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Discussion Starter #1
Today was the first time that our puppy saw the temperature in 80s (in Atlanta) and it completely sapped her. I know dogs feel heat more intensely than humans but she seemed to feel it extremely. She lay inside the house (no sun), panting in shallow breaths the ENTIRE day. when i touched her stomach it was burning and i actually had to wipe her coat with a cool wet towel. She doesnt have very long hair either. she didnt drink much water either.

A couple of weeks back we had taken her to the doggie park on a warmish sunny day, and there she hid under a rock, lying in the wet mud all the time and refused to come out while all other dogs were playing in the Sun.

Is it normal behavior and we are being overprotective or do we need to take her to a vet for a checkup? btw she is a mutt and is supposed to be a lab mix..with maybe some border collie in her.
 

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I would take her to the vet just to be on the safe side. Ilya pants a lot and very quickly when he's too hot. (he also has some issues from having heartworms in the past) If she has dark fur, I would imagine the color absorbs more heat(?)
 

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Our dog - shepherd/husky mix - doesn't tolerate heat well, either. When it's warm, she finds the coolest floor surface to lay on and stays put most of the day panting & sleeping. Her appetite goes down and she drinks more water. We have a kiddie pool we fill with water so she can splash around in it. And we give her ice cubes and watermelon, which she loves. When the sun goes down she perks right up and eats and wants to play all evening.

It's hard to tell if you have a problem without more info. Does your dog normally play with the other dogs at the parK, just not on warm days? Not drinking water is a concern. Might be worth a chat with the vet, esp. if the dog doesn't recover pretty quickly when the temperature cools.
 

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Val was panting and it was hot and steamy here in south jersey. It was 90 degrees and we had to turn on the air conditioning. Val was loads more comfortable with the a.c. not to mention his family was loads more comfortable.

We usually don't have to turn on the a.c. this early in the season, but it's more like the fourth of July than the end of April, that's for sure.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
winniec777: Bessie, our puppy, is very friendly and loves playing with other dogs generally. Though she is very playful at her puppy day care and with the neighborhood dogs, after her first exhausting experience at the doggie park we have not taken her there. perhaps we will try someday when its cooler and see her reaction.

ValtheAussie: we've turned on the airconditioning for Bessie too..though we wouldnt have switched it so soon for ourselves :)
 

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winniec777: Bessie, our puppy, is very friendly and loves playing with other dogs generally. Though she is very playful at her puppy day care and with the neighborhood dogs, after her first exhausting experience at the doggie park we have not taken her there. perhaps we will try someday when its cooler and see her reaction.

ValtheAussie: we've turned on the airconditioning for Bessie too..though we wouldnt have switched it so soon for ourselves :)

Val went to puppy class today and did fine, but he's off his food right now....it's so warm outside my automobile registered 94 degrees!!! Dang, it's only April.
 

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I like, if I have a dog that is susceptible to heat exhaustion/stroke etc to carry couple milk gallons of water in rig. When dog is in distress you wet back of neck, chest belly areas, back of front paws and in extreme cases an enema which helps cool off insides of dog. I was told this many years ago by Vet. I have never had to use the enema application and I would ask your Vet as to whether the enema would help in extreme case where you can't get to a Vet etc, as sometimes there are upgrades on things. The rest of instructions though are 100% correct and can be used with safety. Heatstrokes are very sneaky your dog is ok until he's not ok. Some dogs will never have any heat problems and some will and all the variables in between.
 

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wvasko: that sounds like a v good idea for while going out with the dog in the summers. however as u said will have to ask vet about the enema since i have no clue how to give one.
 

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wvasko: that sounds like a v good idea for while going out with the dog in the summers. however as u said will have to ask vet about the enema since i have no clue how to give one.
Well you would need a rubber syringe type similar to what they sell to clean ears of wax to squirt water up the butt. Or something a woman would use that shall remain nameless. I thank my lucky stars that I never had to try it. This is something that you would only use in extreme cases anyway. The ideal setup is a tub or kid's pool to actually lay dog in water, This could be difficult to haul around if you had a St Bernard type dog.

The best program is preventative measures anyway, hot weather very bad for a dog that you have no control over, that's the type that would not listen and run themselves into a heatstroke condition. This is also why a dog park could be a problem in heat with dogs chasing each other.
 

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We hibernate during the summer. Even getting up before sunrise does little to help with the heat. If it's 55°F or warmer when we start out, I have to soak the dogs down before doing anything outside. Maybe Bessie is more sensitive to heat than a "typical" dog, I just can't imagine taking my dogs anywhere outside once it's upper 60's. But on those occasions when I must take them out in heat, we take about 10 gallons of water along and a small lunch cooler full of ice to chew on. ¿Have I mentioned that I hate warm weather?
 

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I don't recall my other Aussie being very sensitive to the heat but this is a puppy and he might be more affected by hot weather. I will watch him carefully and try to keep him inside during the hottest part of the day.

Last night, after the sun went down and it was lots cooler, he enjoyed his usual running like a little bat out of hell all over the yard.......so cute.:D High energy dogs have to run off that energy some how!
 

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I don't recall my other Aussie being very sensitive to the heat but this is a puppy and he might be more affected by hot weather. I will watch him carefully and try to keep him inside during the hottest part of the day.

Last night, after the sun went down and it was lots cooler, he enjoyed his usual running like a little bat out of hell all over the yard.......so cute.:D High energy dogs have to run off that energy some how!
I'm not sure heat problems are breed oriented though I suppose some might be better, It's more the individual dog's body that's the problem. It's the same with people some have no problems, with other people heat can be a severe problem, we are smart enough (usually) to stay out of trouble,
 

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I'm not sure heat problems are breed oriented though I suppose some might be better, It's more the individual dog's body that's the problem. It's the same with people some have no problems, with other people heat can be a severe problem, we are smart enough (usually) to stay out of trouble,
Indeed true; I am very sensitive to the sun and stay out of it for the most part. I have that white skin that turns red and never tans and there is skin cancer (melanoma) in my family history!!
 
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