have some of the same issues as poorly bred BCs or Aussies, not to mention the health issues. Selecting a good breeder is important.

Shetland Sheepdogs top out at around 30 pounds, so that is smaller than your preferred weight. They are also prone to some of the herding dog issues I described above.
 

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I agree that a good Golden or Lab is a wonderful match for what you're looking for.

A rough collie (think Lassie) or smooth collie (the shorter coat version of the breed) might be a better fit for your criteria than a sheltie (they're in the right size range too). Like any herder they can be on the sensitive side, but are generally less intense that way than borders or aussies. As with any breed known for their intelligence, you do have to be on top of keeping their brain active and engaged with training, games, puzzle toys, etc. as well as meeting their physical needs, but collies have a reputation as a wonderful family dog for a reason.

With any dog you choose, if you're going with a puppy make sure you vet the breeder thoroughly, and that their breeding goals align with what you want in a dog. For example, you could get a German Shepherd from an excellent breeder who does everything right, but who focuses on breeding dogs for police work and bite sports - these lines tend to be much more intense and high energy than what you want! So find someone focusing on producing dogs who are great family companions with excellent genetic health (this involves tests and screening way beyond 'the vet said my dogs are healthy') and stable temperaments. Definitely meet at least the mother of the litter, and the father or any other close relations if possible to get the best idea of what your puppy is likely to be like as an adult - no one can guarantee a puppy will grow up to be exactly like their parents, but you can definitely rule out a litter if the mom seems anxious, excessively shy, stressed out, etc.

Adult dogs, whether you rescue or buy an older dog from a breeder (sometimes a pup gets returned, or doesn't work out for what the breeder had planned, or gets retired from breeding and needs a home), are a little more 'what you see is what you get', but don't be afraid to ask questions about the dog's history, behaviors, and quirks. Some rescues/shelters allow you to take a dog home on a trial basis, where you can return them within a certain time frame if they don't mesh with your family.
 

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A Lab or Golden sounds like a good fit. I've got a friend who loves her her show line Labrador, and another friend who loves her working/field line Labradors.

Border Collies can be... interesting... to live with. A lot of them can lovely pets, given enough mental and physical work, some can be high strung, tightly wound dogs, and some can be downright neurotic.

Australian Shepherds can be along the same lines as the BC.

GSD have so many lines and types to choose from.... My girl has the look of being from West German show lines. There are also American show lines and several different working lines. Temperaments range from bombproof to nervous and shy.

Shelties..... well, how much do you like to hear barking? I've never known one that wasn't very vocal, and some of them never seem to shut up.

A boxer...
Another breed I love, but probably won't ever get due to cardio issues.
 

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Goldens and labs are classic go anywhere, do anything breeds for good reason. If you get one from a breeder, make sure the parents passed all the recommended OFA screenings.
 

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Shelties..... well, how much do you like to hear barking? I've never known one that wasn't very vocal, and some of them never seem to shut up.
Oh, god. I thought my dog was vocal. Then I met Shelties. Although I met them at an agility trial, and they were quiet in their crates.
 
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