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Yep, ou read that right. We're somewhat in the dark as to how to car for this little guy, and are in need of some(ok, a lot of) guidance. Here goes. Sorry for the long post, I tried to give a good description of the situation.

My brother convinced my father to "adopt" a dog, "Bob", who's owner is/was a "recovering" crackhead. He's apparently about a year old, and supposedly half collie, half coyote. His physical appearance does seem support the breeding, though his coloring is strange. He's black, mostly, with white fur on the tops of his feet, the backs of his front legs, a little under his tail, on his eyebrows, and in other places that would be small spots if he weren't long-haired and double-coated. He also seems to have a grey muzzle, but it could very well be more white fur mixed with the black. It's not completely grey either.

He also acts different from a lot of dogs, I think, but I'm no expert...all I've ever really had experience caring for is cats. I think it's probably important to tell that he had almost no contact with anyone/anything while his old owners had him, though he was fed and occasionally bathed by people in the neighborhood. (it took his owners three days to notice he was gone) He's very timid around new people, and takes a while to warm up to them until he's had a chance to examine him or they're with someone he already knows. Around people he knows, he's very calm, and likes to lick...a lot. Curiously, he seems to already be housetrained, or at least won't pee inside.

He seemed rather indifferent to my two cats, and he rolled over and whimpered when he got to close to one of them and she went after him. (she's very territorial :( ) This leads me to believe that he's submissive, but it's hard to tell because Pepper is a little demon cat when she's protecting her house, and he's definitely not the first dog to submit to her.

Around other dogs, he's very friendly and playful, though the only other dogs I've gotten the chance to see him with are my grandmother's dachsund and a mutt that he's known for quite a while.

There's also something about his eyes, and the way he looks at things. This may sound weird, but he seems a lot more intelligent than most dogs I've met, though he doesn't do a whole lot to show it. He seems like he's paying attention to things...focusing on them and analyzing them...it's very strange.


I'm not sure what all of that means, and I'm hoping you folks can help out...as all of it, I think, leads to the next question. How do we train and socialize him, and where do we start? AFAIK he's never been socialized except for with the neighbor's dog, but he seems really friendly towards other dogs. He's never really lived in a house (always either in a basement or in a pen outsede), but he seems housetrained. He's not leash trained at all, and really isn't sure what to do with one on, I don't think. I don't think knows his name, or at least won't answer to it, but he comes when we call every time.

Also, how should I introduce him to my families' dogs? My fiancee has two Redbones, one a 2 y.o. male and one a 6 m.o. female. They don't seem to be very territorial, so I think we'd be ok just introducing them face-to-face on leashes right?

The big problem would be her grandmother's dogs. Her grandma has three Austrailian Sheperds and an old grumpy Sheltie, and they are definitely a pack, with one of the males being very much the alpha. As I understand, this breed is fairly territorial, right? I'm at a loss here.

Now for the smaller issues: I think I'm ok on grooming...I've had help from the above-mentioned grandmother. We wash him fairly often, and use an undercoat brush at LEAST once weekly. We also use a normal brush to keep his tail untangled, and cut out the mats that pop up. We feed him Purina Beneful original...is that ok? Are we missing anything?

So...long post over, thank you very much to any and all comments and advice. None of us have ever had a dog like this before, so we're happy for all the help we can get.
 

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There's a great sticky on introducing dogs. I'd also be interested in seeing pictures as well. I don't think I would recommend any sort of mix of wild animal for a first time dog owner.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well...I'm not exactly a first-time owner...I always had a dog as a child. But, we never had herding dogs...it was always working-class. And he's a special case, you know? A wild mix AND a neglect victim makes for some interesting behavior that's making it difficult to train him. For example, the leash:

If I'm to understand correctly, leash training usually consists of making the dog heel instead of tugging on the leash, and making him understand that you're in the lead. But when you put a leash on Bob, he just sits there and stares at you, and tugs against any pressure applied to the leash. How do you leash train a dog that doesn't want to go anywhere?


I'll try to get some good pictures of him...all I have are some bad cameraphone pics. Neither of them really show him accurately.

He's a lot smaller than you'd expect. :confused:
Cameraphones hate low light :(


Just after we got him
 

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As far as the leash goes start out by letting him drag the leash when supervised (never when unsupervised) so that he gets used to the feel of collar and leash.

Once he's ignoring the leash dragging behind him, pick up the end and walk with him keeping the leash loose. This step gets him accustomed to the feel of someone holding the leash. Have some small yummy treats to reward him with periodically.

The final step is to get him to walk with you where you want to go. Again use rewards to make it a positive thing. One good reward is to take a wooden spoon and smear peanut butter on it. Whenever he comes in by your side, give him the spoon to lick as you walk. He'll soon learn that good things come when he's walking by your side.
 

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He's a handsome dog. What makes you think he's a coydog? (Just curious..lol). He looks pretty Border collie ish to me..but who knows? And small is normal for a coydog...Coyotes are NOT large canids, they are often around 40 lbs.

Skelaki had the leash thing right...and for a shy dog with little socialization positive reinforcement is the way to go. Get a whole bunch of different type treats (kibble, hotdogs, little pieces of chicken, freeze dried liver etc) all cut up into really really small bits and see which ones he prefers most, second, third etc. The reason for this is to help you (and him) in training the "hard stuff"..this is the stuff HE finds difficult or stressful. Those occasions call for the most high value rewards. The easier/lower stress behaviours can use the lower value treats.

I don't know how long you've had this guy, remember that dogs in new homes/environs often don't show their true colours for at least three months and that new behaviours will pop up as he truly starts to settle in. So be prepared. Don't let him and the cats be unsupervised and try not to introduce him to the grandmother's dogs (for his own well being) until you are SURE of his responses to other dogs over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks, all of you...this all helps a lot. I'm finding out just how uninformed I am. :(

I'll definitely work on getting him leash trained, and hold off on letting him meet the aussies, but I'm not sure if I can find a better food for him. My dad is the one who buys the dog food, at least until I can find a job, so I'm basically limited to what is sold at wal-mart. We live in a small town, so that's really all we have. Is there anything worth getting there? Wet food maybe?

He's definitely a Coydog, btw...he has most of the traits that one should have, like the thick fur on the inside of the ears, the piercing eyes, the light fur under the tail, and several other things. He also has the gentle, shy temperament of one, though I think the energetic herd-dog in him may be a little at-odds with that. Of course, we've only had him for 6 weeks or so...time will tell.
 

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Honestly, he looks nothing like a coydog... I'd bet he's a BC or Aussie mix. Herders have very piercing eyes to begin with. BCs especially have a tendency to stare and stalk.
 

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What does he lack that a coyote mix should have? Remember, he is half collie* as well.

*I do think it's more likely that he's half border collie...I imagine somewhere along the line someone figured they were the same thing.
 

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Every coydog I've ever seen had prick ears....I think it's dominant. And any mix of a coyote would almost certainly eat cats unless he was raised with them. So I don't think there's any coyote in there, either.

If you're stuck with Wal-Mart foods, Maxximum and Purina ONE are the best they sell. Well, Rachel Ray Nutrish is OK, but awfully overpriced, so I don't usually include that one.
 

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The regular Purina dog food or, better yet, Purina Pro-Plan are both available at Wal-Mart and either would be preferable to Beneful. I would probably choose Pro-Plan but either would be ok as long as the dog is and stays in good condition while eating them.
 

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So Purina/ONE/Pro-plan and Maxximum are all better, then? Odd that the basic stuff would be better. :confused:

I think I'll try for ONE first, I didn't see Pro-plan at out wal-mart. Thanks guys. :)


Oh, and as far as him being a coydog, the pictures really don't do him justice, so it's not really enough to go by. My phone's camera really distorts things. His ears are similar(not exact) to the BC's ears, though he usually holds them back. They aren't floppy. The head shape is really different, though. His muzzle is much more pointed than it appears in the pictures, and you can't really see the rest of him at all. I'm trying to find a proper camera, I promise!
 

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Beautiful dog, he reminds me alot of my tri color sheltie...looks like a sheltie mixed with bc or aussie to me. My shelties both have fur inside the ears and most dogs with tan points have light colored fur under the tail...my shelties have that too. Hoprfully Tirluc will chime in, she has had a coy-dog in the past and has bc's now.

As for food, I feed mine Purina One and they do very well on it.
 

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oh my god. what a beautiful dog.
for food, I don't like Purina personally.
I like Canidae, it's an all stages dry dog food. we've been feeding it to our puppy and when we asked out vet about improving food she said Canidae is a great food as it is.

I don't know what's available in your area, but if you can find Canidae where you live, give it a shot.

I'd add more but I don't know much about coydogs.
jeeze, if I had that dog (and the money), I'd be so curious I'd have to get a genetic test ahha.
 

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So Purina/ONE/Pro-plan and Maxximum are all better, then? Odd that the basic stuff would be better. :confused:
Beneful is an example of EXCELLENT marketing/advertising. It's basically the same ingredients as regular Dog Chow, but with extra food coloring so humans think it's better. And they get to charge twice as much for it :rolleyes: . Purina ONE at least has meat as the first ingredient. I think your dog should do fine on it.
 
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