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Hello I am hoping to get some advice as to what I can do about my dog Percy. He is about 3-4 years old fully blind pitbull/boxer mix. I adopted him a year ago and he has been such a joy but also a daily challenge. He is very high energy and when he greets me coming home or anyone who comes over he gets extremely excited and has to jump on them because he likes for people to bend down and give him hugs. He LOVES hugs and although its adorable he can scratch the hell out of you and is just all around too rough when he plays...I basically own an adult cougar in my house lol. I really need help training him with both this as well as walking. He has a harness but he is just always so intense and constantly pulling me when he walks if there are a lot of sounds and dogs barking because he can hear but cant see around him. Since I've had him he has become more aggressive with dogs.*He loves people and does fine with my other dog but anytime I try to introduce him to another dog, especially a high energy one like himself he tries to full on lunge at them and attack although he's on a leash so can't get to them. I would really like to get help with these issues because he is such a lovable dog and I want to be able to take him out more and share him with people with out leaving scars on their arms. I do not have training with blind dogs so any helpful tips specific to that disability is appreciated.
 

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Multiple behaviors to address. Best handled 1 at a time.

In my simple mind, the jumping when greeting needs to be high priority. First, keep his nails trimmed. Now, the training. When you arrive home, do not speak or touch the dog. Ignore him until he settles down. When he is calm, then you can give him attention. His "reward" for the jumping is all the hugs he receives. Do not give reward for unwanted behavior. Instruct your guests to ignore the dog until he is calm, then give attention.

Do the same when feeding him. NO food until he is calm. Trust his senses, he knows by hearing and smell what is happening. He will learn to be calm to receive what he wants.

The walking will be a long trail. When he begins to pull, just stop, change direction. Use your verbal commands. You may need to shift from a harness to a collar. Some dogs tend to pull wearing a harness.

Yes, I would use the same training with him as a sighted dog. Generally, a dog's vision is not that acute unless it is a sight hound. What we see clearly at 80 feet, a dog will see clearly around 20 foot. Their primary senses are smell and hearing.

Dogs are intelligent. He will understand. Treats can be rewarded for good results. Please, please do not punish for bad results. Simply no reward for bad results.

I would avoid introduction to other dogs until he has learned to be calm and allow you to be the lead. Right now, the dog has control.
 

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I have lived with a fully blind dog for several years. She had lost both eyes, guessing in a fight with another animal based on her scars and was picked up as a stray by Animal Services. There's not much out there on living with blind dogs, so here are a few things I've learned along the way:

She relies more on her hearing than scent to follow things, so lure/reward training is not as quick as with sighted dogs. Supplementing the verbal commands with light touch, marking the right move with "yes", and rewarding with food, helped her learn the basics (sit, down, etc.).

At first, I got an ankle bracelet for me that I could hang a cat bell on, and wore that constantly. It helped with leash walking - kept her from crossing in front of me - and with her knowing when to move out of my way in the house. I now only wear it when leash walking her. I also put a bell on her, mostly for the other dogs. She has a tendency to bump into them!

I still need to use the leash to guide her out of the way of things on walks, so I keep it short enough to be able to put a little pressure on it when I need to, but most of the time she now walks beside me on a loose leash.

She has learned that when I say "curb" it means she needs to feel for a step up or down.

She was very reactive to other dogs, so I always carried high-value treats with me (still do, just don't need them now). Putting one in front of her nose gets her attention, moving away if more distance was needed. It didn't take long for her to learn that dog equals treat. BUT, (this is important!) dogs also need to SEE each other to judge reactions. So I never let her greet another dog unless I KNOW the other dog is bomb-proof! (I don't take the other person's word for it.) The other dog doesn't know that mine can't see, and mine can't adjust her reactions based on what the other dog does, so there's always room for miscommunication between the two dogs that can turn bad. That said, she lives with another dog, and goes on pack walks with other dogs. I just have to do intros slow, and watch her and the other dogs for clues on when (if) to let them greet and when to move away. She now trusts me to do that, so much so that she passed her CGC (AKC Canine Good Citizens) test last year.

I also have "landing pads" throughout the house - small non-skid bath mats - that she can use to orient herself. Furniture might get moved, the pads don't.

I think she uses some echo-location to help her not bump into walls, because she’s good at avoiding hard surfaces if she’s paying attention. She can’t however, avoid screens – will walk right into them - so beware if you have screen doors.

She doesn't automatically dog paddle when in a pool, and would probably drown, so I've restricted access to the one in my yard.

I have ramps to any of the furniture she's allowed on, and she's learned to find those. I came home one day to find her on the living room coffee table, stuck there because going up is much less frightening than going down. She now knows that if there's a ramp, its ok to get on.

Since she can’t see me coming, I warn her ahead of time if I’m going to pick her up or put her down (I use “up” “down”), and before I put something like a harness or collar over her head (I use “nose”, for "put your nose in here").

And I've had to be mindful of leaving the dishwasher door open (she'll plow right into it because it's not supposed to be there). Same with closet doors.

Sound games are fun. Tossing a piece of kibble on a tile floor gives her a sound to “find it”. Same with snuffle mats - she gets to use her nose.

Bottom line is that she will learn just like any dog. She'll just use her paws, hearing, and nose a bit more, so get creative and work with those senses when teaching her skills. Good luck, and bless you for taking her in!
 

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To give you an idea to curb the jumping when you return....

I have a MiniS, who is alone in my home while I'm at work. So, when I return he is a ball of furry excitement. He does jump, but I turn away and go about my business without giving any attention to him or speaking. I change my clothes, do a little clean up if needed and other chores, after a few minutes he has calmed down. He only jumps 1 or 2 times, then he begins to speak to me with the "language" that Schnauzers use. A mixed combination of growls, grumbles, half bark/howl, aroos........ I just ignore him talking to me. He will run around tossing toys about, but he settles in short while. He typically will sit on my bed waiting for me to say "Hello".

The ritual is a bit comical, but here it is. I stand at the foot of the bed, he stands on rear legs to place his front paws on my chest. I scratch his sides and pet his head and ask about his day. When this is finished, I will place my forearms on the bed with my head between. He will lay down in a similar position to where we are nose to nose. I continue the pets, then he will roll over for belly scratch/rub with a chin stroke. This whole "Hello" lasts maybe 2-3 minutes. Then the "pack" is reunited and evening life begins.
 

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One more idea to help with the pawing- use a flat object, like a clipboard or slick cutting board, to put in between her paws and whatever she is pawing (you?). Say “enough” or “that will do” (or whatever command you want to use) as she drops down from pawing the slick surface. Treat her when all four are on the floor. This has worked with my girl - she can’t see it, and isn’t getting the tactile feedback that reinforces the pawing of skin! So she stops.
 
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