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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone
having alot of trouble getting my german short haired pointer bitch back when loosed off the lead. at the moment im confined to a small field where i am trying to improve her behavior. my girlfriend helps and sometimes the kids to. we corner her off and try and make her come back / obey commands. somedays are better than others. Food treats work sometimes but generally we try and make her obey and give food as a reward if she does. if disobeying goes into extra time we try and bribe her with food. one of my main questions is. should she be reward if she disobeys for about 20 minutes but then when i really raise my voice she then obeys and comes back. (which has happened a few times) or should we see this as a failure and not reward. my natually instict is to reward the dog but we still natually are a bit put out by her beavior. any advice on this subject is welcome. if it helps im sorry to admit generally we are to easy going with her. she is well loved (though in the house she is very obedient its only when off the lead have any trouble) and she is part of family first. dog 2nd.
Cheers and thanks
Ian
 

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Dogs live in the moment - the minute they do what you want, they should be rewarded (in my opinion). I try not to raise my voice though to get my point across - that may have a negative effect on the relationship between you and your puppers :)
 

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Yes of course you should reward your dog when she comes to you. Teaching her that coming when called = reward is very helpful in teaching recall.

Have you tried practicing with a long check cord so you can keep her from running amok? It sounds like you're asking too much, too soon.
 

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I agree she should be rewarded as soon as she does as asked. Have you tried calling her name while you run in the opposite direction? Dogs love to play chase, so running away can really help entice them to come to you! Even if you have someone hold onto her and then you run away, turn around really excited, and call her, she may be more inclined to come if she thinks it's a game.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello everyone
thanks for quick replies
hope shouting at her wont ruin our relationship long term she is much loved and knows it. (she does drive me to breaking point but only very occasionaly) . I will continue to reward her sausages then. she is still very young (1 year 4 months) and im far from giving up. did try long lead that worked okay till i turned my back for 10 seconds and she bit through it!
small area is working better. path did work fine till she got more confident and run amok in a miltary base!!
as for running in oppiste direction. reverse psycology has probably saved her life running away has made her follow me and taken her away from main roads on couple occasions when she has escaped ( i now swear on harness not a dog lead) although obviously dont really want to rely on reverse psycology longterm if i can help it ;)
 

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I would reward her every time she comes to you. Heck, at first I would reward her every time she looks at you.

I think you should practice in a smaller area with her closer to you for awhile. Start with her in your yard literally 3-4 feet away. When she's good at that, move farther. Gradually increase the distance. When you move to a more distracting area, go back to the shorter distance and work up. Practice walking around your yard and calling her, rewarding her, and turning her loose to "go play" in the yard multiple times so she doesn't associate recall with having to go inside.

Also, personally when you move to the big field I would practice with her on a long line (you can get 30' or longer training leashes at a variety of places). Every time you call her and she ignores you, she gets to practice ignoring you. 20 minutes is a long time to practice not listening to you. :)
 

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How many times are you calling her name before she returns to you?

People make the mistake that they continue to call while the dog is still running and minding his own business.
That in itself gives you information and continue to use the name or "Come here, Come, Come, Come..." it's losing it's power they more you use it.

Instead, work the dog in a controlled environment where the dog can't go off.

If you like a clicker, charge the dog on a clicker, if you rather use your voice than use a marker word, like YES! instead.

After that, use some High Quality Treats like Cheese. I like to use the Natural Balance Sausages. They make wonderful reward treats. Easy to cut and last for quite a while, the dogs love them.

However, toss that treat. As soon as your dog picks up that treat you call the dogs name ONCE(!!!), as soon as the dog turns towards you and comes back you click and toss another treat. The dog picks up the treat, you call his name and as soon as the dog turns and comes back you click and toss another treat.

On top of that you can do Crate Games by Susan Garrett. These games make a huge difference between you and your dogs relationship, overall impulse control and motivation to work with you.

While I worked one dog, the other one stayed on the platform.

You can also build yourself a platform. It's cheap but you can use it for many different things. You can use it to recall the dog and let them go into a down. You can use it to send a dog out, to place a dog and practice a long down.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTeWng1BT_Y&feature=relmfu

Point is, the dog always has to come back to YOU, during those exercises. Meaning, the dog interacts and engages with you. YOU become the resource, YOU become more interesting than anything else and that shows outside the training as well.
 

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I wouldn't have the dog off leash. Use a long line, call once, and if she doesn't come, walk over, get her attention (lift her head up to stop her sniffing or whatever) and then call again while running away from her. She comes, praise profusely, but don't reward. She should only get a reward if she didn't need your help to come running.

This should be practised indoors first. Does she reliably come when called indoors? If not, there is no point trying to do it outdoors in a field where there are distractions. Call her over inside the house several times a day, reward with her favourite thing. Could also do some restrained recalls (one person holds the dog, the other person runs away while calling the dog, when the dog is eager to run, the person holding her lets go).
 

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I wouldn't have the dog off leash. Use a long line, call once, and if she doesn't come, walk over, get her attention (lift her head up to stop her sniffing or whatever) and then call again while running away from her. She comes, praise profusely, but don't reward. She should only get a reward if she didn't need your help to come running.

This should be practised indoors first. Does she reliably come when called indoors? If not, there is no point trying to do it outdoors in a field where there are distractions. Call her over inside the house several times a day, reward with her favourite thing. Could also do some restrained recalls (one person holds the dog, the other person runs away while calling the dog, when the dog is eager to run, the person holding her lets go).

Much agreed.

Set the dog up to win. Until the command is very very solid, never give a command that you cannot enforce. Meaning, if you want to command "COME" than you need the dog on a long line so you can reel her back in or give tug. If the command was "STAY" you want to start out close enough to put the dog quickly back into a sit or a down.

20 minutes is a very long time not to obey "Come" which makes me think you might have burned the word. What I mean by that is the command has lost its meaning and she is only coming back when she feels like it, not in response to the command. One way to fix this is pick a new command like HERE and build that command while on a long line.

baby steps- start with low distractions and short distances (like room to room in the house) then out in the yard with calm/quiet at 20 feet, then 40 feet, then 100 feet, then with a small distraction in the yard at 20 ft etc
 

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Much agreed.

Set the dog up to win. Until the command is very very solid, never give a command that you cannot enforce. Meaning, if you want to command "COME" than you need the dog on a long line so you can reel her back in or give tug. If the command was "STAY" you want to start out close enough to put the dog quickly back into a sit or a down.

20 minutes is a very long time not to obey "Come" which makes me think you might have burned the word. What I mean by that is the command has lost its meaning and she is only coming back when she feels like it, not in response to the command. One way to fix this is pick a new command like HERE and build that command while on a long line.

baby steps- start with low distractions and short distances (like room to room in the house) then out in the yard with calm/quiet at 20 feet, then 40 feet, then 100 feet, then with a small distraction in the yard at 20 ft etc
THIS^^^. Your dog should not be off leash until it reliably comes when on a 50' line with high distractions. Right now you aren't teaching him anything except that he can disobey/ignore you.
 

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You might want to look into the re-call games:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HkQCdqbeK8&feature=youtu.be

I've been doing some of them naturally myself. The restrained re-call is an old classic. Fun games and bonding is a no-brainer.

Personally, I'm working on the formal re-call with food for competition obedience which looks like that:
What is important is that you engage and interact with your dog. She was out and about with a stick but as soon as I said "Komm her" (Come here) she came running, dropped the stick and started working. It didn't come naturally, three months ago I wouldn't have dared to work her off leash in this area.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPkfKQsI08M&list=UU53arc64fJClrMUdS1MVhWg&index=8&feature=plcp

We also learned from our trainer to go back to the food together. That keeps both of us moving and she has to stay with me.

They more you work with your dog, they more you bond, they more you bond, they more your dog wants to be with you and do stuff. They more stuff you do they better your dog listens.

Here is another one about the formal re-call
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXT3JjdRxaQ&feature=relmfu

First you have to do it in your home. If your dog is food driven, it's perfect. That will help you. If not, you have to work on that first.

Play around with your dog. Have fun. Do stuff, bond... for example, we discovered the target stick.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvKyKhXCuno

And then keep working
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5lWxHHaF2M&list=UU53arc64fJClrMUdS1MVhWg&feature=plcp

Also, do those crate games. They help a LOT with pretty much EVERYTHING obedience wise
 
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