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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm looking for a friendly and nice dog that is highly trainable. Please use your best judgements.

Requirements (In descending order from highest priority to lowest)

- Quit - I had to get rid of my Maltese b/c my neighbors complained.
- healthy
- Friendly - Can interact and make friends easily.
- Not too big - I live in an apartment. Huge dogs are inconvenient for me.
- Trainable - Don't want it to pee everywhere.
- Cute
Thanks. I'm very new to dogs.
 

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If you want a smaller dog, look into a Bichon Frise.

But a great starter dog is a 2- 5 year old Labrador Retriever adopted from a rescue.
1. You can ask the rescue for a partially trained, house trained adult.
2. If you walk him 30 min a day, once or twice a day, he'll adapt and sleep the rest of the day.
3. If you make a mistake... he will forgive you and forget it. Most dogs will, but Labs are tops for forgiveness.
4. Labs are the ultimate, friendly dog.
5. You can also get a Lab mix. My Lab-GSD is 60 lbs, sleeping on the corner of my bed, as I type this.
 

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If you "had to" get rid of a dog for any reason, what's changed now? If nothing has changed, I would suggest not getting another dog. They aren't disposable. Dogs make noise. They make messes. They get sick. If any of those things will make you get rid of your dog, it's best not to get one in the first place.
 

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You're not new to dogs. You had one and got rid of it. There are no breeds that are guaranteed to be quiet and perfectly trainable. You have to be willing to put in the effort. I'm not sure how I feel about you getting another dog after rehoming the first, but don't get a puppy. Puppies are loud, pee everywhere and chew everything. Get an adult mixed breed or purebred, doesn't matter, already proven to be quiet and mellow.
 

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- Quiet - I had to get rid of my Maltese b/c my neighbors complained.
- healthy
- Friendly - Can interact and make friends easily.
- Not too big - I live in an apartment. Huge dogs are inconvenient for me.
- Trainable - Don't want it to pee everywhere.
- Cute
I based on the selected words and phrases, I'm going to suggest you get a kitten, not another dog.

You got rid of a dog instead of working on it.
This will all boil down to the individual dog.
All dogs get sick. Yes there are some breeds out there healthier than others, but it's no guarantee you won't get a sick dog, just a warning.
"Inconvenient" is sort of a loaded word. It seems your last dog was inconvenient, and inconvenient is what lands dogs in shelters. :|
All breeds are trainable, you just have to do it right and put the effort in it.
This should really not even be a factor when choosing a dog. A dog could be perfect for you, but would get looked over because it's not exactly eye candy. With dogs, it really is all about what's inside.

You don't seem to be interested in grooming requirements, or energy levels, which would in turn lead to exercise requirements and these are a couple of really big things in a dog's life that can make or break the experience, especially exercise. A dog who doesn't get enough exercise can easily turn into a chewing, peeing, barking monster, and it's no one's fault but it's owner.


That being said, as I have suggested you get a kitten, I would suggest a Maine Coon or a Manx.
The Maine Coon is a large, intelligent, trainable, lovable breed that enjoys following their owners around and even going for leashed walks, should you get them used to the harness early on.
The Manx is typically a slender, very agile cat that loves to talk to it's family and follow them around. They have a dog-like nature and have been known to play fetch and go for walks. They are trainable and very clean. I personally know fetching Manx cats who will get their ball from it's place, bring it to you and retrieve it after you've thrown it. My last Manx was talkative and very clean and would actually clean the area around her bowl after she finished eating.

Just a suggestion.
 

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I agree with what HollowHeaven said. Maine Coons are wonderful cats with a lot of personality. As long as they're socialized well as kittens they'll become the friendly and sweet gentle giants that the breed is known for. Our 10 year old Maine Coon weighs in at 25lbs and still thinks he's a little lap kitten. He's aslo learning clicker tricks along with our Chihuahua puppy (he loves the training treats).

So far as dogs go, it's really up to the individual dog and how well it's trained. Our Chi pup has been surprisingly smart, given how low the breed is on intelligence charts. She was housebroken within the first week and she's learned about 10 tricks so far. She isn't loud or yappy. She's still a teething puppy and wants to chew on stuff but a good supply of chews and toys is keeping most of this in check. She's easily the second smartest dog I've ever owned (#1 being the border collie I had when I was a teenager).

Some breeds are more prone to barking. As you discovered, Maltese are one of these breeds. In fact, this causes them to be one of the most abandoned toy breeds. You'll want to avoid breeds that have this behavior naturally.

A Papillon or Toy Poodle might be a good fit for you. They're cute, usually quiet, and relatively smart dogs. However, I'd recommend carefully researching any breeder you consider. A well socialized puppy from a line of dogs that have the behaviors you want will most likely be a much better dog than one picked on looks alone. And, of course, you'll be responsible for the training and socialization of the dog.
 

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Some breeds are more prone to barking. As you discovered, Maltese are one of these breeds. In fact, this causes them to be one of the most abandoned toy breeds. You'll want to avoid breeds that have this behavior naturally.

A Papillon or Toy Poodle might be a good fit for you. They're cute, usually quiet, and relatively smart dogs. However, I'd recommend carefully researching any breeder you consider. A well socialized puppy from a line of dogs that have the behaviors you want will most likely be a much better dog than one picked on looks alone. And, of course, you'll be responsible for the training and socialization of the dog.
Poodles, including toys, are known for being good alert dogs, because they do bark -- sometimes a lot.

I'm sorry, but no breed is bark-free. I think it's irresponsible (in these circumstances) to encourage someone to get a dog based on breed stereotypes about them being generally quieter, because there are ALWAYS exceptions. And most dogs do bark. If someone got rid of a previous dog because of a neighbor complaining, I would say they're not a good candidate for a dog.
 

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A Papillon or Toy Poodle might be a good fit for you. They're cute, usually quiet, and relatively smart dogs. However, I'd recommend carefully researching any breeder you consider. A well socialized puppy from a line of dogs that have the behaviors you want will most likely be a much better dog than one picked on looks alone. And, of course, you'll be responsible for the training and socialization of the dog.
Papillons are NOT usually quiet. Many papillons are very vocal and are often not recommended for apartment living because of how vocal they are. Mine are very alert dogs and bark quite a bit but there's also the fact that a lot of papillons will excitement scream when they get riled up. Now I've had them in an apartment and they were fine, but they are definitely not a quiet breed.
 

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Quiet - all dogs can and will bark, some more than others, even within the breed there are quiet and noisy dogs. My first golden was very quiet. Storee earned her name, she doesn't get why people don't want to hear her thoughts!
Healthy - depends on the breed, the breeder (did they select for healthy dogs), diet, vet care (as in not over vaccinating), where the dog lives (if you clean with a ton of chemicals you can make the dog sick), and a good dose of luck.
Friendly - all pups are usually quite friendly, but it's up to the owner to keep socializing and make the pup used to new people as a good thing.
Not too big - depends on what you define as too big! Too big for me is over 90 lbs, for someone else it might be over 30 lbs, and for someone else it might be 120 lbs.
Trainable - dogs are only as good as their owners as far as how much time you take to train them, housebreaking too, though it does help if the pup was raised in a clean setting vs. allowed to pee wherever including carpets. Even then, you need to housebreak and do a lot of work.
Cute - otterhound puppies are really, really, really cute. Really. As in if they stayed that cute I'd consider getting one. But they fail almost every other request you have for a dog when they grow up into big, noisy, not as easy to train wire haired hounds. Go figure.

My advice is to eithe find a rescue that fits those requirements already or get a cat.
 

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Poodles, including toys, are known for being good alert dogs, because they do bark -- sometimes a lot.
The ones I've known haven't barked incessantly and haven't barked without a good reason. But, a lot of it is the individual dog and their training. If someone allows their dog to go nuts barking at the least little stimulation they'll have a problem regardless of breed.

I understand what you're saying about breed stereotypes. Every dog is an individual and shaped by their experiences and training. However, certain behaviors and tendencies are built into certain breeds and are more statistically likely to exhibit them. Extraordinarily high Maltese abandonment rates due to behavioral issues is one indicator of this.

As I noted, I'd recommend them get a cat rather than a dog given their history and situation.

Papillons are NOT usually quiet.
I was mainly thinking about Papillon a friend has. She doesn't go nuts when someone rings the doorbell or there's a noise outside but that may be due to training and individual disposition. Maybe one little alert bark but that's it.
 

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I'm not going to judge you for having to 'get rid of' your previous dog because i've been there. My partner and I had to rehome our previous dog Kobi because my partner became very, very ill for a long time and during the days we spent most of them at various hospitals. Obviously this wasn't fair on Kobi and we made the heartbreaking decision to rehome, now he is with a lovely lady who loves walks/hikes and he really gets the best out of life now.

I think though because I've had to have a much loved dog rehomed I can honestly say you need to think this through carefully. I mean this in the nicest way possible but I don't think you've really thought this through and got a great mindset. You want a friendly, sociable dog but you can't guarantee that it's something you have to actively work on. You want a trained dog that won't pee inside, with a puppy that takes work and again most likely with a shelter dog. Dogs/puppies are at times inconvenient and i'm not just talking about size, every time you go out you have factor in that you can't leave them too long in a crate, you might want to go out for the whole day somewhere and you have to check that dogs are allowed ect.

I second what others have said about taking into consideration the important things which isn't just how big the dog is or how cute. Energy levels, grooming requirements ect. As I said before my partner and I had to rehome Kobi and it was heartbreaking, my partner is now disabled and reliant upon a wheelchair. We live an isolated life, the most we see of people is when we have to go to the hospital, we wanted a dog for companionship ultimately we wanted an older dog but because of the wheelchair and extra adaptions around our home we decided a puppy would accept this easier. Not that i'm saying that decision was easy we agonised over it for weeks and we spent even longer researching breeds, training techniques because we did not want to have to rehome another dog. I'm pleased to say that Tori is turning out to be a very fine puppy and has brought a lot of joy into our lives, that's partly her personality and a big chunk of training and spending time with her.

I really hope that you consider all that everyone has said and that you honestly think about what owning a dog means. I also hope that you reflect on what it was like when you had to 'get rid of' your previous dog and that you are determined enough that if you get another dog and have difficulties you work on it with your dog. If you read all that's been said and even a part of you is saying I can't do that then please don't get a dog, get a cat. I can guarantee that most cats don't bark.
 

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I was mainly thinking about Papillon a friend has. She doesn't go nuts when someone rings the doorbell or there's a noise outside but that may be due to training and individual disposition. Maybe one little alert bark but that's it.
That is very unusual for a papillon. It happens but not often. Trust me, I've lived with 7 papillons and know dozens. One of our dogs is very laid back and rarely barks. The others all alert bark and my youngest is a big time barker and screamer. They tend to be very hyper-alert kinds of dogs. I wouldn't generalize a breed based on one individual. The OP really doesn't sound like the right kind of owner for a papillon. I think they'd be annoyed by a papillon fast. Honestly, I wouldn't recommend a dog at all, but definitely not a pap.
 

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I agree with Laurelin. I have a papillon, I have two different friends with three papillons each, and I know several breeders as well. Almost every papillon I've met has been at the very least a good watchdog (alert barking), and most of the dogs are pretty vocal in general. It's definitely not what I would consider a quiet breed.

OP, I'm with some of the others who have posted here -- I don't think a dog is right for you. However, if you have your heart set on one, get an adult that already has the qualities you want, because no breeder will be able to guarantee their pups will fit every requirement when they grow up. "Quiet" is more of an individual thing than a breed thing, in my experience.
 

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That is very unusual for a papillon. It happens but not often. Trust me, I've lived with 7 papillons and know dozens. One of our dogs is very laid back and rarely barks. The others all alert bark and my youngest is a big time barker and screamer. They tend to be very hyper-alert kinds of dogs. I wouldn't generalize a breed based on one individual. The OP really doesn't sound like the right kind of owner for a papillon. I think they'd be annoyed by a papillon fast. Honestly, I wouldn't recommend a dog at all, but definitely not a pap.
All you guys with paps I have to say they are so CUTE I can't stand it!!!! I love their smiles :).
 

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Kittens are fun, much quieter than dogs (even when they're loud), easy to entertain and don't take a lot of effort (and this is coming from a dog person).
 

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Kittens are fun, much quieter than dogs (even when they're loud), easy to entertain and don't take a lot of effort (and this is coming from a dog person).
Agree! Either move or get a cat or maybe a snake as a pet. sorry don't have much advice if you gave up on your dog... I have quiet dogs but would not live somewhere if it was unacceptable if they weren't.
 

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That is very unusual for a papillon. It happens but not often. Trust me, I've lived with 7 papillons and know dozens.
Thanks for the info. When we were looking for a dog recently we were considering a Papillon or a Bichon Frise based on what we had researched and from seeing actual dogs. Noise wasn't a big factor with us since we also have a blue and gold macaw.

Aside from the cuteness factor, the Papillon was of interest to us due to the intelligence that the breed is said to have. Our friend's dog's excellent behavior seemed to bear this out. Do you find this true or is this another stereotype I've fallen for?

Anyway, we ended up with a rescue Chi puppy (as seen in my avatar) who's been great.
 

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If you got rid of a dog just d/t barking (did you consider any alternative to "getting rid" of it?) I would not reccommend you go out and get another dog-- any breed can bark, and many dogs will have other issues that you may have not considered....
 

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The specifications you stated, I suddenly came an idea that cyberian huskies meets they requirements.
But there is a little problem. They are bit angry naturally and if you they get irritated from you, they won't
tolerate with even you. :p
The price is $550-600.
 

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The specifications you stated, I suddenly came an idea that cyberian huskies meets they requirements.
But there is a little problem. They are bit angry naturally and if you they get irritated from you, they won't
tolerate with even you. :p
The price is $550-600.
Siberian Huskies.

If there was ever a breed that is completely wrong for this person, it's them. They are LOUD, high energy, stubborn, independent, 'big', they shed like the hair will never stop, the list goes on.
They are not a "bit angry naturally". They are highly friendly and social, they just have their own idea of what to do.
 
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