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Hello, I can't seem to find anything related to this situation on the web, only things about bad roommates with problem dogs and roommates who neglect their animals so here goes...

I have a 6 month old husky mix. I believe my puppy is pretty well behaved and mild mannered based off my other current and past relationships with dogs. I know it's normal for puppies to chew and even dogs to chew especially if they are anxious, bored, and/or under-exercised.

I live with roommates and when I go to work I make sure my dog has water and that nothing is accessible to chew except his toys. I block him in the kitchen and that is the only room he has access to unless someone leaves a door open to their bedroom, bathroom or basement. My roommates know not to leave anything out and have had phone chargers and other small things chewed up and have learned from that.

I am the first and original tenant of this house out of everyone who lives here. I worked hard to find this house and move myself and all my past roommates with me from our old house to this one and I've lived here for 3 years. Half of my original roommates have moved out and I have had a few waves of different roommates with half of the original remaining. I do all the sweeping, mopping, organizing, cleaning, furniture finding, dishes buying, recycling sorting, garbage-to-the-curbing etc. I plan to live here until the house falls to the ground, I am renovicted, or my partner and I buy our own home. I am 8 years younger than the eldest roommate and 6 years older than the youngest roommate.

I have finally the money and found a used kennel big enough for my growing dog (he has a portable one he is outgrowing) so he is not in the kitchen while I am away at work (one of my roommates takes him outside while I'm away so he's not just stuck inside all day) that I am picking up tomorrow.

It is expected that he pee and poop in the kitchen while I'm not there and when I get home I clean it and since it is a problem for my roommates I keep him in my room at night.

I watch puppy training videos and train with him everyday and play fetch with him indoors as I don't often have time to go play at the park often. I believe I am doing my best to raise this dog and am trying to accommodate my roommates as much as possible.

Today the yougest of my roommates, who is also a good friend, left her brand new $100 jacket she just bought in a bag on the kitchen floor and left the room for an extended amount of time. It is well understood that no one is to leave anything they value in the kitchen alone with the dog. He may even try to nibble on a sweater you are wearing if you sit next to him. So, of course when she returned, the fluffy part of the collar was chewed.

My partner and I were at work and received a message from her telling us what happened. We both looked at each other and shook our heads and talked about how much that must suck for her, but did not reply to her message.

Some minutes later she writes again with attitude "So, thanks" demanding we pay for the jacket to which my partner replies that he and I would talk about it. She replied that we better not be thinking about not paying for the jacket. Both my partner and I agreed that she must be very angry so we would not reply and would wait until she got home to talk it over.

When we got home from work, and she was still at work we received an angry message from her attacking our character and the puppy's behaviour, calling us names, asking why we wouldn't own up, telling us we were going to pay for the damage by this weekend or she was taking it out of her rent.

Before the outburst via text my partner and I were talking about how we could approach the situation. We try our very best to control our dog's environment and we know what it costs in time and money when one commits to inviting a dog to become a part of your family. We certainly didn't think it was fair for us to pay for her mistake since she knows very well what happens when you leave your stuff unattended with the puppy but we didn't want to just brush it off as we could tell that she was upset about the situation. We even considered possibly paying for half after talking it over or letting her cool off a bit. After the message with the name calling (fair enough as my parter and I have had our share of outbursts over dog/roommate related incidents...) we were definitely reluctant to reimburse her at all in any way.

Again, my partner and I do all in our control to make sure nothing is damaged in the house and I am even constantly putting away my roommates stuff to avoid these sorts of terrible situations. She has also in the past told us we should keep our stuff in our room where he can't get at it, as that is what she does.

After the messages with the name calling my husband told her we would talk when she got home and she sent another message telling us we should re-home our puppy to someone suited to training him.

Again, I take time each day to training and watch dog training videos on everything puppy/dog a-z.

I know it sucks for this to happen to her and everything has been fine in the dog damage department for the past 4 months since we got him, plus we do everything in our control to prevent damage and messes in parts of the house other than the kitchen, but I think it is totally unfair to expect us to pay for her mistake.

She has refused to admit she is at fault claiming she was not careless and she should be able to put stuff down in her "own f***** house" and wants us to replace the jacket. She is clearly angry at herself and directing the costs and blame at something and someone easy to do so.

What should we do?

Hello, I can't seem to find anything related to this situation on the web, only things about bad roommates with problem dogs and roommates who neglect their animals so here goes...

I have a 6 month old husky mix. I believe my puppy is pretty well behaved and mild mannered based off my other current and past relationships with dogs. I know it's normal for puppies to chew and even dogs to chew especially if they are anxious, bored, and/or under-exercised.

I live with roommates and when I go to work I make sure my dog has water and that nothing is accessible to chew except his toys. I block him in the kitchen and that is the only room he has access to unless someone leaves a door open to their bedroom, bathroom or basement. My roommates know not to leave anything out and have had phone chargers and other small things chewed up and have learned from that.

I am the first and original tenant of this house out of everyone who lives here. I worked hard to find this house and move myself and all my past roommates with me from our old house to this one and I've lived here for 3 years. Half of my original roommates have moved out and I have had a few waves of different roommates with half of the original remaining. I do all the sweeping, mopping, organizing, cleaning, furniture finding, dishes buying, recycling sorting, garbage-to-the-curbing etc. I plan to live here until the house falls to the ground, I am renovicted, or my partner and I buy our own home. I am 8 years younger than the eldest roommate and 6 years older than the youngest roommate.

I have finally the money and found a used kennel big enough for my growing dog (he has a portable one he is outgrowing) so he is not in the kitchen while I am away at work (one of my roommates takes him outside while I'm away so he's not just stuck inside all day) that I am picking up tomorrow.

It is expected that he pee and poop in the kitchen while I'm not there and when I get home I clean it and since it is a problem for my roommates I keep him in my room at night.

I watch puppy training videos and train with him everyday and play fetch with him indoors as I don't often have time to go play at the park often. I believe I am doing my best to raise this dog and am trying to accommodate my roommates as much as possible.

Today the yougest of my roommates, who is also a good friend, left her brand new $100 jacket she just bought in a bag on the kitchen floor and left the room for an extended amount of time. It is well understood that no one is to leave anything they value in the kitchen alone with the dog. He may even try to nibble on a sweater you are wearing if you sit next to him. So, of course when she returned, the fluffy part of the collar was chewed.

My partner and I were at work and received a message from her telling us what happened. We both looked at each other and shook our heads and talked about how much that must suck for her, but did not reply to her message.

Some minutes later she writes again with attitude "So, thanks" demanding we pay for the jacket to which my partner replies that he and I would talk about it. She replied that we better not be thinking about not paying for the jacket. Both my partner and I agreed that she must be very angry so we would not reply and would wait until she got home to talk it over.

When we got home from work, and she was still at work we received an angry message from her attacking our character and the puppy's behaviour, calling us names, asking why we wouldn't own up, telling us we were going to pay for the damage by this weekend or she was taking it out of her rent.

Before the outburst via text my partner and I were talking about how we could approach the situation. We try our very best to control our dog's environment and we know what it costs in time and money when one commits to inviting a dog to become a part of your family. We certainly didn't think it was fair for us to pay for her mistake since she knows very well what happens when you leave your stuff unattended with the puppy but we didn't want to just brush it off as we could tell that she was upset about the situation. We even considered possibly paying for half after talking it over or letting her cool off a bit. After the message with the name calling (fair enough as my parter and I have had our share of outbursts over dog/roommate related incidents...) we were definitely reluctant to reimburse her at all in any way.

Again, my partner and I do all in our control to make sure nothing is damaged in the house and I am even constantly putting away my roommates stuff to avoid these sorts of terrible situations. She has also in the past told us we should keep our stuff in our room where he can't get at it, as that is what she does.

After the messages with the name calling my husband told her we would talk when she got home and she sent another message telling us we should re-home our puppy to someone suited to training him.

Again, I take time each day to training and watch dog training videos on everything puppy/dog a-z.

I know it sucks for this to happen to her and everything has been fine in the dog damage department for the past 4 months since we got him, plus we do everything in our control to prevent damage and messes in parts of the house other than the kitchen, but I think it is totally unfair to expect us to pay for her mistake.

She has refused to admit she is at fault claiming she was not careless and she should be able to put stuff down in her "own f***** house" and wants us to replace the jacket. She is clearly angry at herself and directing the costs and blame at something and someone easy to do so.

What should we do?

Edit: She came home and called a meeting. She has refuted that we are good friends (I didn't mention I thought we were, I just thought we were since we hang out one on one and I pick her up from work sometimes and I hang out with her all the time, we watch movies, shop, go to concerts, i give her guest list to events, and we have brunch together...) but if we were she would have approached the situation differently (I find it strange that she thinks someone who is not a friend deserves that sort of treatment). She thinks no matter what, like someone who has children, expensive items should be replaced without question. I disagree, as anyone could leave a crystal glass even on purpose and demand payment even though as an adult you should be aware of children and animals. Anyhow, we are going to pay for tailoring as the damage is very minimal and repairs will not be noticeable. She defended her words as defending her mom who paid for the jacket (she thought we were jerking her around and thus putting her mom out all that money) and that past roommates ("friends"/disrespectful/loud/messy roommates) who talk trash about living with us swayed her into believing we were unreasonable people. She also kept telling us that if we were training him properly that he should know better by now what is right and wrong and wouldn't have touched her jacket. Obviously I told her that is not true and he is only 6 months old and puppies do know right from wrong by this time but will push their boundaries (especially if something is on the floor that has real fur and looks like it may be a toy)! She tried to blame the incident on us being away all day (it was only an hour and a half since we had left) and then on us not exercising him before hand (my partner took him for a big run around the neighbourhood before we left). The whole thing seemed like just like she was trying to defend herself without actually apologizing to us all the while still letting little jabs slip into the conversation. All is okay now basically, though I'm still curious as to what you would have done and other things I could do that I haven't done yet. (We send him to dog boarding for some real fun and training on really busy days/just purchased an extra tall dog door and collapsible kennel/play fetch indoors when time constrained/have my other roommate take him out when we are out/take him to the park with friends and dog friends/are going to have him neutered soon/he plays with the kitten, too/im going to start taking him swimming/he has toys of all different shapes and textures) I don't believe there is much a problem with her though she doesn't seem to understand dogs, this is the first time I have ever had an issue with her and she is actually one of the best roommates I've ever had, though she seems a bit bossy.
 

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If it were me, I would replace the jacket. Yes, you have to keep tempting chewable items away from puppies and young dogs- I lost about 3 pairs of shoes to my dog Fergus. However, the dog is not hers, and it isn't realistic to expect your roomates to follow the "dog rules" as closely as you and your partner would. I like to keep the peace in my life, so I would just replace the jacket, especially if she is otherwise a good roomate.
 

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If it were me, I would replace the jacket. Yes, you have to keep tempting chewable items away from puppies and young dogs- I lost about 3 pairs of shoes to my dog Fergus. However, the dog is not hers, and it isn't realistic to expect your roomates to follow the "dog rules" as closely as you and your partner would. I like to keep the peace in my life, so I would just replace the jacket, especially if she is otherwise a good roomate.
Yup. I would do this.

And then I would tell them that next time not to leave the jacket there because it will happen again.
 

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I would replace it, as well.

Kitchens are shared space and really, she should be able to set her stuff down for a bit in a shared area and not have to worry about it being chewed up. Should she have been more careful knowing that there's a dog there that might chew? Sure. But really the responsibility is on you as it's your dog that you're leaving in shared space. So kudos on getting a crate and be sure to keep the dog out of shared spaces from now on unless supervised. But for this instance, just pay for the jacket and move on.
 

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If it were me, I would replace the jacket. Yes, you have to keep tempting chewable items away from puppies and young dogs- I lost about 3 pairs of shoes to my dog Fergus. However, the dog is not hers, and it isn't realistic to expect your roomates to follow the "dog rules" as closely as you and your partner would. I like to keep the peace in my life, so I would just replace the jacket, especially if she is otherwise a good roomate.
Agreed. I would replace the jacket, or pay for a repair, but with a clause along the lines of "we will fix this, everyone makes mistakes, we feel badly, but let us all learn a lesson from this situation and not leave anything within the puppy's reach, anything else that gets destroyed is the responsibility of the person who left it there". Something along those lines.

Also, this isn't your direct question, but I can see why your roommate is perhaps slightly frustrated and this something you should perhaps take into account. Having a 6 month old puppy without a kennel confined to the kitchen with all of the household doors shut is a big inconvenience to your roommate(s). If I had a roommate who told me they were getting a puppy and weren't getting a crate, I'd tell them to get both or get neither.

Also, if he's 6 months old, why is it expected that he pee/poop in the kitchen while you are gone? Beyond being fairly disgusting (animals shouldn't regularly eliminate in an area in which you cook, in my opinion), this also means that your roommate(s) need to either clean up after the puppy to cook, or they can't use the kitchen until you get home.

Since your roommate brought up exercise, and you say you play indoor fetch with the puppy - a few minutes of indoor fetch isn't long enough to tire out a 6 month old Husky. If you don't have one, I believe you and your partner need to come up with an exercise routine. A Husky puppy has a lot of energy. His destructive chewing will worsen if he becomes bored and frustrated with a lack of physical and mental stimulation.

So, while it sounds like your roommate reacted with anger and name-calling when her jacket was ruined, based on your post, I am not surprised tensions of this nature are brewing. Having a puppy and not having a crate it will fit into to aid in potty training and to halt destructive chewing is a sign of unpreparedness and a surefire way to make your roommates think you're a poor puppy owner.

I am not trying to come down hard on you, but I have the unpleasant experience of living with someone who allowed their dog to defecate in the house and said "I'll clean it up later", who hardly trained or walked her dog and whose dog destroyed my things because she wouldn't crate it, and it was miserable. Living with roommates requires respect and care and it sounds like your current puppy situation is very disrespectful to your roommates.
 

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nope... would not of paid for the jacket.... "sorry" We live in a world today that "everyone """" ELSE" is at fault instead of themselves.....
 

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Honestly, given that the roommate left the jacket on the floor for an extended amount of time, I personally wouldn't pay, or not more than 50%. It would be one thing if she only left it for a few minutes, but leaving an item on the floor unattended around a puppy for an extended amount of time is just asking to have it chewed up. Add to that her behaviour, and I wouldn't be paying the full price of the jacket.
 

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I would not pay for the jacket. She is an adult human, capable of knowing the rules. If the dog had free reign of the house, i'd feel a little bad but it is just one room that things can't be left in.
 

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I wouldn't pay for the jacket either. Especially if she was being rude about it. My roommate had her dogs confined to our kitchen before we got a crate for the puppy and I knew better than to be careless with my things in that area. She could have hurt the dog too, he could have ingested something and had a blockage or worse.

In this case since there is an issue that could make living there uncomfortable for everyone, I agree with kumas mom and wouldn't pay for more than half.

Getting a crate at this time is the best thing that could have happened. I hope things become less tense.
 

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Ya. I wouldn't pay. I mean I'm assuming you come to agreement that the pup would be left in kitchen, the shared space. And, be an adult and don't leave your crap all over the floor where a puppy can get to it. You knew he was there and chewed and threw your expensive, so important jacket on the floor anyways?? Ya right, get out if here woth that. Also, the name calling and threatening to rehome the puppy is uncalled for and just a jerk move.
 

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Wow, I gotta say that some of you folks, including the OP, seem to be selfish and have blinders on. You have a shared housing situation where a puppy is chewing on others clothing. But that is supposed to be alright because supposedly they all agreed, and the OP is the (self described) janitor, purchasing agent and manager of the home. Add to this the fact that the dog is allowed to poop in the kitchen. The fact is that the house is for people, and to expect special treatment when the property of the OP (puppy) destroys property of another (the coat) is selfish. People shouldn't have to readjust their life because of your dog, whether it be watching where they put their coat or where they step in the kitchen.

I don't think the OP should be living in a shared community, because the others are growing tired of sharing their space with not their puppy.

The OP needs to pay for the coat and take responsibility for their dog.
 

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I think I would just pay for the repairs if it can be repaired, or replace the jacket, just to keep the peace. It should have been made very clear before this happened that if anything in the kitchen was ruined, the owner of it would be responsible. Great idea to get a crate and train the dog to be in it as he should not be still pooping in the kitchen at his age.
 

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I would pay for the jacket.

Fact of the matter is, you're expecting a lot from your roommates. If this was something that had happened with the dog being in a crate or what have you, (ie: she left the jacket on top of a wire crate) fine, that's her mistake, but it's the kitchen. The kitchen is public space and their rent pays for them to be able to use it equally. You're keeping your dog in it. Not only are you keeping your dog in it, you are expecting him to pee and poop in the kitchen and for them to leave it there all day for you to clean it up. That isn't, IMO, very considerate to them.

The kennel will help going forward but for me ... no. I think the roommate is behaving badly, but I think she's also frustrated by the repeated lack of responses from you guys, too. A simple 'we'll talk when we get home' would have done a lot to diffuse the situation. As would pointing out that you'll get him out of the kitchen as of tomorrow and you're sorry.

She wasn't right exactly (puppies DO chew) but honestly? Shared space. The KITCHEN. That she is paying to use as much as you are (and it's her home no matter who has been there longest or plans to stay there longest). That she can't put things down in and that is expected to, for an entire work day, have pee and poop in it.

That's just expecting too much from her. It's not her puppy. You ARE liable for damages he causes.

Pay for the coat. Then get him out of that kitchen and crate him in your OWN room.

(Also yes, at 6 months old dog should be able to hold it for the length of a standard workday).
 

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I would pay to have the jacket repaired, but only the one time.

I'm curious - did you already have the puppy when your roommate moved in or did you get the puppy afterward?
 

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Sorry, but I wouldn't pay for it. Maybe I'd pay for part, if it was brought up in an adult manner. But it sounds like it has been agreed that the puppy would be kept in the kitchen. So any intelligent person would know not to throw their things on the floor where the puppy can get to them. You have a room for that. To me it sound like this is more the OP's house, and the other live there and help to pay. In the end, do what you feel is right, but don't let anyone bully you into doing something you don't want to.
 

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Tough situation but I think it depends on the verbal and/or written agreements you and your roommates made before they moved in. I agree with CptJack in that it doesn't matter who was in the house first, who does more chores, who intends on staying longer, etc... When people split the rent of a property it is THEIR home. The kitchen is as much theirs as it is yours. UNLESS something different was agreed upon and is (most likely) reflected in who pays a larger/smaller portion of the rent for different rights to areas of a shared home. Sure you laid down dog rules but if they were tacked on as problems happened or after the roommates moved in, that would be asking a lot for them to abide by. I think this situation is muddy and I think what your roommate said out of frustration was unwarranted. But the bottom line is someone else's property was damaged by your dog and it would be decent of you to do something about it. I think offering to send it in for repairs is a fair compromise if your roommate accepts that.

This is the only situation I can think of that would render you free of blame: If *while discussing the terms of agreement with a potential renter before she signs the lease or agrees to live in the same house* you very clearly designate the kitchen as your dog's area, and make clear your dog's behaviors such as destroying items left in his area. Basically, "This area of the house is more mine than yours and you shouldn't leave your stuff here," whether you say it that way or not. And if you have it in writing. And this person agrees to move in under those terms. Honestly, I don't know if you can legally hold someone to something like that even in writing, because you don't own this house. But otherwise, as others have stated... It is assumed when people share a house, the common areas are shared equally...
 

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If she knows that puppies chew things then it's her fault that she left her jacket on the floor, if you pay anything I would only pay for repairs. If she expects you to pay the whole thing she's crazy and she's probably more mad at herself for not being very smart.
 

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I would pay for the repairs or replacement. Her response was not good but she probably has ongoing frustration over issues related to the dog & this put her over the edge.

The roommates may have not really felt they had an option to say they did not want a dog in the house. Or even if they didn't mind initially, I know I would be frustrated that the dog is still using the kitchen as a bathroom after 4 months. And even if you say they can wait for you to clean it up, it smells & could be a safety hazard (slipping on urine, having to step around waste) so they can't cook unless they clean up or wait for you to get home.

Have you gone to an actual training class? Or just watched online videos & done training at home? If no in person class, I think taking your dog to an actual class might help your roommate relations, if for no reason but to show that you are attempting to train the dog. Right now, they probably feel your dog is not making enough progress with home training.

Also, if you do not already have them, look for a treat dispensing toy. You can put the dog's kibble in the toy & he will have to work to get it out. It will expel a lot more mental energy than eating a bowl of kibble & you don't need to be actively involved. Making sure your dog has enough physical & mental energy used everyday will help with some issues.
 

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Who leaves a jacket with a fluffy collar alone with a 6 month old husky? No, I wouldn't pay for it.

If she doesn't like the arrangements in general then she needs to talk about it like a grown up. But it sounds like she agreed to certain things wrt the dog and it's her own fault if she carelessly ignored them.
 
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