Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning everyone,

I'm looking to get a new family dog. Our lab passed away almost a year ago, and we're finally settled into a new house.

My neighbor had a Great Pyrenees and I fell in love this dog. Such a beautiful and sweet dog. But after reading a little about how much they bark, I'm not sure a Great Pyrenees would be a good fit for us (or our neighbors. lol).

So my question is, are there other medium to large breeds that have a similar temperaments but with less barking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
Yeah. Sometimes I think it's wiser to fall in love with a breed, as a whole, including all of their pro's and con's, rather than basing our appreciation on one particular dog of any given breed. Dogs just aren't carbon copies, of course.

You might want to look into Bernese Mountain Dogs. They're probably less "barky" than a Pyr, especially at night. Other suggestions would be St Bernard, Golden Retriever, and Newfoundland Dog.

Also. If you're looking for *beautiful and sweet*, then the sire and dam of the puppy you plan to acquire should be given tremendous consideration, regardless of whatever breed you finally decide on. It's not a guarantee but it'll increase the odds greatly.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,919 Posts
What specifically about your neighbor's dog appeals to you? Great Pyrs were originally livestock guardian dogs, and many are still bred for this purpose. These dogs can be sweet with their owners, but can be very aloof and wary with strangers, and protective of their territory. They also aren't necessarily terribly biddable - by which I mean they aren't easy to train because they are more independent thinkers than a dog who wants to please you. It sounds like your neighbor's dog might be from more 'pet bred' lines, with a softer, more easy-going temperament, but if you give us more details we can better guide you towards breeds that fit your needs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We lived in an apartment and I would always see my neighbor's dog peeking out of the windows. He was a beautiful dog that just looked so fluffy and hug-able. About a week before we moved out I passed them as they were going for a walk. I asked if I could pet him and he was extremely friendly and seemed to like me and the kids as much as I liked him. He was so happy to finally meet us. I asked what kind of dog he was because I have never seen one like him and he said he was a mixed Great Pyrenees and Anatolian Shepherd. I had to look up both of those breed as I had never heard of them. He looked more like a Great Pyrenees than Anatolian. Either way, I really wanted one just like him.

My last dog was an awesome dog too. Merlin was a black lab that lived to be almost 16 y/o. I think if I get another lab I would just feel like I was replacing Merlin and there is no replacement for him.

So here we are in our new house. It's about 2500sqft but the yard is pretty small which makes the neighbors pretty close. I did a lot of reading today and found out that Great Pyrenees bark a lot. Particularly at night. I never noticed it but my wife would complain that our neighbors dog barked constantly. I wrote it off as the neighbors never seemed to be home but I don't want to run in to an issue where I'm forced to re-home a dog because of neighbors complaining. I also found the Bernese, Great Bernese, and Newfoundland, but I live in Florida and from what I've read, none of those breeds do well in warmer climates. I seem to fall in love with all the big fluffy ones uuuugh. On a side note, when I met my neighbor and his dog, I did ask about having such a big fluffy dog in Florida and he said that he does fine.

There are a lot of dog breeds out there, and I'm a newb when it comes to them. So I figured I'd ask people with more experience about breeds with similar temperaments.

thank you!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
There's also a couple of kennels breeding a snow white version of golden retrievers. Met a few from the same kennel, up in north carolina I believe it was, they seemed like great dogs and their owners were very happy with them. Long snow white hair, seemed to have really nice temperaments.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,339 Posts
Great Pyrenees can be very guard-y and territorial. They're affectionate with family, but they may want nothing to do with strangers or strange dogs. Resource guarding can be an issue, especially with other dogs. It depends tremendously on the breeder. You will want to choose a breeder who breeds 'pet' dogs rather than dogs bred to work. They're also incredibly independent and can be difficult to train. They're nearly on the other end of the spectrum in biddability compared to a Lab.

If you're looking for sweet and fluffy, try a Golden. They're some of the most adorkable, easy-going, and fluffy dogs out there!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,919 Posts
Leonbergers are certainly on the easygoing, friendly, and biddable end of the spectrum when it comes to mastiffs! You still want to make sure the parents have the temperament you want, and that the breeder can and will help you select a puppy with the best personality for your household. My MiL's male leo is a great dog, but he's already showing signs of being wary of strange men, and she's had a female in the past that took a dislike to bicycles, so some of those aloof guarding tendencies are still in the breed, just so you know. Goldens are also brilliant people-loving, family friendly dogs for the most part. Like any popular breed (well, any breed but popular ones have a lot of poor breeders just in it for the money), you want to vet your breeder carefully so you know they're treating health and temperament with utmost importance.

As for a fluffy dog in Florida, you'll probably have to put in some extra work. The dog absolutely needs to be an indoor dog, so it can stay in climate-controlled (or at least well-insulated) conditions with easy access to water. Regular grooming helps a lot, because double-coated dogs can have dead hair build up in their undercoat, which makes it harder to cool off. And, of course, you'd want to avoid exercise in the hottest parts of the day or in extreme weather. But there's lots of helpful options these days: cooling beds and cooling coats among them. So if you're willing to make some accommodations, a fluffy pup isn't totally out of the picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I haven't heard of Leonbergers before. I'll add that to my research list. A goldy may be the best choice for us and our location but I'm not giving up on big and fluffy yet. lol. I will definitely take into account the things like cooling blankets and bed and look into those as well. I don't mind the extra work of a fluffier companion but if I got a barker and my neighbors started to complain, that wouldn't be good. LoL, and it seems like we just had a couple of sour-pusses move in next door.

Thank you everyone for all of the advice! I really appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
Reading what you are saying I suggest a Golden Retriever which is very similar to a Labrador in temperament but quite different looking. They are usually biddable and friendly and like to be around kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OMG, I looked up Leonbergers yesterday and what a beautiful fluffy dog. Now I want one of those too. If I was reading correctly, they come in even bigger then the Pyre and Newfie. Wow!!

A goldy may be where it's at for us.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,919 Posts
The males particularly can get quite large, yes. Though you have to remember that a giant adult also means a giant puppy. I came home with bruises when we were last at my MiL's to visit, because at 5 months her leo was bigger than most labs! But with all the clumsiness and excitability you'd expect from a pup that age, haha.

Goldens are awesome dogs. If you need tips about how to find a good, reputable breeder who's breeding for healthy dogs with stable temperaments, feel free to ask here. There's also a 'sticky' thread at the top of the general forum that has lots of good info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Bouvier, bouvier, bouvier. .....therapy dogs, family dogs, police dogs. ..... Their activity level isn’t high. I describe them as a giant schnauzer but twice as wide....but they have no terrier in them which makes them more calm...in fact very calm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
I know your looking at huge and fluffy but my one question is how are you and your wife with drool?

While Leonbergers can be bigger than a Newfie, there generally not. Leonbergers are generally the 100 to 150 range, a 180+ newfie is pretty common.
As far a huge dogs go English Mastiff then Saint Bernard/Tibetan Mastiff then Newfie past these 4 it's pretty wide open. (this is weight not height).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
While Leonbergers can be bigger than a Newfie, there generally not. Leonbergers are generally the 100 to 150 range, a 180+ newfie is pretty common.
Newfie's should also be in the 100 to 150 range. Unfortunately, there are breeders breeding for giant size, but I would not consider them reputable. With the giant size comes giant health problems. With Newfs, temperament and health should always be the first things a breeder breeds for.

(Incidentally, if you do look into Newfs, I would suggest a breeder who keeps the pups until at least 10 weeks and has their hearts checked at 10 weeks by a vet cardiologist)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Newfie's should also be in the 100 to 150 range. Unfortunately, there are breeders breeding for giant size, but I would not consider them reputable. With the giant size comes giant health problems. With Newfs, temperament and health should always be the first things a breeder breeds for.

(Incidentally, if you do look into Newfs, I would suggest a breeder who keeps the pups until at least 10 weeks and has their hearts checked at 10 weeks by a vet cardiologist)
It's been almost 1.5 year since I gave up on finding a reputable newf breeder, honestly (well, I found some, but they didn't get back to me or didn't have any breeding planned). Easy to find backyard breeders of them though... sadly. That being said, it might have been a good thing, considering how much work already it is to deal with my eskie/husky shedding... but I'm still in love with the breed and I hope I can find one someday.

I looked into Bernese Mountain Dogs but decided against it because of their short lifespan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I’m a Golden Retriever fan. I have an 8 year old name Rocco and he has been such a great dog. They are sweet, beautiful, friendly, goofy, loving and loyal. I could go on and on. You could not go wrong with a Golden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
Newfie's should also be in the 100 to 150 range. Unfortunately, there are breeders breeding for giant size, but I would not consider them reputable. With the giant size comes giant health problems. With Newfs, temperament and health should always be the first things a breeder breeds for.

(Incidentally, if you do look into Newfs, I would suggest a breeder who keeps the pups until at least 10 weeks and has their hearts checked at 10 weeks by a vet cardiologist)
I agree most are breeding for size and it's not a good thing for the breed.
Saint Bernards seem to have the same trend over the last 10 or 15 years.

Seems shorter coated giant breeds are starting to work to healthier lines, while longer coated a suffering from strictly size breeding.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top