Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I hope someone can help, here goes... I live with my boyfriend and 2 kids aged 8 & 2, both excellent with animals, yes even the 2 year old!!

We are looking into getting a dog and as we havent had one before (he has with his parents) i want to get as much information as I can.

The main question is what type of dog would be best, we live in a 3 bed semi with garden, not big enoug for a large dog but definately big enough for something, I work part time the other half works full time. We live near lots of fields so plenty of walking space.

I would love a dog for the whole family to enjoy and one that wll happily play catch etc!! ie i dont need to worry about letting it off the lead.

Also age is an issue, is an older dog or younger dog better?

I just need some ideas on what breeds I should go for.

Thanks

Emma
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
How about a young adult mix breed? I'm thinking boxer mix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,423 Posts
How much time (or money) do you have for grooming? Is shedding (allergies) a concern? Do you want a high enegry dog that you can walk 15 miles a day with, a couch potato or something inbetween? Any plans to eventually do hunting, herding, tracking or Agility either for the kids or yourself?
Do you prefer an independent dog...one that would rather not be petted, not follow you around or do you like having a shadow? Do you want a dog that will bring you all the rodents and rabbits or one that is just content to be petted at your side?
Your choice will have alot to do with your lifestyle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hi thanks for the replies, we had seen a boxer, dalmation mix, not been to see it yet though. due to having 2 kids I dont have loads of time on my hands for grooming and would prefer one that doesnt shed to much, but not a big concern though. I like the idea of a dog quite happy with lounging around bu will also be up for some outdoor fun. This wll purely be a family pet no plans for him/her.

I would like a loving dog but not one that is constantly needing my attention.

Hope that gives more of an idea
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,574 Posts
That sounds like most of the dogs at my local shelter right now.

I can probably tell you to steer clear of dogs with an intense desire for a job...German Shepherds, Border Collies, Siberian Huskies, Malamutes...but otherwise it seems like your situation might be appropriate for any number of breeds or mutts.

You haven't been very clear on the level of energy you'd like the dog to have, though, which could seriously impact your choice. When you say you want a dog that will lounge around, are you talking all day? Are you planning on daily walks? How many? How long?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
[

You haven't been very clear on the level of energy you'd like the dog to have, though, which could seriously impact your choice. When you say you want a dog that will lounge around, are you talking all day? Are you planning on daily walks? How many? How long?[/QUOTE]

No definately not all day plan is to take him out before going to work for a shorter walk but then go out for a while in the evening, 1-2 hrs, but if I dont get the chance to take him out in the morning forany reason the dog wouldnt suffer, if that is possible?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
Hi....I would think that adopting a pet would be the best way for you to go --- go to Petfinder.com and research there stories -- you can get a feel that way about their personality.

As far as breed goes -- mixed breeds are great -- but you're never sure what they are mixed with.

A larger dog that sounds like a good fit for your family would be a Lab -- or a medium size dog would be a Beagle -- both dogs are easy to house and good with children.

There are so many --- if you have time - check out the website.

Good Luck! :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
363 Posts
No definately not all day plan is to take him out before going to work for a shorter walk but then go out for a while in the evening, 1-2 hrs, but if I dont get the chance to take him out in the morning forany reason the dog wouldnt suffer, if that is possible?
If your going for a short walk each morning and 1-2 hours each night and you keep that up .....well I think you are doing better than 90% of dog owners out there.

Get an 8 wk old lab pup. English style are maybe better for you (a little smaller, a little lower energy). IMHO the perfect personalities for families with children. Trainable, low reactivity, low in aggression but also rugged and fun. Yard size is not an issue, as long as he's getting lots of exercise. Lots of other options of course but don't ignore larger breed because of your yard size - its the amount of exercise not the square yardage that counts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
If you are looking at a shelter or rescue option I would suggest reading

Successful dog adoption by Sue sternberg (might be at your local library)
http://www.amazon.com/Successful-Dog-Adoption-Sue-Sternberg/dp/0764538934

This book goes over everything you need for chooseing a shelter dog based on your family and needs and goes into temperament energy levels how to interperet body language and a total guideline for evalueing a new member.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,997 Posts
If your going for a short walk each morning and 1-2 hours each night and you keep that up .....well I think you are doing better than 90% of dog owners out there.

Get an 8 wk old lab pup. English style are maybe better for you (a little smaller, a little lower energy). IMHO the perfect personalities for families with children. Trainable, low reactivity, low in aggression but also rugged and fun. Yard size is not an issue, as long as he's getting lots of exercise. Lots of other options of course but don't ignore larger breed because of your yard size - its the amount of exercise not the square yardage that counts.
I agree that a walk for 1-2 hours is fine for most breeds and definitely puts you ahead of the game.

I would not recommend a puppy for a first time owner. I really, really would not. I know other people on here will disagree with me most vehemently though on that topic and that's fine. I just feel that puppies are a ton of work and are a blank slate that will reflect any and every mistake for a long time.

I would recommend a young adult dog. You can get one from the shelter that is already semi-housebroken, and somewhat trained. Plus, you get a pretty good idea what kind of personality you're dealing with. Sometimes puppies personalities change completely as they get older.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
it's really a personal decision but i would focus on a dog in the 30-75lb range either pure bred, or a mix. whatever you decide research the breed fully. look for single coated breeds.
dals are not appropriate for children

my first impression for you was a nova scotia duck tolling retriever as they are about 45lbs (double coated so seasonal shedding :( ) but fluffy and soft for a toddler to grab onto, yet very tolerant of kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
Puppies are a lot of work... they need to be supervised almost constantly, they have to be taken out to pee or poop every two or three hours. If you work outside the home or the puppy will be left alone for extended periods of time, I would recommend a 1 or 2 year old dog instead.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
363 Posts
H&H ....curious why only single coated breeds?

re: puppies vs adult dogs - this is always a huge debate. Yes puppies require some extra time and patience. But consider i) perfect bonding ii) starting with a blank slate with no problems iii) most important of all: raising a puppy is a terrific terrific experience not to be missed. I whole hardheartedly, without reservation, recommend serious people getting their first dog to get an 8 wk old pup. A lot of people will recommend rescues as a way of "saving" a dog, avoiding overpopulation etc, which is all fine, but if we are just talking about you and your needs, seriously, get a pup the extra bit of work is 1,000 times worth it! [This assumes you are a serious person who is taking the responsibility of dog ownership seriously and not buying a dog on a whim; if you are then ....well then a rescue is a better idea].
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
my suggestion would be a lab hands down, they are wonderful family dogs, lovable loyal, protective of family and LOVE kids, they are tolerant of just about everything, and are very very versitile with lifestyles, from active to just plan lazy. just ask my tunder butt, he is very very active but can be a freaking lazy butt given the chance.

shedding is not too bad, and size is pretty good, thunder weighs about 78lbs, and he is a decent size.. below is a pic of the big lush and his side kick cinni.

what ever you choose, good luck, just be sure to do alot of research before bringing a pup home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
wow only just got back the pc, thanks for all your advice it really has helped, going to be doing a lot more researching before getting a dog so i know the one we get is the right one for us, thanks again Emma
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Hi, there! I just want to re-iterate about the two-year-old getting knocked over. I understand your desire for a dog, I truly do. I love pets myself, and know that even with my own human child I long for a "fur baby" too.

We had a dog already when my son was born. Teddy was about four at that time. He is a border collie - husky mix and a very gentle, sweet dog who doesn't need a ton of exercise (although we try to give it to him anyway) so don't believe everything you hear about breed characteristics. It really depends a lot on the individual dog. (Two walks a day (10-30) minutes were typical when we first adopted him - morning and evening. Later, though, he was lucky to get a walk every day when we were busy, ill, or the weather was bad.)

Anyway, Teddy was protective of the baby and wonderful with him. He also basically ignored him, because he had bonded with us and considered the newcomer beneath his notice.

Now that my son is seven, we got a beagle/dachsund mix - aka "doxle" (what a silly name!) Anyway, this young dog from the pound is delightful, friendly, playful, not a big barker, and has spurts of energy followed by very long naps. He sleeps most of the day, actually, or is fine tied up outside watching birds. His hair is short and hardly sheds at all in comparison to the husky/collie. I would recommend a dog like this to you. He is sweet, intelligent, responsive, and LOVES to play fetch!

HOWEVER... He jumps on my son all the time, trying to lick him, has inadvertently scratched him, and has even knocked my 65-lb boy over a couple of times. I'm very concerned that your two-year-old would be soon feeling harassed by a new dog trying to make friends with him/her, and perhaps inadvertently scratching or nipping in the process. He's about 25 lbs. Our friends have a Boston Terrier pup which is much smaller, and still jumps, scratches and licks. My son avoids him when at their house.

And you can't explain to the child how to stop the behavior, or that the dog is trying to be friendly, at that age. The child *might* end up hating or even fearing the dog.

Another issue is toys - a young dog will likely pick up every toy your child has around, chew up the favorite blanket or stuffed animal (because it has the child's scent), make splinters of those expensive wooden Thomas engines, etc. Young children's things are all on the floor - where the dog is, too. Food is another issue - the dog constantly trying to get things from the child's hands which are also close to the ground, or jumping up and taking food from the high chair.

All in all, I would like to gently encourage you to wait until your child is older - at least four or five - to introduce a new pet. I think the stress of trying to deal with a toddler and a new dog at the same time could quickly drive you to distraction.

If you do get a dog, though, I definitely recommend one that is about a year old. Both of our dogs were that age when we adopted them, and not having to housebreak or do all that "puppy" stuff is such a relief! There is certainly some training involved, and I'm still losing sleep over the new dog waking and whining in the crate at night, but nothing near what I would go through with a puppy. Just screen the dog you adopt very carefully for temperament. Perhaps we've just been very fortunate, though.

Just my two cents! Best of luck, whatever you decide!

i wouldnt consider it a mandatory trait but single coated breeds tend to shed less than double and require less brushing (better for a busy family)
a furminator fixes all of the above, at least in my house
Yes, our husky mix has a double coat, and that fine, fluffy undercoat gets everywhere when he is shedding, which is roughly half the year! It makes little "clouds" around the feet of the furniture, and clings like cat hair to our clothing. We don't dress nicely to go out until just before we walk out the door, and always have sticky lint brushes in our cars!

PS I apologize for being so long, but I hope it was helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,284 Posts
I say a 3-4 year old dog already proven to be okay with children. Maybe a breeder rehome if it's a Lab? Definitely don't recommend a lab puppy or a puppy at all right now for you (you've got kids to take care of and training a puppy is hard).

I think a mutty-mutt from the shelter would suit you just fine. Hound mixes come to mind.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
363 Posts
I say a 3-4 year old dog already proven to be okay with children. Maybe a breeder rehome if it's a Lab? Definitely don't recommend a lab puppy or a puppy at all right now for you (you've got kids to take care of and training a puppy is hard).

I think a mutty-mutt from the shelter would suit you just fine. Hound mixes come to mind.
Well, who are you going to trust more with your kids - an adult dog from a shelter with for the most part an unknown and maybe troubled history or a pup you've raised yourself and who has bonded with your kids from Day One ? Yeah a pup is a bit more work, but dogs do take a lot of time and work. If you are going to make the commitment then do it right and get the full benefit.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top