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So I've had this dog for three years now, and overall she's very good. The one thing that I'd like to change is the way she interacts other dogs.

She has been raised with other dogs and acts normally around them, but any time we see another dog besides the two she was raised around, she starts making crying/baying noises and desperately wants to get to them. This of course often gets other dogs very worked up and I'm worried that she'll start a fight or draw an aggressive dog to attack. If we do go up to another dog, she wants to sniff them but appears scared when they want to sniff back and mostly runs away. We do have a dog park in the area, but I'm concerned about letting her off-leash there to socialize for the same reasons.

What I would ultimately like is to have her more calm and interacting normally with dogs outside the ones she knows well.
 

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I also have a problem with socializing my puppy, and there are a ton of people here that can probably give you a lot better advice.
What I've been doing mostly with my pup, is getting him used to the other dogs really slowly. We always go to the same pet store and the owner there has three dogs, so he's seen them tons of times, getting a bit closer to them every time. We've also been seeing another little puppy on our walks and after 3 days, today was the first day they would actually be able to get close enough (about half-way calm) to sniff each other. But we stopped there, to not get them too worked up.

Again, I'm really inexperienced with this, so this might not be the best way. I just figure it's better to keep things slow and as calm as possible, even if it means sometimes taking a step back.
 

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May's really not far off. Her advice to take it slow and be willing to step back is great. Progress in these sorts of situations is often in fits and starts, with setbacks along the way.

For an adult dog that is acting aggressively towards other dogs (either out of fear or dog aggression, it doesn't really matter), I'd start further back than a pet store. Go somewhere dogs go, like a dog park. Now figure out how far away from other dogs your dog has to be to see them, but not react. That's where you start. Praise and treat this calm behavior. Slowly, over the course of weeks, move closer. If she's calm, reward, if she's not, move back.

You may never end up with a dog that can play nicely with strange dogs at a dog park, but that's okay. Behaving on a walk is a reachable goal.
 

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So I've had this dog for three years now, and overall she's very good. The one thing that I'd like to change is the way she interacts other dogs.

She has been raised with other dogs and acts normally around them, but any time we see another dog besides the two she was raised around, she starts making crying/baying noises and desperately wants to get to them. This of course often gets other dogs very worked up and I'm worried that she'll start a fight or draw an aggressive dog to attack. If we do go up to another dog, she wants to sniff them but appears scared when they want to sniff back and mostly runs away. We do have a dog park in the area, but I'm concerned about letting her off-leash there to socialize for the same reasons.

What I would ultimately like is to have her more calm and interacting normally with dogs outside the ones she knows well.
The others have given good directions .. I just wanted to add some areas for you to work on yourself to help your dog. the whole travels down the leash to the dog imput is true.
 

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May's really not far off. Her advice to take it slow and be willing to step back is great. Progress in these sorts of situations is often in fits and starts, with setbacks along the way.

For an adult dog that is acting aggressively towards other dogs (either out of fear or dog aggression, it doesn't really matter), I'd start further back than a pet store. Go somewhere dogs go, like a dog park. Now figure out how far away from other dogs your dog has to be to see them, but not react. That's where you start. Praise and treat this calm behavior. Slowly, over the course of weeks, move closer. If she's calm, reward, if she's not, move back.

You may never end up with a dog that can play nicely with strange dogs at a dog park, but that's okay. Behaving on a walk is a reachable goal.
Thanks to everyone for the advice, I think this is a good place to start. Often she will start up as soon as she can see/smell another dog but I'll see just how far away we can get and still be in eyeshot!
 

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The previous inputs are great. :)
Another thing you can try is asking a friend with a dog that your dog hasn't met before to help you out. Bring both your dogs to a quiet area with no blatant distractions, like an empty park with a wide-open field. Ask your friend and her dog to walk far in front of you while you and your dog follow. The distance your friend is in front depends on when your dog stops baying/going crazy.. which could be 25 yards away, or 50 meters. Start at this steady pace, following your friend from a distance. Whenever your dog starts to bay, go "ah ah" and turn around and walk the opposite direction (while your friend keeps moving forward), thus lengthening the distance between your dog and your friend's dog. When your dog quiets down, you can turn back around and begin following from a distance again. Repeat this pattern and your dog will slowly become accustomed to the other dog and realize that baying will not help her cause in meeting the other dog. Eventually, they'll be able to meet calmly.

What your dog clearly wants is to meet the other dog, and thinks that she will be able to get there by barking/baying/lunging. Remember to never LET her meet the other dog under these circumstances, as it will reinforce her belief that "if I bay/bark, then I'll get to meet the other dog!" The concept of this method is to teach her that she will only be able to meet the other dog if she stays calm and quiet, but in a slow and steady, but sure-fire way.

It's best to try this planned method with more than one dog of course- I hope you have more than 3 friends with dogs that your dog hasn't met before. :) Good luck.
 

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When you go to the dogpark, there should be times when the 'regulars' are there. Usually, they will have socialized dogs. You might approach them and explain your situation. I believe that if you find other dogs that you can trust, then you'll be able to let your dog off leash to sniff or retreat as needed.
 

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Thanks to everyone for the advice, I think this is a good place to start. Often she will start up as soon as she can see/smell another dog but I'll see just how far away we can get and still be in eyeshot!
With my old dog, it was over 100' away. It took a long time to train him to behave on a leash, but it was worth it.
 

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This has helped us hugely. Snowball has the same problem as your dog. Instead of regulars at the dog park (Snowball isn't always the nicest to single dogs when he's by himself), we go for scheduled off-leash group walks, and I think its really helped. At the very least, its not hurting and I feel less guilty about not letting him meet other dogs on our regular walks (he's an only dog).
 
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