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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
my 2.5yr old lab snapped and bit my 3yr old beagle's ears every time someone picks the beagle up or after they were separated (eg. after the beagle came back from the vet and she was left at home) and also every time neighbour dogs pass by the fence.

other than this the lab is usually gentle and nice. she likes to exercise very much, she wouldn't stop swimming on a hot day and will beg me to play fetch with her every evening but she is very clumsy (i dont know if it's usual for a labrador) she often slip and fall when running in full speed and often hit her head on the fence when trying to catch ball.

she does not associate with other dogs, she only plays with the beagle whereas the beagle is very good with any dogs she just met. the lab will not play with my friends she just met. she would watch them play with the beagle from a distant for awhile and then start to sniff them carefully before she can relax around them. she didn't get to socialized as a puppy because she caught parvovirus just a few day after i got her.

other than that she is quite normal for a labrabor her age.

what can i do to fix this?
 

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It sounds like your Lab is getting overexcited. Most Labs are high energy dogs (yours sounds like it fits the bill) and they need lots of exercise, lots of mental stimulation, and strict guidelines as to acceptable behavior. Solid--formal--obedience training makes most minor problems (like this one sounds) just go away.

Exercise without structure may physically exhaust a Lab (if you have enough time in your day), but it reinforces a Lab's excitable nature. Chasing a ball is fine unless the dog sets the rules and it devolves into a game of keep-away. That doesn't solve any problems, and will create some new ones. Play lots of games but enforce the rules--like sit-at-heel and a proper delivery to hand.

The "clumsy" thing may just be strong drive at work. My Golden crashes into stuff and does flips and tumbles when going for a retrieve. If I throw a ball and it bounces under my car, he tries to dive under the car without slowing down at all. He's never going to fit. He gets so focused on the retrieve object that he loses any thought for his own safety. It's a wonder he hasn't broken his fool neck by now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thank very much march muppet

that sounds like something i can try.
i just saw recently that the lab is getting more aggressive when biting the beagle's ear. i hope that i can this before there is any serious injury :)

yes, my lab is very energetic. every time i give them each a hollow ball that can stuff treats inside the lab will just hold the ball in her mouth and run very fast around the yard and the beagle will get all the treats that fall out.

how old is your golden retriever? one my friends told me that this clumsy and high energy thing will go away when she gets older?
 

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yes, my lab is very energetic. every time i give them each a hollow ball that can stuff treats inside the lab will just hold the ball in her mouth and run very fast around the yard and the beagle will get all the treats that fall out.
LOL! That's the Labrador Retrievers I know!

how old is your golden retriever? one my friends told me that this clumsy and high energy thing will go away when she gets older?
My guy just turned 3 years old last month. You would be making a mistake if you were to expect him to outgrow this "phase" before he's about 10 years old. "Reckless" is is a pretty good one word description for my lunatic. He's not as bad as Zim's Bolo, but he's quite the canine crash dummy compared to most dogs. If your dog is really a klutz, you might want to have him checked by the vet. Otherwise, it's probably a combination of typical Labrador hyperdrive combined with less-than-optimal physical conditioning.

Proper conditioning combined with training will help the dog calm down, and prevent injuries. Flyball and agility are good outlets for such a beast. Get a good retriever training program and train for a hunt test (or take up duck hunting), and you will see him blossom into the terrific animal he was meant to be. Training is a big commitment, but I guarantee you'll all be happier a year from now if you undertake it.
 

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It sounds like the lack of socialization of the lab has caused some fear and frustration issues, ie attacking the beagle when it returns from the vet (she smells like the grooming or the vet's office and not like "herself", we used to hear this all the time at the vet's if their are two or more animals at home, though it was often more common with cats).
Biting of the ears can sometimes be play...has the beagle's ears been injured at all? How does she react when he does this?

I would add some more training and structured exercise to both of the dog's schedules. Walking, working on leave it and recall (leave it for when the lab is overdoing it on the beagle) and teaching hand targeting using positive reinforcement methods can help manage the behaviour.

As for barking or 'attacking' the dogs as they pass by the fence. How much time does your lab spend outside in the fenced yard? Barrier frustration can result in a lot of issues, not the least of which is behaviours like displaced aggression, digging, excessive barking etc. I would condition the dog to see the other dogs as a good thing, a dog walks by your dog gets recalled and rewarded. Or use a version of Look At That...maybe "HEAR THAT?" but this would mean YOU would have to be out there with the dogs whenever they are there to work on the training.

The idea behind LAT is to let the dog NOTICE or SEE the trigger, click the clicker or mark with a marker word (I find the clicker much more effective) and reward the dog when he turns his head towards you. This means he gets to 'check out' momentarily the object of his focus but immediately returns his attention to you and is rewarded for it. If you click BEFORE the bark and craziness happens you are 1/interrupting the behaviour, which eventually will diminish the behaviour from happening and 2/rewarding the dog for the quiet attention.

The extra benefits of this kind of work is that it helps to encourage impulse control in dogs which is an all around good thing.
 

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This is another thread on which OP mentions no training. Just for giggles try a cologne spray on Beagle at home a few times so Lab gets used to it, next trip to Vet spray after leaving Vet's office and see if there is any change in Lab. I don't have a clue as to whether it will do anything but it might be interesting to try.
I would ditto MM's training recommendations.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
has the beagle's ears been injured at all? How does she react when he does this?

As for barking or 'attacking' the dogs as they pass by the fence. How much time does your lab spend outside in the fenced yard?
only minor injury, a few marks (quite big) on the beagle's ears but there is no serious injury. the beagle barks and looks like she tries to fight back but i'm not sure. the beagle is very playful though. she plays with any animal and anyone she encounters.

the dogs have their own yard (about 8m by 20m) and can access freely a small part of the living room. they spend most of the time in the yard and whenever i am home i would spend most of the time in their yard too. other family members often go into the yard and check on them on a regular basis. they are taken outside of their yard for about 15-30 mins almost every day but still in a fenced area (almost a hectare). about once every few months i'd take them to a nearby waterfall.

Proper conditioning combined with training will help the dog calm down, and prevent injuries. Flyball and agility are good outlets for such a beast. Get a good retriever training program and train for a hunt test (or take up duck hunting), and you will see him blossom into the terrific animal he was meant to be. Training is a big commitment, but I guarantee you'll all be happier a year from now if you undertake it.
In a year I should have enough time to get them properly trained. can't wait til i'm done with my study :). it may be hard though because i live in a country which dog training is not very common yet and most courses are offered by police force.

This is another thread on which OP mentions no training. Just for giggles try a cologne spray on Beagle at home a few times so Lab gets used to it, next trip to Vet spray after leaving Vet's office and see if there is any change in Lab.
after reading your comment i sprayed some cologne on the beagle. she sneezes and looks confused:D. i'll try this trick next time she goes to the vet.
 

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Yes the spray thing probably kinda stupid but it's one of those things that if it don't help it's not gonna hurt the problem and at least you end up with a good dog smell. Spray before you come back from vet and rub spray in with your hands over body so most smell will be you and dog.
 

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In a year I should have enough time to get them properly trained. can't wait til i'm done with my study :). it may be hard though because i live in a country which dog training is not very common yet and most courses are offered by police force.
You didn't say what country you reside in. If there are no retriever training clubs, a Schutzhund club will work out great. Labs don't tend to excel in bite work, but that's the last phase of police dog training. The basic obedience training and tracking will be enough to give the dog an outlet for her energy and desire to work. Your Beagle would benefit from that as well. There are tons of books to get you started as well as a number of free resources (check the links at the top of the training forum).
 
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