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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm thinking if I get a dog, It will definitely be at least one or two years old, out
of the puppy phase, to try and keep them a little more mature.

Can you guys point me in the direction of a good breed that
is generally independent and will handle being alone for
5-6 hours? (school and work)

I have an exercise pen and crate,
I also have a spacious back yard with 5 feet fence etc.
But my door does not lead to the back yard,
it leads to a balcony, no doggy door.

My problem is that I do not know if a young but not fully adult dog be
able to stay satisfied in conditions where it is left alone for
5-6 hours 5 days a week, with no access to the back yard.

I will walk it before hand to have it relaxed enough for the time,
but is this still to hard on these dogs?

My options are

1. Leaving the dog in the crate for 6 hours.

Most people I consult with say this will hurt them mentally and physically in the long run on a regular basis.

2. Another option is to let it walk around in a generously sized exercise pen for its
6 hours, with sufficient toys and news papers if needing to relieve itself.

Again some breeders I talked with think leaving them in a pen like this will
stimulate them physically, but not mentally.

3. Finally, I live in a two floor house I own,
but am not able to install a doggy door.
Would a dog be able to "hold it" while I'm gone,
with free roam of the house, or would they need to relieve themselves on newspapers?

For this some more breeders believe dogs should never relieve themselves on newspapers or doggy pads.

I am a first time owner, which means I've never had the responsibility
for caring one on my own before. I will dedicate myself 100% out of
those lonely 5-6 hours,

(I plan on adopting from a shelter or rescue,
only a slight possibility with a breeder.)

My friend who is part of a border collie rescue group says I have no where near enough experience to handle one of those, but he thinks a sporting dog would suit my active lifestyle well.
(I have been looking into German short haired pointers, would they be satisfied in
these conditions?
Even if they are would I, a new owner, be able to handle them with just dedication, book smarts and some obedience classes?

I'm doing a lot of research before I pull the trigger so I know what I'm getting into.
I believe if I want to care for one of these animals, I got to do it right or not do it at all.

Hopefully this thread can kick start me into a long and
happy life with a possible new companion.

Sorry for this lengthy post, just want to cover all bases
 

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5-6 hours in NOTHING! I don't know who you are talking to, but they must not live in reality. In a normal house hold, most people have full time jobs, and can be gone for over 9 hours, and the whole time the dog is in a crate/indoors.

To help you, I have a few questions so I can narrow down breeds.

How much grooming are you willing to do/have done?
Is a sheding breed ok?
How much time do you plan on spending being active with your dog (walks, play time, going to the park, agility...)
What size/weight?
Are you interested in any kind of dog sport?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your insight, this seems to be a controversial topic on crate times.

I originally wanted a whippet, but the breeder I talked to say they thrive on companion ship, and 6 hours would not
promote healthy growth, so that option is out for the time being.

How much grooming are you willing to do/have done?
Once a week preferable, with not much professional needed.

Is a sheding breed ok?
They are fine, I plan on shaving them regularly with a furminator, seems like a decent product.

How much time do you plan on spending being active with your dog (walks, play time, going to the park, agility...)
1-2 hours every week day, with plenty more on weekends

What size/weight?
Around 30-80lbs would be preferable, small to medium ish.

Are you interested in any kind of dog sport?
I do not think I have the time to properly dedicate a dog to
something like agility.

Again most breed selector quiz pointed me in the direction of a German Shorthaired pointers direction,
but would someone like me with no experience but patience, dedication, and some outside help make it work?

Either way please point me in the direction of some other compatible breeds.

Thanks again
 

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Thank you for your insight, this seems to be a controversial topic on crate times.

I originally wanted a whippet, but the breeder I talked to say they thrive on companion ship, and 6 hours would not
promote healthy growth, so that option is out for the time being.

How much grooming are you willing to do/have done?
Once a week preferable, with not much professional needed.

Is a sheding breed ok?
They are fine, I plan on shaving them regularly with a furminator, seems like a decent product.

How much time do you plan on spending being active with your dog (walks, play time, going to the park, agility...)
1-2 hours every week day, with plenty more on weekends

What size/weight?
Around 30-80lbs would be preferable, small to medium ish.

Are you interested in any kind of dog sport?
I do not think I have the time to properly dedicate a dog to
something like agility.

Again most breed selector quiz pointed me in the direction of a German Shorthaired pointers direction,
but would someone like me with no experience but patience, dedication, and some outside help make it work?

Either way please point me in the direction of some other compatible breeds.

Thanks again
You can make anything work, especially with a potty trained adult. A pup would be a bit more difficult... We can be gone 7 to 8 hours a day and in that time the dogs sleep. We make sure we play with them, walk them and to to the dog park. They aren't suffering and I love them dearly. Don't worry about what people say, you are already doing the right thing by coming to this forum. I suggest yuo decide temparement you are looking for.. But I would think an adult lab would be right for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hearing this from experienced dog owners gives me confidence I can make this work, so I thank you for that.

I've read countless pages on how to train dogs love their crates, etc.
I'm planning on getting a German pointer or lab, generally medium to larger dogs.

Would they be suitable to be crated for life,
Or will I need to gradually allow them free roam of the house.

Letting them roam free in a spacious home for 6 hours leaves many variables for a bored dog,
so what I'm asking is leaving a proven, well mannered crate trained dog
live comfortably knowing 5 days out of the week they are chewing on a Kong or something for six hours,
until I get home.
 

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If the dog is trustworthy and you've dog-proofed (even with a trusted dog, why tempt fate, imo) I see no issue. 5-6 hours is shorter than the typical work day, as others have pointed out. Whether or not you crate your dog while away or allow them freedom is a matter of personal preference. Crating is the "safer" option just because your dog can't get out and get into trouble. Yoou seem responsible, so I see little issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for all your help,
I'm rescuing a 3 year old purebred husky later this week.
(Very mild mannered and housebroken)
 

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Huskies need a LOT of exercise of exercise and stimulation. I don't know if that would be a good idea for a first time dog owner.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've spoken extensively with the foster home, and she to was hesitant about letting a first time owner care for a husky.
The husky is overweight, as a result of absolutely no stimulation or exercise for 3 years. (previous home)

Right now even though I have no experience she thinks because of my active lifestyle being out 2 hours on the fields sprinting,
coupled with obedience classes would work well

I 100% understand they are not a beginner dog,
but most people think it would work.

Then again it couldn't hurt to look things over.
 

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Huskies aren't really first time dogs. And they need loads of exercise. And they tend to be escape artists.

Plus, dogs tend to act a bit differently in foster care and for the first few weeks to months in a new home. Just be prepared that once she settles in and loses weight, she might be not so mild mannered as advertised.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It`s not such a sure thing for the husky right now,
but a retired greyhound is much easier to manage,
so those are my top two.

I know greyhounds look like a much better choice in my situation,
but I`m just going to see how this all plays out.
 

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Regarding crating:
5-6 hours is fine for anything older than a young puppy. I crate my border collie x GSP mix for 8hrs/day and she's fine. BUT we make our time together count with agility, disc, nosework, hiking, swimming, walking, etc. First time dog owners (like myself) can handle these high-energy not-for-a-first-time-owner breeds WITH DEDICATION.

Regarding finding the right dog for you:
Over the past 3 days, you've written about acquiring a GSP, a husky, and a greyhound. I guess my advice is to go slowly. Really research any breed you're interested in. Meet as many individuals of that breed as you can. Talk to their owners. Ask if you can dogsit for them while they're out of town. In other words, know what you're getting into. Finding the right dog for you can (and probably should) take weeks to months, or maybe even a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I agree with the whole switching it up, almost everyday.
It's just the whole notion of of getting a dog is very exciting.
(Including all the responsibilities of course)

I've got my primary ideas now, so
I'll take it easy from now till the time comes.

Thanks for everyone's help,
I think I've got a good idea what to expect,
and will frequent this forum after I adopt one.
 

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I can point out a few similarities between the Greyhound and the Siberian Husky:

They both have a considerable prey drive
They both can run very quickly
They both should not be trusted off leash.

From what I understand, Greyhound are a little more apt to lay around than Sibes, and I'm not sure about Greyhounds but someone mentioned about huskies being escape artists. Please, do not take this lightly. Mine can nearly jump over a 6 foot fence. She climbs it easily, WITH a structure over it. They can climb, dig, chew through fencing and destroy the dry wall. The times I've taken her to a park where she can run freely, she spent the entire time looking for holes in the fence and gates. When she found the gates, she tried to flip the latches up. They are problem solvers and it's difficult to fool them twice. Plus, they shed. Hardcore. This is an everyday thing and I have just one husky with a shorter, thinner coat. I have to vacuum 3 times a day to keep up with it.
My sibe, however, can get by on 1 hour a day of exercise, if it came to that, but most need at least 2 and some of that should involve running.
But they truly are a great breed if you can handle them.
 

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I've never owned one but from what I've read a greyhound sounds like it would suit you better than a husky. I think greyhounds are generally more easy-going than huskies, they can be really active but have a better "off switch". I don't think either should be let off-leash as HollowHeaven says, so consider carefully if thats important to you. If it is you could try another breed or mix with better recall.

Like I said, I've never owned either, I'm just going off some doggy acquaintances and reading I've done.
 

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I like to recommend an adult Lab rescue to new owners. Maybe a 3 - 5 year old dog. Many times the rescue can fit the dog to the owner.
But a mature adult still has energy, if you condition it; won't need to be shaved; can sleep during the day; and will forgive you for first-time owner mistakes. They can adapt to most situations and are easy to train. As a bonus, if you have some help and access to a large fenced, you can run with them off-leash. (Sporting dogs were breed to work with hunters offleash.)
 
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