Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody

This is my situation
5 month ago i rescue a dog (mix lab/rott ) , she was 6 month then .
She have been maltreated , first , the first owner cut her tails with scissors when she was 3 mont old .
She is really good , lovely , disciplined but remain this problem
she is more and more agressive with stranger especially those who try a direct contact !
She is just shy and elusive with dog's owner and most of women , and quickly lovely with women .
I ve try all method i know but nothing seems to work
ive try treats i give to people , put her in submissive position , walk in busy place
nothing change
did anyone have an advice to solve this ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,170 Posts
If you're scared of snakes, you don't start to cure the problem by going where there are loads of snakes and hope it gets better. Putting her in a "submissive position" and walking in places with a lot of people are not helping.

My suggestion. Take your dog to a place where there are no other people. Have a person start walking toward you. When the person is close enough for the dog to see the person but NOT close enough to react, you give her a treat. Even if the person is 50 yards or more away. Well done, good job. Person turns around and leaves; treats go away. Person returns, treats come back.

This is not a quick process. You are trying to change the way this girl thinks about people, and that takes time. Just keep reminding yourself that you don't overcome a fear of snakes overnight.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I understand your figure with the snake , but the paradoxal thing is that she is really good walking in public as far as nobody try to touch her....
And dont worry i know its a long process , but since 5 month i dont see progress on this instead of all the oter problem she had , i will continue the treat and wait....
I think she is still too much on the defensive...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Some dogs simply don't like being touched by people they don't know, and you shouldn't expect them to love to be pet. Your dog is not everyone's property so it is fine for you to say that she doesn't like being petted and please do not pet her.

You can teach her to accept petting without being aggressive (and exactly how aggressive are we talking? I had a dog that would gladly take a stranger's face off if someone approached him the wrong way) but you may never get her to like it if she is simply aloof by nature. The best way to do this would be to gradually reward her for someone getting closer and closer while staying calm, rewarding as she calmly accepts really light touches, progressing to rewarding for calmly allowing actual petting. Punishing her or putting her in a "submissive posture" only reinforces that she needs to be afraid of strangers trying to touch her because her owner goes crazy and tries to kill her (how she views being put in a submissive posture) so if she makes the strangers go away, maybe her owner won't go crazy. Depending on how aggressive she is, you may need professional help to work on this issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
I can't say I agree with "motivational correction" as a way to handle human aggression. I've seen first-hand how correcting a dog for growling at a person can lead to a dog biting the handler or the other person without warning. I was working with a highly recommended trainer. I simply refused to apply the level of "correction" to my dog to completely shut him down so he wouldn't bite anymore. Teaching him that strangers are fun and not dangerous worked way better than simply suppressing behavior I didn't like.

Obedience training.. definitely. A great class is beneficial to both the handler and the dog. You learn to work as a team and the leadership will fall into place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,193 Posts
Four years ago I adopted a dog from a rescue organization. Great Pup! My goals for her were to compete in dog sports and be a therapy dog. I did all of the socializing and training I was supposed to do. She is very, very scary smart. At about 8 or 9 months, she decided that she hated strangers touching her. She would sit and stay and do all of the things required of her, but she would duck her head when people tried to touch her. She would also pin her ears back in a pathetic way that said, "I hate you. Your hands are dirty. Don't touch me!" She would not growl or retreat, but she looked like she was being tortured. She flew through the TDI test with ease and grace. She adored the evaluator. She was in a human-loving mood the day of the test. However, I simply can't volunteer with her because it makes her unhappy. I also believe that when a dog has the grace to politely tell you that they don't like something, we should have the good sense to listen. If I were to ignore my dog's preference, she would start communicating it more loudly.

You are doing the right thing by socializing your dog, but having your dog like being touched by strangers may not be reasonable. If I was going to try to change this, I would have strangers (to the dog) toss treats to the floor for your dog but not touch her. When people come to visit, give them a cup of treats and have them drop them one at a time to the floor over the course of their visit. When your dog retrieves the treat, have the guest ignore her. If your dog decides that she wants to be touched, she will chose to approach your guests on her own as she feels safe enough. There really is no harm or risk to this method. If it doesn't work, nothing is lost. Forced contact risks a bite. It also risks increasing her axiety to a level that's hard to return from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,574 Posts
I have taken in several dogs that were like this and unfortuneately it is a long process. I try not to focus on that issue at all as I find that stressing over a situation makes it worse. Instead, I take a step back. I start at the beginning and take one step at a time. In other words, back to basic training with no focus on the other. Start by teaching sits, downs, heel on leash, come when called etc... All of this is when you are home alone with the dog. Make that bond with the dog first. Taking her for walks during this period is great but not in a place where people will stop to pet the dog. If someone does ask simply say. "no, she is in training right now" and move on. Teach your dog to do those basic commands around people that are not threatening to her. Then set up scenerios where the people basically ignore her while you are working but occasionaly gently toss a high value treat to her. They should never stand over her or look right at her.

When I had these types of dogs, I would have a bowl of boiled chicken or grilled steak bits at the door when people would come over. I would instruct them to come in, ignore the dog and drop a treat to the dog when she showed interest in them. My dogs got over most of their issues in this manner. I am not the best at describing what I do but hopefully you get the idea. Not all dogs are overly social so just allow her to set the pace and protect her from situations that are too much for her. Good job rescuing a dog, I bet she pays you back 10 fold.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top