Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


I have a 8 week old Lab mix the breed is a guess because she is a shelter pup I also have a 3 year old daughter and now that my puppy is getting familiar with all of us she does play rough with my daughter today she drew blood! I am a little out of my element here as to how to curb this behaviour. Please can someone tell me what I can do to make her be calmer with my daughter? She acts like my daughter is her litter mate she does nt do this to myself or my husband. Any help will be appreciated. I just want both parties to enjoy each other without hurting or being hurt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

1. Change your title to reflect the problem. Many people (including me, usually) will overlook a thread titled "I need help". Maybe "Puppy Hurts Toddler" or "Puppy and Child Help Needed.

2. Keep them from playing together until you get it worked out to prevent further injuries. Don't leave them together unattended.

3. Does the puppy get plenty of play and exercise with you? An 8-week old puppy should pretty much sleep, potty and play for 10 minutes at a time.

4. Does the puppy have a crate? If not, get one, train him to it and use it.

5. Make sure the puppy has plenty of chew toys and other toys to keep him busy. A puppy Kong stuffed with his meals is a good way to keep him entertained.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,574 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

I agree with FourIsCompany and would just like to add, instead of trying to deter bad behaviors ask for positive behaviors. If puppy is jumping on daughter hold a very tasty treat by the end of puppies nose and redirect her attention to you. Lead her into a sit with the treat by holding the treat up just above puppies nose. When puppy sits immediately give the treat. Praise like crazy for good behavior.

Puppy will have a lot of energy and will need to burn that off as well. Does puppy like to chase toys? Do you have a fenced in yard that you can safely contain puppy and allow her to run? You should be interacting with puppy during that time.
Also, get puppy into a socialization/ puppy kindergarten class ASAP. This period in a puppies life is short but can drive a person crazy. This is why I more often then not recommend getting an adult dog to people with small children. You can do it, just hang in there. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Re: I NEED help!!!

Hi Thanks a lot for your reply. First I must compliment you on your absoulely BEAUTIFUL dogs! They are stunning! Thanks a lot for your input I will change the title. I am new to posting threads and it is taking a little bit of getting used to.

Now for some background. I have had other puppies before in fact 5 in my lifetime but Zoe is my first since I had my daughter. I also have a 6 year old chow-chow . He tolerates the puppy but does not harm her.

I have Zoe on a routine now from potty training her outside crate training her and playtime. She plays with my husband and I like you said max about 10 minutes then we take her out to potty and she takes her cat nap.

It is the times she plays with my toddler who loves her but she cannot follow instructions very well. I have asked her not to move to stand still no eye contact and turn away when Zoe does something she shouldnt do....but Lana is a typical toddler she cannot resist squealing and running in this case she jerked her arm back when Zoe had it clamped in her teeth.

I am hoping I can nip this behaviour in the bud. I did not anticpate this as an issue because in prior instances with my other dogs I simply sai a firm no and handed them a toy to redirect but there is something about a small active loud child which is more appealing than a soft squeaky toy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,851 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

Young Labs and Lab Xs are typically pretty wild and free with their mouths. It likely gets worse before it gets consistently better. My Golden pup saw my son as a giant chew toy. What works is to allow interactions with the dog ONLY when you are there to DIRECTLY supervise. It also helps to allow them to play together only after you've run the puppy's little legs off. Pick play times when the puppy is naturally at her calmest (a tired puppy is a good puppy) so the puppy can understand the contrast between good and bad play. Eliciting good behaviors (vs. correcting bad behaviors) is more successful when the pup is not full of pent up energy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Re: I NEED help!!!

Thnaks you very much Marsh Muppet! I think I will use the method you suggest. They only get to play with each other when I am around...in fact I am always around because my goal is to get Zoe toilet trained and to avoid accidents and destruction of furniture shoes etc:) I am having to follow her around but she sleeps most of the day on and off wakes up we go outside together play indoors ( the walking isnt really so practical right now she cant walk long sidtances and will sit down so we cant include her in our twice daily walking routine we have for my older dog. But we do play with her and allow her to social under supervison with lour neighbourhood dogs like we have the older one. The biting is the only thing I am out of my element with since it isnt something I have dealt with before. Thank God pouupies and dogs live in the moment Zoe was quickly over it my toddler on the other hand....:)

Inga, What a beautiful dog you have! I appreciate your advice it is very useful and practical. We have a large fenced in back yard but at this time I dont allow her off her trainign leash because I monitor her pee and poo and also we have fruit and flower trees and dont want her to eat any of it and get sick.

I agree with you as well on having an older dog in a home with small children. Zoe came to us under extreme circumstances from a kill shelter but I am a stay at home Mom and am confident with the right guidance I can overcome this obstacle. I just need to learn how to intervene and handle it with a positive result on both parties child and puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

I agree with FourIsCompany and would just like to add, instead of trying to deter bad behaviors ask for positive behaviors. If puppy is jumping on daughter hold a very tasty treat by the end of puppies nose and redirect her attention to you. Lead her into a sit with the treat by holding the treat up just above puppies nose. When puppy sits immediately give the treat. Praise like crazy for good behavior.

Puppy will have a lot of energy and will need to burn that off as well. Does puppy like to chase toys? Do you have a fenced in yard that you can safely contain puppy and allow her to run? You should be interacting with puppy during that time.
Also, get puppy into a socialization/ puppy kindergarten class ASAP. This period in a puppies life is short but can drive a person crazy. This is why I more often then not recommend getting an adult dog to people with small children. You can do it, just hang in there. :)
Inga
We had different approach, we always put pups and kids in room and whichever one came out 1st we kept. Is that bad?:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Re: I NEED help!!!

WVasko,

LOLS! Thanks for the humour! I think in my case it will be the puppy! I have got my Lana (my daughter) to stand still with folded arms and stare up at the ceiling when Zoe ( the puppy) gets too rough it is a deterrent as long as she does it. They are never left unsupervised and yes we do have a large backyard but she is only allowed out on a leash with me because I am still potty trainig her and also I have fruit trees and flower bushes she can hutr herself in and maybe even eat something she shouldnt. I take my other dog on walks when Zoe is old enough I will do the same with her.
Thanks a lot for your input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,399 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

I don't think the forum allows users to edit their thread titles (no clue why), but I changed the title so the thread gets more hits. Carry on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,574 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

Inga
We had different approach, we always put pups and kids in room and whichever one came out 1st we kept. Is that bad?:D
SASSY! I guess as long as you paired up the size of puppy with the aggressiveness of the child it would be fair. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Re: I NEED help!!!

I don't think the forum allows users to edit their thread titles (no clue why), but I changed the title so the thread gets more hits. Carry on!
Thank you sooo much! I tried to edit the title but noticed what you mentioned above. Thanks a lots for the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,307 Posts
Re: I NEED help!!!

SASSY! I guess as long as you paired up the size of puppy with the aggressiveness of the child it would be fair. ;)
Are you kidding if pups were well bred we put 5 or 6 pups with 1 kid, we weren't going to take chances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Im having almost the same problem, and also came here for help.
I have a sheppard/husky mix, hes now 5 months old. he loves to play I play with him walk him ect.. once in a while while petting him hell turn to nip at me (playfully) I tell him no and he stops if he doesnt I Ignore him intill he stops. however he chases my daughter 8 years old and son 6 years old, my daughter is large enouph to grap his collar and tell him no. My son on the other hand isnt. The dog pretty much chases him hes playing but sometimes he gets to rough. He doesnt seem to really stop unless I get his attention if I say no he more or less doesnt hear me. If I get up get his attention and say no he stops. They are always supervised, however puppy teeth are sharp and my son has scratches on his arms from the dog. I got a phone call from the school nurse today because of this. Im not sure what to do help train him not to do this fast enouph. he loves the whole family and gets soo excited when anyone comes home. however he shows his affection through nibbling, and light bitting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Im having almost the same problem, and also came here for help.
I have a sheppard/husky mix, hes now 5 months old. he loves to play I play with him walk him ect.. once in a while while petting him hell turn to nip at me (playfully) I tell him no and he stops if he doesnt I Ignore him intill he stops. however he chases my daughter 8 years old and son 6 years old, my daughter is large enouph to grap his collar and tell him no. My son on the other hand isnt. The dog pretty much chases him hes playing but sometimes he gets to rough. He doesnt seem to really stop unless I get his attention if I say no he more or less doesnt hear me. If I get up get his attention and say no he stops. They are always supervised, however puppy teeth are sharp and my son has scratches on his arms from the dog. I got a phone call from the school nurse today because of this. Im not sure what to do help train him not to do this fast enouph. he loves the whole family and gets soo excited when anyone comes home. however he shows his affection through nibbling, and light bitting.
jhull,

I know what you mean. It is not the lack of excercise with my puppy either she gets plenty with me and my husband she is a lab?husky mix and 10 weeks old she cant climb on the couch so my daughter (3 years old) escapes to it but that will soon come to an end as tall as she is getting. I tell her to stop playing with the pup when she nips and stand very still fold her hands and look at a point in the ceiling....if she follows those instructions the pup stops and looses interest. She plays with my 3 year old like she would her littermate and the squealing and running my daughter does doesnt help either.

So far the pup hasnt done any serious damage I have taught my daughter to distract her with a chew toy and it works.
I always supervise them together when they play and it is always after the pup is tired out from a walk or playing with me. It is a phase try asking your son to stand still and make no eye contact and fold hands so the puppy understand rough play isnt ok. The thing with saying no with my pup is she hears that about chewing on the rug or coming into the bathroom ...she hears it a lot so to really get the point across just stop everything and she gets that she cant be rough. It has worked so far. Except in cases where food is involved !
Good luck we are both going through the same thing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
yeah he was small when we got him, and the kids did run for the couch but hes growing like a weed, and the couch no longer stops him. Hes not attacking them, hes wagging his tail having a good time. I seen him serious one time before his hair stand up tail doesnt wag, ect... This wasnt with the kids. With the kids its deffiently play but his teeth are sharp and when he really gets going (excited) my son (6years) cant seem to get him to stop.
We love him Im really attached to him. hes such a great dog, just gotta get a handle on him with the kids. when he was smaller it was much easier now hes getting bigger where he can jump, run ect...
Sometimes I believe hes testing me. Once in a while he will start bitting one of the kids and when I tell him no. He stares at me barks, after 10 sec. of this he turns to one of the kids to bite them again ill say no he will stop stare at me barking again, If I approach him he will get away from the kids and stop. but intill I approach him its like a game he watches me while barking to see my reaction. maybe its nothing but I always think to myself at those times that hes testing me. Its so fustrating because Im trying to teach him quickly before this becomes habit or someone really gets hurt, but when the school nurse calls home due to marks its just not fast enouph. Kinda hoping there could be a solid answer to how to break this.
He is very smart was house trained in 4 days without the use of a cage, he only had 3 maybe 4 accidents in this time he was 9 weeks old when we got him and had no training before hand. He knows what good and bad mean, and reacts to them, but this seems to be a little harder then that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
yeah he was small when we got him, and the kids did run for the couch but hes growing like a weed, and the couch no longer stops him. Hes not attacking them, hes wagging his tail having a good time. I seen him serious one time before his hair stand up tail doesnt wag, ect... This wasnt with the kids. With the kids its deffiently play but his teeth are sharp and when he really gets going (excited) my son (6years) cant seem to get him to stop.
We love him Im really attached to him. hes such a great dog, just gotta get a handle on him with the kids. when he was smaller it was much easier now hes getting bigger where he can jump, run ect...
Sometimes I believe hes testing me. Once in a while he will start bitting one of the kids and when I tell him no. He stares at me barks, after 10 sec. of this he turns to one of the kids to bite them again ill say no he will stop stare at me barking again, If I approach him he will get away from the kids and stop. but intill I approach him its like a game he watches me while barking to see my reaction. maybe its nothing but I always think to myself at those times that hes testing me. Its so fustrating because Im trying to teach him quickly before this becomes habit or someone really gets hurt, but when the school nurse calls home due to marks its just not fast enouph. Kinda hoping there could be a solid answer to how to break this.
He is very smart was house trained in 4 days without the use of a cage, he only had 3 maybe 4 accidents in this time he was 9 weeks old when we got him and had no training before hand. He knows what good and bad mean, and reacts to them, but this seems to be a little harder then that.
I know exactly what you mean! Trust me when I posted this question I was looking for a solid answer too but unfortunately there arent any I think. He is testing you and mine does the SAME EXACT thing! Brak when I correct her. It is a game! But correct him once after approaching the space. Claim the space between your son and him and then firmly say no ONCE. If we repeat the command they learn that they get attention that way and they will do it again for that reason and then it becomes a game.

I can understand your frustration with the school nurse calling you about the marks. But you know I have a very physical 3 year old and she is always running jumping and bruising.....even if it isnt the dog I am sure our kids are going to be bruised. Hopefully the call was routine and if it continues a face to face meeting with you will asuage the nurse's fears that this is some sort of abuse. Believe me I can imagine how you feel about this situation. I can empathize with you completely. I know I would feel awkward having to explain I have no control over the puppy but really aside from supervising play and making sure no harm comes to either what more can we do? In my case my daughter wants to play despite the roughness sometimes so it goes both ways. Many rescues and breeders have strict rules in adopting out puppies to the homes where kids are 10 and under for this very reason. Although I understand that point of view....growing up with a puppy or dog is an intregal part of a child's developement. I think it teaches them responsibility and empathy. So the concept is a double edged sword. We thought long and hard about the choice to bring home a pup and we take heart in that this is only a stage. And it is normal.

it sounds like our puppies are very similar in nature! Mine does the same thing - is defiant, fiesty, very agile and playful. I wouldnt want her to be any other way at this stage. We can only do our best and hope for the best. This is clearly not a behavioural problem just growing pains! For both the kids and the puppies...and just a pain' for us parents! :)
Dont loose heart this phase will pass for both of us!
Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
suzette:

I would suggest you read up on bite inhibition training. It takes a bit of time, but it's well worth the effort and it's a long-term answer to a potential long-term problem. In the mean time, as others have suggested, make sure any play sessions are very carefully supervised and be prepared to correct the puppy if she gets too rough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
suzette:

I would suggest you read up on bite inhibition training. It takes a bit of time, but it's well worth the effort and it's a long-term answer to a potential long-term problem. In the mean time, as others have suggested, make sure any play sessions are very carefully supervised and be prepared to correct the puppy if she gets too rough.
Thanks Lacey,

I was thinking the same! I know she is a pup and I have had other pups chew n bite play before and have all invariably grown out of it but this is my first pup after the child so I dont want to take anhy chances with it.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top