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hello,
i am looking for a dog and not so sure on what kind i should get. i know someone that has a Australian shepherd/lab/catahoula mixed puppy that they are willing to give me. But as what ive researched about the australian shepherd along with the lab that they maybe highly intelligent and easy to train but both have a down fall and that is they are heavy shedder's!! unless what i've researched is wrong im thinking about getting a different kind, it can be mixed or a pure breed dog but what Im wanting is a dog thats intelligent, easy to train and that doesn't shed as much because i really dont want dog hair all over my home. so if anyone can help me out please i will appreciate it.
Thank you!
 

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Welcome!

If you don't want a well bred purebred dog, look on petfinder for rescues and mixes - don't purchase a mixed pup from a 'breeder'. Smart dogs aren't always the easiest to train because they do think, and labs and aussies are very different as far as thinking and training goes, depending on the lines and such.

If you don't want dog hair, then get a non shedding breed, but know you'll have to do more work to keep up the coat and spend more at the groomer. My guys both shed but they're not bad for being brushed out which keeps it down and I'm ok with living with hair, we have lint brushes and just need to get rid of the rest of the carpet in the house... We have a persian cat now and he's the most work to groom, requires weekly bathing and daily attention....

Lana
 

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I used to have a Collie. I brushed and combed him at least once a week, and took him to the groomer every month. The key thing is to make sure there are no mats. I vacuumed the carpets 2-3 times a week and swept the floors every day. Most of his shedding fur came out when I brushed him.

Now I have a Wheaten terrier. I brush and comb him every other day (10-15 minutes), and take him to the groomer every 2 months. He's only been to the groomer once, at this point. He does not shed. His coat tangles very easily and forms tiny little mats which would grow into a big problem if I didn't take proper care of his coat.

However, he does make a mess. Everything sticks to his coat. I still have to vacuum and sweep just as often because of the leaves, twigs, and grass clippings he brings into the house. If he gets muddy (loves water and dirt), the mud makes his coat look like it has tiny dreadlocks all over it. I have to bathe him then, and I have to change the water he is standing in at least 4 times.

Burs and tiny sticky seed pods stick to his coat. One time there were over 100 little green seed pods dispersed throughout it after a walk in the woods. Every time we go out during the season for these things, I spend a lot of time getting this stuff out of his hair.

When he gets wet (rain, snow, water), he gets soaked to the skin. When I towel him dry, he is still wet, just not dripping a lake of water all over the floor. He has to either be blown dry or wear a waterproof coat outside in cold weather. In the summer, he air dries because it is hot here.

The entire time I had my Collie, mud dried and fell off his coat, and nothing got stuck in it. Rain and melted snow never penetrated the top of his coat. I could towel him dry, and he'd be fine in a jiffy. He did not like pools of water like Aidan does, though, so he was only submerged in it when he had a bath at the groomer's. His coat was actually easier and less time-consuming to care for than my Wheaten's coat is.

I don't know if an Aussie has a coat similar to a Collie's. If they do, I think it would be easier to care for. I figure I'd sweep just as often, and probably have to vacuum once or twice a week anyway. The vacuuming is not a big deal -- I'm talking about the living room and dining room (bedrooms get vacuumed once a week, sometimes less often). If I don't take burs and mud into consideration, I spend the same amount of time each week combing Aidan as I did brushing my collie.
 

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Poodle mixes, Bichon mixes don't shed much, but require grooming. They are also intelligent and easy to train. I consider a Bichon to be like an economy-sized Lab :)
 

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OP, you told us that you want a dog that is intelligent, easy to train, and non/low-shedding, but we might need a little more information from you before we can make a recommendation...

What is your previous experience (first time dog owner?, owned dogs all your life?)
How much time and energy are you willing to devote to exercising the dog?
Is there anything specific that you'd like to do with your dog? Hiking? Hunting? A dog sport?
How much time/energy are you willing to spend grooming? Or will you have this done professionally?
To what level do you want to train the dog? Are you willing to attend training classes?
What size dog are you looking for? Weight range would be helpful.
 

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I have to ditto GottaLuvMutts. :) My question was going to be less thorough, but REALLY really consider the energy level which best fits your need. If your super active, an active dog will be great, if your a couch potato, you'll want a dog with little exercise needs. I know not everyone is a fan of Cesar Milan, but he has an EXCELLENT chapter on that in one of his books, "A Member of the Family" which I checked out from the local library.

Before you get your puppy by Ian Dunbar also has good info on choosing a puppy. But, Cesar Milan's section about matching energy types and assessing a dog's psychological health/personality was really great.

BEFORE YOU GET YOUR PUPPY
http://www.dogstardaily.com/files/BEFORE You Get Your Puppy.pdf

When choosing breeds, I knew I wanted a runner, googled a list and just went through every breed. I like the site, "What's good about em" You could look for a list of dog's with one of the traits you want or the most important trait. Ex: Dogs that Shed Very Little and then search through the breeds to see if there's a fit. I'm sure once you get a more accurate image of what you want, the people here can help as well. :)

WHAT'S GOOD ABOUT EM
http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/reviews/australianshepherds.html

DOGS THAT SHED VERY LITTLE
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/lightshedders.htm

My biggest advice is be honest with yourself when answering those questions by GottaLoveMutts and choose a puppy that fits in right with everyone in your family.
 

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Since you mentioned you might take your friend's puppy, I would suggest you look into getting a puppy versus getting an adult dog. This decision, regardless of what breed you decide on, makes a worrrld of difference. I have to admit I am guilty of underestimating just how much work raising a puppy is. Even after reading about the difficulties that come with each developmental period of a puppy's growth, experiencing the problems is so much worse than just reading about them.

If you have a loooot of time and you're willing to dedicate them to your puppy, then go for it. But if you don't have as much time, I would recommend an adult dog who's already been trained in basic things.
 

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I googled a lot of quizzes online (best dog breed for me) and put in info about myself and what I wanted from a dog and what a dog could expect from me... and it gave me my top options. I rescued a Wheaten instead but whatever... it's still nice to know .. its funny about what rough collie said because it's so true... or biggest problem is sap.... OMG.... the nightmares of matted sap fur LOL
 
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