Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings All,

My first post here. Not new to dogs. Wife and I have fostered over 55 dogs and puppies in the last few years, though none lately.

Here's the situation...
"D" is a six year old neutered male Chihuahua that lost his human in late December. We are his designated guardians. I promised his "mom" that I would see to his care, either with us or a suitable new home.

Here's the big problem.
D's mom thought it was cute when he snarled at her or her spouse, so for the first six years or so of the little dog's life snarling at humans was perfectly okay.

We have made much progress on this front, but he still snarls at me or my wife from time to time. I am not okay with this behavior. When he snarls I admonish him with a "bad dog"

Also, one thing I like all of "my dogs", fosters included is to be able to roll them on their back and have them be calm/okay with it. D has not made much progress on this front with either my wife or me.

So, please, give it your best shot.

Thanks,
Uncle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,350 Posts
What does he snarl at you for? What are the circumstances/situations when he snarls?

As for rolling them on their backs: I can see why you might want them to be ok with it, if, for instance, they need to get used to handling, for the vet, groomer, etc. Usually dogs might volunteer to flop over on their backs. Mine do it for back rubs, and also if they take something they're not supposed to have and I give them "the look". But, as far as actually pushing or rolling them over, that might worry me, especially if they're fosters and you might not know much about their background.

When a dog physically puts another on their back it's usually not good at all. They sometimes will voluntarily flop down, as I said, to show submission, but to be physically put on their back can be seen by the dog as bullying and it can cause them to get defensive. So, I don't know how to help you with that one. Maybe someone else will chime in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
Just curious, is this snarling a pre-snap or bite program or just something he does and all else is normal.

Our new in home dog warbles (I got no other word to explain it) when wife gets home he runs to door sits and does the warble thing then runs over to me on recliner warbling as he approaches me, I say yeah mom's home and back he goes to her. This is a ritual that we have started cause we like it and as he's doing it his butt/tail is doing the wobble/wag thing so we assume he like's it.

The snarl thing if they liked/enjoyed it on both ends could be something he's looking for after the disaster of losing home. I don't have a clue if my read is right, just throwing it out here.

As far as roll on back the dog need's trust in new program he's going through right now. Does he sit or down for you. If he does not then the roll on back may or may not be in future.

Late Dec to late March not much time for some 6 yr old's to adjust to a brand new life. Just Sayin'...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
Don't try to force him onto his back. It's a vulnerable position, and dogs should be the ones to offer it, not a person forcing it. Soft patting, rubbing and grooming will often encourage dogs to roll over. I have a dog that was almost feral, and it took about a year to get him comfortable enough to roll over to get his belly scratched. When grooming, he was nervous, so I would brush his belly from a sitting position, and lift a front leg.
Try teaching a down command, using a hand patting the ground in front of him. Once he is laying down, stroke his sides, and down his back legs to encourage him to relax, and roll over voluntarily. Then add a verbal cue, when he rolls over.

If snarling is his way of talking, then I wouldn't worry. If he is objecting to something, I'd stop doing whatever it is, and try to figure out a positive way to get the behavior you need. (IE, if he is up on a couch and you need him moved, get a treat, and call him, and give the treat as a reward, rather than trying to pick him up and move him. Or keep a leash on him when supervised, and pick up the end, and call him off, and give him a treat.)
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top