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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had a dog in my childhood, and then again in early 20s. The first one was a cocker spaniel. The second one was a 4-year-old rescue (lived to 14 years old). Both of these experiences were mostly amazing (especially with the rescue), and I couldn't wait to get another dog. Now I finally have a spacious apartment, good finances and I mostly work from home.

A few years ago, I saw Beagle Freedom Project videos and they left me heartbroken and in love with the beagles, so - even though we were waiting for our local shelter to get dogs (in our area, there is a waiting list at the shelter) - when my husband ran across people who had a litter of beagles that they were giving away (no pedigree, but I don't care about that), we took one.

This time, I knew stuff that I didn't even bother to know with the first two dogs. I researched everything: training methods and approaches, ways to deal with the new dog; I bought a crate, chew toys, enzyme cleaners, EVERYTHING. We have been doing everything BY THE BOOK for two months now. And, please, don't stress how this is still a puppy etc. I understand that. But I had dogs; my friends had dogs, I know they're not all the same, I just don't know what to do anymore. We made NO PROGRESS. Nothing. Zero. Every day I hope something got better, but nope.

Our male beagle can sit, stay, lie down on command (he does it for treats). So he's not stupid or too small to understand. He has a crate, and we made it his happy place (fake mom with the clock and heating pads, toys, etc.). It has a divider that we enlarge so that it's big enough for him to lie down comfortably, but not bigger. I walk him every hour to 2 hours during the day, and we realized that he can go for 7 hours at night.

So, let me describe this day and you tell me how not to get exasperated:
all day long: walks every 1-2 hours - upon taking him out of the crate, after playtime
he gets plenty of play time and exercise (my job is suffering so much that this might have a huge impact on my career if this continues, I'm devoting most of my time to this)
he sees other dogs (when not during the walks, he goes to the puppy day care to socialize)
he eats well, he's healthy (saw the vet and had a 2-hour 180 dollar check up)
my husband and I are consistent and very determined to make this work

Today, he was walked and he peed at 8 pm. We then played with him for 30 min, crated him. He peed in his crate 20 min later (this is a new thing, so I feel that we're regressing).

We caught him in the act, said no, replaced the blankets, washed everything with an enzyme cleaner, took him outside immediately, praised him for peeing there.

So, he was out at 9 pm, then 10 pm, and we also restricted the water intake (he drinks like a sponge) since it's late. We played with him gently (basically tried petting him while he's trying to bite us) and I was getting ready to walk him one last time before crating him for the night, when he crouched and started peeing on the floor. I screamed No! and he stopped peeing (he peed very little) and he ran away from me for a bit. Then I took him out, walked, and he peed very little again. What I'm trying to say is this wasn't an emergency peeing. He's perfectly healthy. He understands all kinds of commands. I am fairly convinced that he understands that he shouldn't pee at home. When he does, he pees and then runs away. When he does it outside, he always comes to me for praise.

DON'T TELL ME TO WALK HIM MORE THAN EVERY HOUR. Just generally, anyone who pretends here that they're some kind of a superman who takes their dog out every 15 min (when do they play and eat?), or who thinks that everything is always the owner's fault, can restrain from answering. We are doing everything humanly possible according to all the knowledge that we could gain from videos, trainers, the vet, on what to do with our dog. And this potty-training thing is not budging an inch. I would say it's getting worse (since he's now willing to go in his crate too, before it was just the floors).

I'm not saying it's his fault. He is who he is. Friends who see how much my life is suffering (emotional, professional, marital - etc.; we are two exhausted people, trying to figure out how to raise this dog well) suggested rehoming him to someone with a house or whatnot. We love this dog, we don't want to rehome him. I just simply don't understand how this dog can't - or doesn't want to - get housebroken. I love the beagle in him for many of his traits, but I am losing my patience over this. I feel despair. I'm reading now how this breed is difficult to housebreak and I remember thinking how I can achieve it with consistency, I just didn't think that my life would become hell.

I'm not even mentioning here that he bites, even growls (if he wants something), and that it's impossible to walk him without dangling pieces of bacon near the pocket and enticing him (otherwise he just drags himself, stops walking etc.). I love him, but I have to say that on days like this where I find myself weeping at his stubbornness, I miss the dogs that I had before... Please, don't post stuff that I know (all the crucial housebreaking info, or how I should be patient and consistent). I don't know what I'm asking for even. I just need to feel less exasperated.
 

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How old is he and how long have you had him?

Also, interrupting is appropriate when he goes indoors. But sounds like your interruptions are more like corrections since you describe he starts running away from you indoors. You need to establish a very good record of reward for going outside first. Not knowing the above information, it's hard to say... But it sort of sounds like he's just a very young puppy who is still trying to figure out what you want. He gets rewarded for going outside, which is great. But that doesn't mean he automatically eliminates all other possibilities (living room corner, living room carpet, under the chair in the living room, living room corner when you're not looking, living room carpet when you are watching, etc..). The point is, it is clear to US that outside is the only right answer, but dogs generalize so poorly that there is a chance that he is simply confused and still trying all the options. I would suggest removing corrections (like shouting NO!) because you run the risk of him learning to sneak his potty breaks indoors.

I don't know what else to tell you except it's ok... I know how frustrating it may seem that you are doing everything you can and making no progress on a seemingly simple thing. But, if it is any help at all... This is only as big a deal as you make of it. See mistakes as simply, mistakes. Let them go. Also, you and others may disagree with me and it strongly depends on the two questions I first posted, but if you've been at it for a WHILE, and he is old enough, maybe try another method. Potty pad train him then gradually move the pads outside. Would that be the worst solution in the world? Though to be honest, there is a chance that he really is just young and new to your routine and will get it eventually as long as you stick to it. It'll be okay.
 

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gosh if it was me with such a smarty pants.. I would baby gate him off into an area of tile flooring where I would put loads of papers down and not let it worry me so much or be put in a position to give the pup rewarding attention.. some times negative attention is just as rewarding to a pup to keep doing it to get the attention. Begals are extremely smart they pick things up really quickly even if it's in the wrong direction.. The movie Regarding Henry lol .. How can you set your environment up to put you more at ease, more relaxed that you can handle where your at right now.. For a pup who pee's they not going to have full privilege of the house hold, you can't keep them in the crate all the time, but they don't have to have the entire house either. That is where I would start, is isolate the behavior in a way you can be more relaxed for it happening, and stick to your schedule your trying to teach... Hang in there ...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Canyx and Patricia! Thank you so much for answering, I already feel better just having people heard me and answered me.

To answer questions, he's 5 and a half months old, we've had him for two and a half months. I know he's still a baby. BUT it's baffling to me that he can follow complex commands for 20 min that my spaniel wouldn't have ever picked up on, and be happy about it, because he's getting praise and treats. And that he would at the same time be so confused with the concept of where to potty? At the beginning I wasn't saying NO angrily when he peed at home, but I started doing it a month ago, because I start wondering whether the "just positive reinforcement" philosophy might be a fashion that can be proven wrong. (I don't mean that anyone should punish the dog, but I wonder if showing some form of discontent can help. I'm a researcher myself - though not in canine behavior - and I'm aware how much those things change all the time.) I certainly don't want him to be scared of me, or create a negative atmosphere. But I don't want him to think it's ok to bite humans, growl at us, because the vet says he'll be a big beagle (up to 50 pounds). I don't want to mess him up by being too tolerant and lenient. I don't want to mess him up by being too strict and punitive. (Do you think that the angry NO!! is damaging him, or our relationship? It's the last thing i want to do, but I just don't know how else to show him it's not ok to pee wherever, or bite or growl for that matter.)

This is how he seems to me: it seems to me that he knows what's right: he looks for his treat and praise after he pees outside. But then, why would he not go inside? He doesn't get a treat for not going inside (because it's impossible to treat that), so he goes inside when he feels like it, and he still gets to go outside and get a treat. He doesn't like me yelling no, but he doesn't seem too disturbed by it either. (He just runs away for a minute, and then can be easily taken out.)

Patricia, he does not have the full range of the house - I agree with you on that. He can only be in the spacious living room and kitchen areas (if he's not crated). I guess I'm not taking it too well that I went on around 500 walks (literally) with him and that nothing got better. I wonder: will it ever be? I also met a few beagle owners: one is housebroken, one is not (they never achieved it; I'm not saying it's not their fault, but they seemed to have tried.)

I think that I'm discouraged, tired, my marriage is taking a toll, my career too, I'm neglecting myself because I'm putting so much work into this (how else would he go out every hour or two and get his playtime, food etc.)? I just thought that things would start getting easier. I started this so emotionally stable, and now I feel like a wreck:((

Also, it didn't help that we used to live in an apartment that smelled like pee, and it was because the previous tenant had a yorkie who kept peeing on floors to the point that the building had to replace the floors, and then the smell still resurfaced because the pee seeped into the concrete below the flooring. (We didn't have a dog there.) But the fact that we lived with the smell of urine for a while probably doesn't help now, when our beagle seems to be so difficult to housebreak (because we were appalled that those people didn't train their yorkie; now I sometimes say, omg, maybe this was the life of those yorkie people and we judged them... )
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Also, I noticed that a lot of people say, just stick to it, be patient, it's gonna work out.

It's nice to hear. But, you know, we're all mammals. We're different than our doggies, of course, but I believe I also have the animal-bodily part of me: if I don't sleep, if I don't get rewarded by progress for my effort, if I'm exhausted - I start feeling really sad and angry and depressed. Sure, I have more control over it, but it's not boundless. And then it's just hard and I wonder when this is going to get better.

I love this little guy for his intelligence and stubbornness, and I'm also driven crazy by it.

PS. I think I will do the baby crate and put the papers down, Patricia. After all the books and videos, we thought it would be counterproductive, but if it's the only way for me to keep some sanity, I'll do it. But I usually just have to supervise him all the time anyway, so thats why we didn't do it. If I turn my head for a second, he eats everything: the carpet, the table legs, the wires, the moldings, I saw him chewing on the drywall... So I'm scared to have him by himself for even a minute. Either he's in a crate, or I'm playing with him, walking him, watching him. That's why I feel so overwhelmed.
 

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if it helps you can tape trash bags down first under the paper, or you can go to home depot, they have rubber runners you can purchase by the roll ( I used that for my puppy room) the rubber runner was expensive.. there was a roll of vynle with a foam backing.. very flexibly. easy to cut to shape.. We went with the light wood pattern.. it was cheaper and we did the entire house with it.. no matter what it's dog proof 15 years later it's still here .. so even for a small area it may help you feel better to have it on the floor for extra protection. I like beagles, they are exceptionally smart and puzzle solvers, have to be to out fox the fox right... might help to get a food puzzle toy give him some time to entertain himself and free up some time for you... You might look into Nose work games that you can do inside the house... Nose work is satisfying and tires them out... guess thinking about doing less activity, but finding really satisfying activities.. Hang in there.. !!!
 

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Well... he's a puppy. He's going to pee everywhere. All you can do is just limit the amount of freedom he has around the house, and keep doing what you're doing. Some dogs just take longer to housetrain... It took my dog like, a full year with me to get housetrained :/

I would also suggest using something higher in reward than just praise for housetraining. Every Beagle I've met has been a huge gourmand so maybe give him a very yummy treat for going outside each time :)
 

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Unfortunately, this all sounds like regular puppy behavior. Difficult to deal with, yes, but also totally normal. The general rule with puppies is 4 steps forward and 3 steps back. Sometimes it's 4 steps back. Sometimes it's 5.

I'm in the same boat as you. I have a 12.5 week old Great Dane puppy. My routine on a weekend, since I work full time, is as follows:

Wake up at 6:30 am - take puppy outside for pee
Breakfast at 6:35 am - puppy eats
Back outside at 6:45 am - puppy poops
Play time from 6:50-7:20 am - play with puppy
Training time from 7:20-7:35 - work on down/stay
Back outside at 7:35 - another pee break

That's where the regimented routine sort of falls apart. But I am outside with my puppy (who is probably larger than your Beagle and therefore has a larger bladder) every 40 minutes or so. 30 minutes if he's being super active. An hour if he's asleep or laying quietly chewing on something. Sometimes I miss it by a few minutes and the puppy goes in the house. Sometimes he signals at the back door. He seems to KNOW he should go outside, but sometimes can't help going inside because he has very minimal bladder control.

*IF* your puppy has regressed to the point where he's peeing inside in small quantities over short periods of time, perhaps have a vet run some tests to see if he has a UTI or bladder infection? It's probably NOT the cause, but just something to look out for if his bathroom habits change significantly.

I can't offer you any advice, really, just camaraderie. Puppies kind of suck. I can't remember the last time I got 8 hours of sleep (probably the night of 9/17, since I got him on 9/18), I don't see my friends, I can't read books or be on the computer or watch tv without checking where he is and what he's doing approximately every minute and a half. I guess my advice would be "try to let the accidents go, and it's not a crime to crate/contain your puppy while you're at home working". Working in an office is a blessing, because it actually gives my brain puppy-free time to recharge and I don't have to be on guard every second. Give yourself that time - you're not being cruel if you crate the puppy even when you're home, as long as you provide him with some food puzzle toys or something safe to chew on.

Good luck, and you're not alone :)
 

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I probably housetrain a little differently than most people. I just recently got an 8 week old puppy. I have a pen set up with newspaper down and she goes into it at night or during the day if I cannot watch her. She will be 10 weeks old this coming Monday and last night was the first night she has neither peed or pooped overnight. In another week, I will start to crate train her. During the day when she is sleeping or playing, as soon as she stops or wakes up, she goes outside. I sometimes get busy and she pees on the floor but I just clean it up and do not say anything to the puppy as it is my fault. I have not had a single poop in the house in the last week. I have housebroken all my pups this way and they are all reliably housebroken. I have never had a Beagle and I know some breeds are harder than others but I have housebroken them this way either using newspaper or a pellet box and had good luck with my small dogs. I did not get Kris, my Dobe, till she was 11 weeks old so she was crate trained right from the start.
 

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Honestly, it could be the smell of urine that's already in the house, but who knows...

I think it is typical for a 5.5 month old puppy to start holding it longer than an hour during the day and differentiating after over 2 months of work. But like others have said, every dog is different and some are just slow to housetrain. If I were in your shoes, I would put down potty pads in a tiled area and not be so hard on myself about letting him out every hour. I dislike potty pads but I would dislike being hypervigilant every waking hour, losing sleep, and setting my pup up to fail even more. I think dogs can develop a habit of where to go through repetition, and if it is indoors I would want to break the habit immediately. And if traditional housetraining methods (being vigilant, letting out every hour) wasn't working, I would set up a different scenario in which the dog would succeed.

Separate note, but you should never punish growling. Growling is simply how dogs communicate discomfort (or arousal, during play) and in itself is not aggressive. It's like if you were to tell someone, "Please back off." If you punish growling, you may stop the act but your dog might still harbor negative emotions.
Imagine someone you trusted and respected was for some reason trying to take your french fries while you were eating them and you say, "Hey, please stop that" (ie, growling). Well, that is as unacceptable so this person yells "NO!" suddenly at you, or maybe even slaps you across the head. Being the smart person that you are, you won't talk back anymore. But would that make you feel better about that situation? Your fries being taken? This person who you respected and trusted?
Basically, that's what's going on. And if you cut off a means of communication in your dog, you run the risk of 'forcing' your dog into true aggression instead, ie 'growling doesn't work so the dog immediately bites'.
Depending on why your dog is growling, there are positive ways of changing that. If it's resource guarding, there are plenty of resources out there but the gist of it is to offer something even better and teach the dog that your presence means awesome things, which would make your dog less wary of you and reduce growling.

Regarding your dog chewing up everything in sight, it may be worth setting up an ex-pen or a puppy area. I know it is exhausting to be watching the puppy and redirecting every second he is there, even when you're not interacting with him. So the compromise between hypervigilance and crate-only, is setting up an enclosure where he can still be near you but only has access to appropriate toys and chew items inside his pen.

All in all, yeah puppies suck :) Know that you are not alone and, for better or worse, what you are dealing with is absolutely normal. Sometimes, you need to get away from the 'by the books' thinking and just take a break. Think, "How can I make this easier for ME?" and often times there are solutions that are equally as good for the puppy. You can't train every waking second. Management is your friend. Set up situations in which you can take a mental break AND your pup can still succeed. It may mean more crate time some days, it may mean setting up an expen, it may mean tiling the floor with potty pads for a while... Whatever you choose, I hope it will give you peace of mind. You deserve it!
 

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This is why I don't do puppies.

Stop yelling at him for going inside. All that does is convince him not to pee in front you, which is going to make getting him to go outside in front of you all the harder. You may not think he cares about yelling, but I've yet to meet a truly hard tempered beagle. They're usually very sensitive dogs, just quiet about it. So ignore the mistakes and praise the successes.

Seconding Canyx about growling. If you punish growling, you can end up with a dog who bites "out of nowhere". You really don't want that.
 

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I agree with everything Hiraeth said. He sounds like a normal puppy. Frustrating, but normal.

I've gone through it twice in the past 3 years with my two dogs. Pepper wasn't fully house trained until about 10 months old. Kane took a bit longer even. His last accident was about a month ago and he's just over 1 year old. For both of them things did get significantly better around 6 months old, but they still had accidents if we weren't diligent about watching them.

Keep up what you're doing and he will catch on eventually.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks, everyone. I appreciate every word. Especially from those who have been through it or are going through it.

Today was the hardest day so far. After our walk and play at noon, I crated him and went to my home-office to work for an hour. He wasn't crying or anything, he likes the crate most of the time. After 10 min, I heard the most horrendous loudest horrible sounds - I would say imaginable, but I couldn't imagine anything so horrendous - coming from the living room. They were screams, but the pitch and the sound were otherworldly. It sounded as if 50 small very loud animals were being ripped apart alive. I don't even know how to describe this. I now tried to google howling, baying, but haven't found anything like this. I assume because the sound is so distressing that no one who's not a psychopath would be able to film it. Everyone who was in my building heard it.

I ran from the office, almost fell over the chair, thinking I'd find my puppy in a pool of blood or something. He had stuck his snout between the bars of the crate and screamed these hellish screams that curdled my blood. I managed to get his head out of there easily and quickly, but then i just tumbled to the floor and kept lying there, because I felt like I had no blood in my head nor body. The puppy was next to me, still in panic from being stuck for the first 5 min, then he just went around the apartment to sniff around. Then I started crying, my chest was in pain, I thought that I'd need the ER. I called my husband and he came from work, I kept crying uncontrollably for an hour. From the moment when he started screaming and the moment when I freed him from the crate (he could have pulled his head out, he just panicked and didn't know how) I'm sure that very little time passed, but it seemed to have slowed down in my head while I was running to the living room.

My husband said that he had once stepped on our dog's leash and the puppy was stopped while running, and he screamed for a while that time as well. Even the neighbors who have dogs all gathered to see why he's screaming so much because nothing really happened. (He entangled the leash a bit, and was pulled back by it.) So my husband was trying to tell me that I just have to accept that if the doggie is scared, he'll just emit these horrendous screams, and that I can't get a heart attack over it.

Today is the first day in 2 and a half months that I don't know if I can do this. Those screams curdled my blood. I don't think I can ever hear them without going into severe stress. I don't understand how this is happening to me: I was proud of keeping my pets until they died, and I am apparently incapable of dealing with this doggie. I repeat: I had two dogs, one lived to 12, one to 14 (and he was a large mixed rescue, which I rescued while he was in treatment for heart worms). I've never experienced anything like this. Barking: yes. But these screams... Maybe I'm too sensitive? I knew beagles were loud, and that he might howl and bark or bay, but... no one ever told me about these piercing screams. I cannot describe them. It doesn't sound like anything I've ever heard.

Today was the first day that my husband and I started reconsidering this situation, both for me and for the doggie. If I had been at work, I'm sure he would have gotten his head out of the crate, where he got stuck, and I wouldn't even know about this. (He wasn't hurt, and he wasn't so stuck, he just panicked.) Except that the neighbors would tell me (those that aren't at work). My husband's colleague wants to take him. She has a house and a yard and two other hounds, she lost a beagle from cancer. I don't know whether I can cope with this, and I don't know what would be better for my doggie. I can't imagine giving him to someone, but - am I in over my head??

I also realize from these posts that I probably put too much care and effort into doing everything right, and I think it's just adding stress. On the other hand, he really does get into trouble all the time everywhere: my husband had to save him from choking on the carpet threads that he managed to pull out and swallow in 10 seconds (since then we removed the carpet), we both had to get pebbles, wood, mulch out of his mouth. He even found two pieces of plastic at the Veterinarian Clinic (the best around), and the vet was apologizing, no one ever saw these pieces (he pulled them out of somewhere). (BTW, to reiterate for those who commented on the potty-training: he got a two hour check-up and he's perfectly fine. No UTIs nor anything.) He got a chew hound toy stuck on his head and I had to pull it off. I had to return a doggie bed because he was eating it. Now today, his head got stuck between the crate bars. I'm a nervous wreck. I thought of having a baby soon, and now I'm so emotionally distraught that I gave up on it for the moment. I don't know anything anymore.
 

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When he had his vet visit, did they run a urinalysis? 5-6 months old is a very common time for puppies to have a regression in house training, so you're certainly not alone. Many of us have been there. But a couple of times you specifically said that he peed very small amounts and that could be caused by an infection. If your vet ran a sample at the visit, then obviously ignore this.

My dog Squash was a real nightmare to house train. He could sleep overnight, but he is SO nosy and busy that he would get wrapped up in what he was doing and just not realize he had to pee until the very last second. He'd be playing or something and start to make a run for the back door, tinkling all the way. Or be walking across the room and just pause and pee with no signals whatsoever. I actually did have to resort to setting a kitchen timer for 10 minutes until I got a solid 1-2 days with no accidents under our belts and could gradually increase the time - at an age where he really "should" have been old enough to hold it for much longer than that. I could definitely see a nosy little beagle being the same way.

It was physically and emotionally exhausting but the good news is they grow up so it doesn't last forever. Even if you do everything right, some puppies are just real turds to house train.
 

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Everything you've described sounds normal for a puppy. If you feel that it's giving you a lot of anxiety and you aren't happy then you might want to rehome him. You said you can't cope with him, so maybe a puppy isn't the best thing for you right now. If you stick it out then it will get better, but that's up to you.
 

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Nadege, I feel for you, and have no great insight, just the wish to empathize/sympathize with you. I love dogs, and always will need one, but never thought i would have a 6month labradoodle puppy right now. You see i already put sll this hard work, into a head strong, but adorable labradoodle almost 9 years ago, when i got a puppy to help with my 7 year old going blind labradoodle. I had all the typical puppy traumas issues, and had to put the older one down at almost 14 2 years ago..all expected..and still had Chloe the cute labradoodle at age 7. Then close to 9th birthday the perfect dog..my love Chloe, dropped dead on aneurysm. So sad..lost my mind and my heart, so 5 days later, I got Bella a 6 month labradoodle. So calm, and sweet AT FIRST. But now I am on here scouring the forum for what to do with a 6 month old that once a day GETS WILD and JUMPY and BITES me...Argh..I am sure its 'normal'. Chloe didn't do it at this age as she had Bridget. Bridget didn't do it 14 years ago at this age. But Bella does...I love her, waiting for the moment when I fall in love with her...I miss Chloe...who was at that point of the nirvana dog. Now I am back on that track of working with a puppy. I keep thinking she is housetrained..but..every once in a while she reverts..on purpose. As she has a dog door. Just once in a while, she just chooses to pee...inside. So..they do that..I guess. I have started to take her to a dog park..i have to drive far, to go to a good one..as one close to me, isn't totally fenced in..BUT to get them exhausted is the key. Walks wont do it. I think walks just are good for training..to set rules. But to have a good tired puppy they need to RUN..and play..with other dogs. Oh, and as for the terrible wail of your dog..all i can say is he is a beagle and little beagles can make the most ungodly howl,bark, bray..whatever. Thatis just what they do. Keep us posted...I am not looking for the directions of how to keep sweet Bella from turning into the once a day Demon, where she bites and jumps on me. I put her in time out in the kitchen..and it works..but it is just unbelievable..how she wants to bite me..around 5pm... OK...keep posting and good luck! I think it does get better.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank you, everyone. Susan, thank you for posting this. I sometimes feel so alone in this hell of puppydom. I'm sorry to hear about Chloe. I was doing fairly ok with saying goodbye to my first two doggies. This is what helped me: knowing that, all in all, I gave them so much love and the best life that I could give them. They were happy dogs and I felt horribly sad for losing them when the time came, but I took solace in knowing that they had happy lives.

I empathize and sympathize as well. So much. Today has been a good day (so far) for us. He hasn't had any accidents, nor did he go into a fit of rage or craziness of any kind. Now I think there is no way I'd give him to someone. Yesterday I wondered (and I'm not saying I won't have days full of doubts again) because I am in an apartment, and I wonder sometimes whether I can fulfill my doggie's needs... You are so right about them playing with other dogs. Unfortunately, I don't have a dog park anywhere near, and my husband has the car pretty much all day, but that's why he took him to doggie daycare twice. First day we thought it was a solution to many problems: I got to rest and the puppy came back tired and calm. The second day he went, he came back with a horrible bite on his face. I cried the entire evening. They didn't have puppies, they took 35 bucks from us, and they put him to play with big dogs: a 45-pound dog bit him. He came back frightened and not tired at all, as this happened in the morning and then they secluded him with humans or not, instead of just calling us. We even have a package with them, but I can't send him there again. And they have the best reviews in the city.

My beagle also gets into fits of craziness, they are just not predictable at all. He runs around as if he had been hooked into an electric outlet and bites both of us. If we're walking, he's attacking pants, socks... he'll bite our faces or hands if he can reach them. I've been saying NO adamantly to that (I don't care that people say only positive reinforcement works), I just can't let him get used to biting people, and then give him time-outs (if I manage to, sometimes when he has these fits, I can't even get a hold of him, he's so wiggly and nuts). I have started seeing the signs of him actually reacting to my firm NO. Yesterday evening, he wanted to go chew the cable wires, and I said NO, and he actually looked at me and stopped. I felt like we were getting somewhere...

Keep posting here on your progress or share any insights. I'm at my wits end some days. Today has been better and I already feel like my former self. I dread the moment he goes into the crazy mode again...
 

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I am sorry the doggy daycare didn't work out..That reminded me of how it was my sanity saver back in the days of Bridget and Chloe's puppiness, and my full time job, away from home. I loved to take them (there was a 7 year difference, so when Bridget was a puppy, there was no Chloe, and when Chloe a puppy, Bridget was a 7 year old 'lady'..she and I both loved the days Chloe went to DoggyDaycare). They would segregate the puppies, so that puppies were only with puppies. I was lucky, as it worked out nicely...3 times a week! Right now, Bella can't go until she is spayed, and she will be spayed this coming week. Yay...looking forward to that. Only a dog can tire out a puppy.. Maybe there is another one in your area that is safer? I know how your emotions fluctuate from one moment to the next. At 5pm today, whenshe was DEVIL DOG, I didn't like her much. But the rest of the day, she was sweet calm Bella. (who had a friggin accident, which was more of an 'on purpose..). And now, asleep on her back, on the sofa..she is sweet girl again. I think it is odd of all of us humans, that we expect a puppy (or dog) to understand our words and commands...and do good things...whereas what would we expect of a 1 year old child? So...I KNOW each week will get better...maybe not each day, and definitely not each moment. But all of a sudden you'll realize, Hey, my dog is my GOOD companion and I love him!!
 

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We have a beagle and I will NEVER get another one. OMG i wish someone had warned me. I love him but NEVER again!!!! So i feel you! They are very stubborn!
 
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