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My dog will only walk on my left side, as she was trained to do. That is really awkward in crowds. I suppose a dog could be trained to heel on the right, but then she would be on the wrong side for walking on streets.

Is it practical to teach a dog to heel on either side? Well, not necessarily heel, as I rarely have her heel, but walk. Would you use different command for the right and left, or what?
 

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I think it's a good idea to teach a dog to walk on either side of you. It's just easier to maneuver around crowds, if there's a ditch, something gross on the road, etc. I would use a different command like "Side" for your right side walking. This way it'll clear up any confusion and make it easier for the dog to understand which side you want her on. You can switch her from "heel" to "side" as much as you need to. And there is always loose leash walking, where the dog can navigate on its own if the side it is walking on has an obstruction and so forth as long as its loose leash and close to you.
 

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All of my dogs are comfortable walking on both sides. They walk with a loose leash and are at ease on the left or right.

I teach my dogs a formal, competitive "heel" as well. I only practice that on the left side. On the right, the dog does not have to watch me every stride and if I stop, while he does have to sit, I don't really care if it's precise and square.
 

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I think it's very practical. Sometimes you need your dog on one side or the other. I had trained mine mainly on one side as a puppy but as we got into agility at ~9 months old she had to be comfortable working with me on either side. It's never too late to start working on both sides.
 

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My dog will only walk on my left side, as she was trained to do. That is really awkward in crowds. I suppose a dog could be trained to heel on the right, but then she would be on the wrong side for walking on streets.

Is it practical to teach a dog to heel on either side? Well, not necessarily heel, as I rarely have her heel, but walk. Would you use different command for the right and left, or what?
If you are doing this on-leash, with your dog walking on either side of you, it is called Loose-Leash Walking (LLW). LLW is very important for walking with your dog in public and also for therapy dog work, among other situations. IMHO, it is not only practical, it should be part of every dog's socialization. So you are on the right track in wanting to do it.

Just to keep things straight, as trainingjunkie said, we usually reserve "heeling" for the obedience exercises in the strict heel position, which is always on the left side and is can be on or off leash. "Freestyle heeling" - pert of canine freestyle - is done on both the left and right side, but that is pretty advanced training and I think beyond what you are getting at.

If you teach LLW correctly, you don't need any verbal commands - the leash position is the only 'signal'. But you can teach a verbal if you want. if you do use a verbal, you SHOULD have one for the left side and different one for the right side.

Do a search over the forums or on the net for "loose leash walking" and you will find a lot of suggestions on how to teach this.

One suggestion is to start with free shaping off leash - in a safe area of course - and reward the dog every time he come close to you - close being what you define it. Sounds paradoxical, but it is actually good foundation work and is effective even with 'difficult' dogs.
 

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"Freestyle heeling" - pert of canine freestyle - is done on both the left and right side, but that is pretty advanced training and I think beyond what you are getting at.
Freestyle actually has four positions - left, right, front and back. I think it is good to teach the dog to be comfortable on either side. In addition to freestyle, herding and agility require a dog who is comfortable on either side. I found out the practical use many years ago, when we ran out of gas on the way back from a show (first big gas shortage) and my obedience dog insisted that the only place she could walk was on my left - next to traffic. I do use different cues.
 
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