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I have 2 dogs. Both are mid-sized male mutts ages 7 and 5. The 7 year old is not a problem but the 5 year old is very skiddish, nervous but still a good dog. We've had him since he was about 8 weeks old. He will not go to the bathroom on the first floor or in my bedroom where he spends his nights. But the other bedrooms on the second floor and the basement seem to be fair game.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to housebreak this dog so that the whole house is off limits to him when he needs to go to the bathroom? My only thought was to have myself and my kids spend time with him (maybe a room per week) in a room while on a leash. If they see him start to sniff around, take him outside, etc. It's a long process but I don't know what else to do and I'm tired of having a gate across the stairs, etc.

Thanks,
Matt
 

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Well, this is something you should have done five years ago but it's not too late! Housebreaking an older dog is no different than a puppy. The first thing to remember is that dogs have accidents but they're the humans fault. You need to keep eyes on him at all times. When you can't, tether him to you or crate him. If you don't have one, buy one. Take him out after meals (no free feeding), after playing, first thing in the morning and right before bed. Take him out on a leash. He needs to know it's time to potty. Use a term as you exit the house. We use "go potty". Praise the crap out of him when he goes, treat if you'd like to. Consistency is the key. If he goes in the house, go directly outside. You don't stop to put on shoes or jacjet, you just go so make sure you always have footwear on. I would suggest that an adult take him outside, you need to know when he's going.
As for the house, sometimes you have to manage the situations which means closing the doors.
 

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I agree. The biggest challenge, in my opinion, is that he's basically been given the "ok" to pee inside, as it's still going on. So, now you have to undo that. Act as if he was a puppy, and don't let him out of your sight. Good luck!
 

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I'll also add (which I'm surprised no one else has) THOROUGHLY clean up the places that he has gone before! No matter what you do, if he can still smell it (even when you don't) he'll likely see that as a spot that is ok to pee....since he has gone there before AND it smells like it!
Try Nature's Miracle or some other kind of enzymatic cleaner. Moving the furniture around in those rooms might also help, so that "familiar corner" isn't there any more or whatever (not sure that'll work, but its a thought).
 

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There are products available that help you train your pet to go toilet. Instinctively pets are territorial so if they smell a scent of another dog's pee they will be inclined to mark over the top of it.

Pet Loo developed "skip to my loo" which is a unique attractant that helps you to toilet train your best friend! www.thepetloo.com


The scent has been designed to attract and encourage your dog, or puppy to relieve itself in an area designated by you. It makes a perfect companion for The Pet Loo and can be used indoors or out.

So we're clear, Skip to my Loo is not a smelly extract of animal feces; instead it is a scientifically formulated solution that mimics animal urine which attract your puppy, it is easy to use and easy to apply.

Its important to note that constant praise and reward for doing the right thing will also ensure he / she does the right thing over and over again… they simply just want to please you!!
 
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