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Ok, so Wembley is about 4 months old now. Human child, Ethan in 7 years old, has ADHD and a tendency to impulsive goofiness.

Wembley is teething and overall trying to treat Ethan like a fellow Puppy. Of course this is painful for Ethan who decides the best course of action is to curl up in ball on the floor or run, or even goad the dog on. No matter how many times I tell him not to run and climb the furniture like a cat, no matter how many times I tell him to stay calm, say ouch loudly and give the dog something appropriate to chew on, he just doesn't seem to listen. Part of it is that he LIKES getting Wembley all worked up....but it doesn't stop him from coming and crying to me that "Wembley BIT ME!" every time he gets a little scrape from those sharp puppy teeth.

My biggest concern about this is that he is pretty much teaching Wembley that chewing on children's toes is FUN!

Anyone have experience dealing with impulsive, goofy kids and teething puppies?
 

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Remember the beauty of positive reinforcement.....It works on ALL species! Find Ethan's favorite reinforcer and let him earn it when he plays appropriately with the puppy. Matchbox cars? Food treats? TV time (use a whiteboard and add a mark for every 10 seconds he plays nicely....one slash = 1 min.) You will have to choose what will work best, but please remember to choose something that Ethan LOVES! Keep the reinforcement level very high in the beginning. You need to teach that playing "correctly" is better than working the pup into a lather.....or better than the attention he receives from crying to you. I would also buy special "Ethan"puppy toys....Take him to the pet store and let your son choose a few dog toys that only he gets to use to interact with Wembley. Choose several that will help exercise and alleviate puppy boredom while keeping those teeth off skin. Also hoping that you are crate training the pup, that way you can control interactions between these two. If you aren't around to supervise (and train BOTH of them) then Wembley is crated with a stuffed kong.
I personally don't teach young children to say "ouch", their squeaky kid voices usually do no more than entice puppies. And I wouldn't ask him to walk away either, I would keep the pup on a leash and remove him if needed. The climbing the furniture and curling into a ball will extinguish as long as you completely ignore it. Hope this helps.
 

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YES YES YES

I was about to rip my hair out when Brody was biting the kids and they were running around screaming which worked him up, so I started yelling which worked everyone up... and it was a hot mess. I don't know how to fix it, I am sorry... after a few months of teething it just got easier for us.
 

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Sounds a bit like my house. My 7 year old son loves working the dog up to near breaking point. Then gets upset when Bosco bits his toes. He will see my son coming and instantly get over excited. I think...not sure...it's a result of their over active play times together. My son can't understand why Bosco wants to play with him all the time. Even after me repeating over and over, that if he's going to play rough and tumble with the dog and get him worked up, he's going to expect it all the time. The dog also seems to have some sort of like for my sons ears. Goes for them all the time. We've taken to putting a leash on Bosco all the time, and (from Cesar Milan) giving him a quick tug when he's doing something he shouldn't be. Hoping this helps both the dog and the kid learn!
 

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Remember the beauty of positive reinforcement.....It works on ALL species! Find Ethan's favorite reinforcer and let him earn it when he plays appropriately with the puppy. Matchbox cars? Food treats? TV time (use a whiteboard and add a mark for every 10 seconds he plays nicely....one slash = 1 min.) You will have to choose what will work best, but please remember to choose something that Ethan LOVES! Keep the reinforcement level very high in the beginning. You need to teach that playing "correctly" is better than working the pup into a lather.....or better than the attention he receives from crying to you. I would also buy special "Ethan"puppy toys....Take him to the pet store and let your son choose a few dog toys that only he gets to use to interact with Wembley. Choose several that will help exercise and alleviate puppy boredom while keeping those teeth off skin. Also hoping that you are crate training the pup, that way you can control interactions between these two. If you aren't around to supervise (and train BOTH of them) then Wembley is crated with a stuffed kong.
I personally don't teach young children to say "ouch", their squeaky kid voices usually do no more than entice puppies. And I wouldn't ask him to walk away either, I would keep the pup on a leash and remove him if needed. The climbing the furniture and curling into a ball will extinguish as long as you completely ignore it. Hope this helps.
:hail::hail::hail: These are very good suggestions ...
 

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Wouldn't work with Izze, she would treat him like a cow & he more he screamed & ran, the more she would go after them lol, which is why I have dogs ..... Not kids.
 

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Remember the beauty of positive reinforcement.....It works on ALL species! Find Ethan's favorite reinforcer and let him earn it when he plays appropriately with the puppy. Matchbox cars? Food treats? TV time (use a whiteboard and add a mark for every 10 seconds he plays nicely....one slash = 1 min.) You will have to choose what will work best, but please remember to choose something that Ethan LOVES! Keep the reinforcement level very high in the beginning. You need to teach that playing "correctly" is better than working the pup into a lather.....or better than the attention he receives from crying to you. I would also buy special "Ethan"puppy toys....Take him to the pet store and let your son choose a few dog toys that only he gets to use to interact with Wembley. Choose several that will help exercise and alleviate puppy boredom while keeping those teeth off skin. Also hoping that you are crate training the pup, that way you can control interactions between these two. If you aren't around to supervise (and train BOTH of them) then Wembley is crated with a stuffed kong.
I personally don't teach young children to say "ouch", their squeaky kid voices usually do no more than entice puppies. And I wouldn't ask him to walk away either, I would keep the pup on a leash and remove him if needed. The climbing the furniture and curling into a ball will extinguish as long as you completely ignore it. Hope this helps.
This is fantastic advice ... I wish I would have had this advice when my oldest Son with ADD was small ... it would have helped the endless hours of commotion in my household! :)
 

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Old school life was much simpler you put dog and kid in room, shut door whichever one makes it out alive you kept. I suppose nowadays that does not work cause everybody has to win and get a trophy or ribbon. Oh for the good old days.
 

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Yes your right wvasko..... let's just let the puppy chew on her child and if the child doesn't handle it well or gets hurt....well that's just too damn bad. Better yet, lets send the dog to live outside tied to a tree, since in the good old days, dogs were nothing more than pieces of property. This whole being a part of the family and trying to teach manners thing is complete crap.
 

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Yes your right wvasko..... let's just let the puppy chew on her child and if the child doesn't handle it well or gets hurt....well that's just too damn bad. Better yet, lets send the dog to live outside tied to a tree, since in the good old days, dogs were nothing more than pieces of property. This whole being a part of the family and trying to teach manners thing is complete crap.
Oh my, truth be told, but the room/kids thing was not ever used. (It was my poor attempt at humor) I did say it was a simpler life, actually never had a problem in my family as when I was a kid either the offending dog got a boot in the butt for bad family manners or I did for not being fast enough to avoid the dog. 1 or 2 boots and it was a done deal. Sometimes dog and I both got a boot. Trust me family manners were a big deal and not to be trifled with.

Come to think of it "back in the good old days" ADHD was way in the future as this was back in the days of no TV or if you were lucky 1st TV might be a 12 inch black & white. A lot of us were uncivilized savages back then. It's amazing how some of our families & crap survived at all.

My apologies to those who thought the room/kids program was the way dog/family manners should be handled.
 

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Off topic, but wvasko, maybe you should come and live in Asia? It's still the "good old days" here. where teachers in school still use the cane to hit us for: not finishing homework, answering questions wrong, coming to school late, not coming to school, etc.

My parents would've personally used a metal hanger to hit me (or my brothers) for bothering our dog (if we had one anyway). Hahaha. Just the way it is here. You'd feel right at home!
 

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Off topic, but wvasko, maybe you should come and live in Asia? It's still the "good old days" here. where teachers in school still use the cane to hit us for: not finishing homework, answering questions wrong, coming to school late, not coming to school, etc.

My parents would've personally used a metal hanger to hit me (or my brothers) for bothering our dog (if we had one anyway). Hahaha. Just the way it is here. You'd feel right at home!
I am familiar with the coat hanger method of child raising and also the use of something called a Garrison belt massaging my butt. Our son was raised with no bruises, just an occasional hand swat on the butt. It's not off topic as help raising child is title of thread.

Not complaining, I survived.
 

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OK, OK ! :hand: Just ... put the coat hangers and belts AWAY, people ... please. lol

The OP might wanna peruse "Don't Shoot the Dog" by Karen Pryor. It's 21st century-type stuff, at it's finest. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the advice everyone. The rewards for the 7yo seem like a good idea. He has a bucket full of a variety of rewards he gets to choose from when I randomly catch him behaving. It's gotten him over a couple of bad habits and helped to reduce the frequency of a few others.

I am crate training Wembley. Unfortunately, if I crated him for any time that I'm not able to carefully supervise them, they wouldn't get to interact much and Wembley would be in his crate a lot more than he should. From the time the get home from school, to the time that the kids go to bed, I'm very busy with supper and chores and often with Ethan's older brother Tarok who has mitochondrial disease and needs extra help with everything. So, I do have to supervise by ear from the other room. I guess I could encourage them to play in the kitchen while I'm making dinner, or tether Wembley in there with me on his long leash.

Thanks for the help everyone :D
 
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