Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys

My 3 months old labra isnt able to walk properly and the condition seems to be getting worse with time. Here is a video that shows his present condition.
YouTube - Labrador Dog: My name is courage - Help me walk again

What Vets say?
The part of world I live in, Vet science isnt very well developed and docs are just guessing and injecting anything and everything they can find on the shelves. The condition didn't improve... so I decided to put it online. So, I am pretty much depending upon help from you guys.

Please help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
I honestly have no idea what's going on with your pup, but it seems really bad! When did the shaking begin? Or was the pup always like this? Hopefully someone will be able to provide some kind of advice to you soon. I wish you and your dog the best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Is it a muscle disorder of some kind? So sad that your pup has to go through this.
Muscle, Neurological, Bones... I really have no idea what it is.... neither the vets around me have any idea. I am on a mission to get my courage walking again... Wish me and Courage luck :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Have you taken x-rays or some type of scans? Is it his whole body that shakes? Is just the rear legs that seem to cause a problem when trying to walk or all four?

It seemed his rears were the issue, but it was hard to tell at times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Have you taken x-rays or some type of scans?
No X-Rays scans yet. Doctors never asked for it. An another dog from same mother is suffering from same problem... So... it doesnt seem to be a case of bone injury.

Is it his whole body that shakes? Is just the rear legs that seem to cause a problem when trying to walk or all four?

It seemed his rears were the issue, but it was hard to tell at times.
His rear legs only have this problem. We sometimes wrap his hind legs with a towel or a long piece of cloth while holding the ends to support his hind legs... and he is able to walk properly. This gives him confidence to walk again and he is active for a while..

The shaking too comes from his rear part only (I guess)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
Has he ever had canine distemper? It can cause neurological problems, so they can walk like that.

Have you ever done water/swim therapy with him? Might help him redevelop the muscles/motor skills needed to help him use his legs properly.

Could you get your vets to xray his spine? Also do blood tests for tick borne diseases (like Lyme) if they are present in your area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,633 Posts
Lots of people/animals/pets sufer from SOMETHING...It broke my heart watching your little pup just trying to do some of the most BASIC things that pups usually enjoy...HE seems not to notice theres anything wrong with him so far...*good for him*!!! I also commend you for "going outside of the box", & opening up suggestions about your dogs health/wellbeing...I am sure, that collectively, across the many boards that you have appealed your plea to, that SOMEONE is bound to have some good advice for you. Much luck from me is being sent to your pup as I type...poor little fellah:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Has he ever had canine distemper? It can cause neurological problems, so they can walk like that.
He is just 3 months old and he had his canine distemper vaccination on schedule. Are the any chances that the vaccination may have failed to prevent him from the virus?

Have you ever done water/swim therapy with him? Might help him redevelop the muscles/motor skills needed to help him use his legs properly.
Yep! Doctors were doing HYDRO THERAPY by putting him in a tub of water and giving him time to exercise. But I think swimming will be better for him.

Could you get your vets to xray his spine? Also do blood tests for tick borne diseases (like Lyme) if they are present in your area.
Vets have not recommended any Xrays but I am getting one done soon. Blood tests were done to see HB, TLC, DLC and reports were normal. However, blood test for diseases for Lyme (ELISA or IFA) was not done. I am out to get these reports for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
Dogs can get distemper even though vaccinated. Some breeds are more likely to not ever develop a full immunity. My vet mentioned Huskies as one of those breeds. Puppies are more at risk of Distemper, even if vaccinated, because they haven't had time to build strong immune systems. Usually w/distemper you see a loss of appetite, and a fever that keeps spiking. You might try taking his temperature daily. Normal temp is around 99-101. (Lyme can also cause fevers that spike randomly).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,440 Posts
Is there a reward... JUST KIDDING! Several things come to mind with me. Most obvious brain trauma. Then wobblers syndrom, muscular dystrophy (most likely) and HOD, Possibly (remotely possible) insectacide/toxic poisoning.

HOD- Cause of hypertrophic osteodystrophy http://www.vetsurgerycentral.com/hod.htm

The cause of hypertrophic osteodystrophy in dogs is largely unknown. Proposed causes include distemper virus infection, vaccination with distemper virus, bacterial infection and other viral infections. Vitamin C deficiency is unlikely to be a cause of this disease, as previously believed. A series of events take place at the microscopic level within the affected bones. First, the blood vessels near the growth plate become distended and bleed into the bone. Next, the bone in this region dies, gets resorbed and develops microfracturing due to weakening of the bone structure (photo: see arrow). In response to this, new bone is laid on the surface of the bone (photo: see star).

Wobblers- http://petsurgery.com/wobblersyndrome.html
Initial signs of weakness and incoordination occur rapidly and are most apparent in the hindlimbs. The clinical signs worsen slowly over succeeding weeks. The hindlimbs often are spread wider apart than normal, causing the hindquarters to sway from side to side. The hindlimbs may not fully extend, causing a crouched posture with the toes scuffing on the ground with each step. The degree of forelimb involvement varies from no observable abnormality to an obvious stiffness and awkward use of the forelimbs. In mild cases, or early in the disease, these signs may be most obvious as the dog turns corners, and may be less apparent when the dog walks or runs along a straight path. An abrupt change in speed or direction may exacerbate the neurological signs.

Hereditary Myopathy (muscular distrophy. THIS ONE warrants MUCH more research on your part since it IS hereditary and another pup in the litter is afflicted)-http://www.labbies.com/hmlr.htm
Skeletal muscle myopathy is a hereditary muscle disorder in which there is a deficiency of type II muscle fibers leading to a notable decrease in skeletal muscle mass. Although several breeds of dogs have been observed to demonstrate similar disorders, this condition is only seen in Labrador retrievers and was first reported and described in 1976. In 1981, the same researchers characterized the mode of inheritance in Labradors and since that time the condition has been referred to as "Hereditary Myopathy of Labrador Retrievers" (HMLR). Other names for HMLR include muscular dystrophy, myotonia, generalized muscle weakness, polyneuropathy, and hereditary myopathy.

Muscle weakness, abnormal gait and posture, and a decrease in tolerance to exercise are the most common symptoms affecting Labradors with HMLR. On the average, onset of symptoms usually occur at 3-4 months of age, however, some dogs demonstrate symptoms as early as 6-8 weeks or as late as 6-7 months of age. Abnormalities in gait and posture include a short, stilted stride, "bunny-hopping," low head posture and an arched back. These symptoms become more obvious as the exercise continues and the dog tires or if the dog is exposed to cold weather. Eventually, if not allowed to rest or to keep warm, the dog may temporarily collapse. Rest improves symptoms but follow-up exercise quickly brings on a relapse. Other signs of HMLR include abnormalities of the joints including "splay-foot", "cow-hocking" and hip dysplasia. Additionally, as the disease progresses, atrophy of the muscles in the limbs and head becomes apparent.

This site has a number of theraputic wraps that can help stabilize your dog's legs and even custom make wraps for your specific needs http://www.dogleggs.com/
Something like this I presume could help (rear leg hobbles)


It's highly unlikely that this is distemper as there would be obvious other signs such as diareah, vomiting, runny nose, eyes, feaver etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,065 Posts
It definitely looks like a neurological disorder and does remind me of a distemper surviver I saw that had servere brain damage, but dogs with distemper are usually really really ill with runny eyes, runny poo, and alot of other issues. Is it just progressively getting worse?

EDIT:eek:ops I didn't see DogShrink had posted the same thing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,104 Posts
I think it's more likely a hereditary problem since there is another in the litter with the same symptoms.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,440 Posts
That is why I added hereditary myopathy to the list as the greatest potential but both wobblers and HOD can be hereditary or incidental.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
It looks neurological to me. I have a daughter with cerebral palsy and recognize the "tangled up" legs and the shaking. It looks like the signals from the brain to legs are delayed, the signals are getting there but not in time for the body to respond correctly. The crossing legs and shakiness also shows up in neurological conditions. I would work with the swimming and try to build some core strength for the pup. I would also look at adding more protein into his diet. From the video it looks like his diet is carb based and you really need more protein to help with muscle function.

Best of luck in finding help for this little cutie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
One thing is for sure... that they have this hereditary and Vets here have put both the pups on steroids now. The doc has prescribed carefully calculated dosage for a week in tapering format.

We are seeing drastic improvements within first dose and its improving with every passing day. He is able to walk a little, not that confidently, but is atleast able to pee and poo by himself. (he even climbed the sofa today :) )

I believe steroids along with Hydro therapy may do wonders in this case.

Is there a reward... JUST KIDDING! Several things come to mind with me. Most obvious brain trauma. Then wobblers syndrom, muscular dystrophy (most likely) and HOD, Possibly (remotely possible) insectacide/toxic poisoning.

HOD- Cause of hypertrophic osteodystrophy http://www.vetsurgerycentral.com/hod.htm

The cause of hypertrophic osteodystrophy in dogs is largely unknown. Proposed causes include distemper virus infection, vaccination with distemper virus, bacterial infection and other viral infections. Vitamin C deficiency is unlikely to be a cause of this disease, as previously believed. A series of events take place at the microscopic level within the affected bones. First, the blood vessels near the growth plate become distended and bleed into the bone. Next, the bone in this region dies, gets resorbed and develops microfracturing due to weakening of the bone structure (photo: see arrow). In response to this, new bone is laid on the surface of the bone (photo: see star).
It certainly is not HOD as FEVER is NOT there.

Wobblers- http://petsurgery.com/wobblersyndrome.html
Initial signs of weakness and incoordination occur rapidly and are most apparent in the hindlimbs. The clinical signs worsen slowly over succeeding weeks. The hindlimbs often are spread wider apart than normal, causing the hindquarters to sway from side to side. The hindlimbs may not fully extend, causing a crouched posture with the toes scuffing on the ground with each step. The degree of forelimb involvement varies from no observable abnormality to an obvious stiffness and awkward use of the forelimbs. In mild cases, or early in the disease, these signs may be most obvious as the dog turns corners, and may be less apparent when the dog walks or runs along a straight path. An abrupt change in speed or direction may exacerbate the neurological signs.
Very much possible. But since they are responding to Steroids... I dont think its Wobblers syndrome. If it was, the pressure in spinal cord would not have made them respond to Steroids.

Furthermore,
Their walk patterns are quite different than the symptoms mentioned in the Wobblers effect.....like in wobblers, pups walk in crouched position and hind limbs spread wider than normal.... But thats not the case in these pups.


Hereditary Myopathy (muscular distrophy. THIS ONE warrants MUCH more research on your part since it IS hereditary and another pup in the litter is afflicted)-http://www.labbies.com/hmlr.htm
Skeletal muscle myopathy is a hereditary muscle disorder in which there is a deficiency of type II muscle fibers leading to a notable decrease in skeletal muscle mass. Although several breeds of dogs have been observed to demonstrate similar disorders, this condition is only seen in Labrador retrievers and was first reported and described in 1976. In 1981, the same researchers characterized the mode of inheritance in Labradors and since that time the condition has been referred to as "Hereditary Myopathy of Labrador Retrievers" (HMLR). Other names for HMLR include muscular dystrophy, myotonia, generalized muscle weakness, polyneuropathy, and hereditary myopathy.

Muscle weakness, abnormal gait and posture, and a decrease in tolerance to exercise are the most common symptoms affecting Labradors with HMLR. On the average, onset of symptoms usually occur at 3-4 months of age, however, some dogs demonstrate symptoms as early as 6-8 weeks or as late as 6-7 months of age. Abnormalities in gait and posture include a short, stilted stride, "bunny-hopping," low head posture and an arched back. These symptoms become more obvious as the exercise continues and the dog tires or if the dog is exposed to cold weather. Eventually, if not allowed to rest or to keep warm, the dog may temporarily collapse. Rest improves symptoms but follow-up exercise quickly brings on a relapse. Other signs of HMLR include abnormalities of the joints including "splay-foot", "cow-hocking" and hip dysplasia. Additionally, as the disease progresses, atrophy of the muscles in the limbs and head becomes apparent.

This site has a number of theraputic wraps that can help stabilize your dog's legs and even custom make wraps for your specific needs http://www.dogleggs.com/
Something like this I presume could help (rear leg hobbles)


It's highly unlikely that this is distemper as there would be obvious other signs such as diareah, vomiting, runny nose, eyes, feaver etc.
Myopathy definitely seems the closest match. Humans with myopathy show signs of recovery with steroids and so are they. I hope they get well with this.

Till that time, I am also trying to look for Ayurvedic or Homeopathic treatments of the same thing. These 2 sciences claim doing wonders and I guess its time I need to put their claims to test.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top