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Sorry if I didn't post this in the right place. :(

So... Bella was diagnosed with a Heart Murmur the other month. Which was devastating news to me when my vet first uttered the words. She saw how mortified I was and quickly said that there is the possibility that what she hears could just be a flow murmur (it will go away) but she said it was a little louder than what she'd have liked for it to be a flow murmur - grade 2.5-3/5. She also informed me that if she needs an echo - that depending on the cause Bella has the possibility to live a long, healthy life (aside from the murmur) or because of the murmur...she could have an extremely short life :Cry:

Every vet visit since I've asked her to check it and each time she's told me that it doesn't sound as loud as the time before! I took her Tuesday for her first Lyme shot and recheck and after a long silence as she listened said that she still has the murmur :(.

She goes back in a couple weeks for the second Lyme shot and to have the murmur listened to again by our vet and by another. This is putting her really close to her six month birthday and her spay. Belle's vet wants to spay her before her first heat (Which would be awesome) as she said it pretty much reduces her risk for breast cancer (which is what my Pyr lost her battle with in the end), which by this point I was almost in tears at the thought of -another- dog with cancer. She quickly said that even if she's not spayed before her first heat that as long as she is before the second the risk is minimal.

If they feel the murmur will not go away she has to go for an echo before she can be scheduled for her spay. I'm deathly afraid that something is going to go terribly wrong :(.

I'm sorry for my rant. :( I needed somewhere to just let it go and put it out there :(.
 

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Sorry if I didn't post this in the right place. :(

So... Bella was diagnosed with a Heart Murmur the other month. Which was devastating news to me when my vet first uttered the words. She saw how mortified I was and quickly said that there is the possibility that what she hears could just be a flow murmur (it will go away) but she said it was a little louder than what she'd have liked for it to be a flow murmur - grade 2.5-3/5. She also informed me that if she needs an echo - that depending on the cause Bella has the possibility to live a long, healthy life (aside from the murmur) or because of the murmur...she could have an extremely short life :Cry:

Every vet visit since I've asked her to check it and each time she's told me that it doesn't sound as loud as the time before! I took her Tuesday for her first Lyme shot and recheck and after a long silence as she listened said that she still has the murmur :(.

She goes back in a couple weeks for the second Lyme shot and to have the murmur listened to again by our vet and by another. This is putting her really close to her six month birthday and her spay. Belle's vet wants to spay her before her first heat (Which would be awesome) as she said it pretty much reduces her risk for breast cancer (which is what my Pyr lost her battle with in the end), which by this point I was almost in tears at the thought of -another- dog with cancer. She quickly said that even if she's not spayed before her first heat that as long as she is before the second the risk is minimal.

If they feel the murmur will not go away she has to go for an echo before she can be scheduled for her spay. I'm deathly afraid that something is going to go terribly wrong :(.

I'm sorry for my rant. :( I needed somewhere to just let it go and put it out there :(.
Not a vet and not prescribing, but you might want to look at a product put out by Standard Process called Cardio Plus. My vet internist hates it, but my holistic vet loves it. I did have one puppy in my last litter with a murmur (and he was also falling behind the other puppies). By 8 weeks, neither the holistic vet nor my western vet could hear the murmur. When my epileptic dog Willie was having a slow and irregular heart beat, he was referred to the internist. Before our appointment, I used the cardio on him. She lectured me about giving him "that stuff" but the fact was, she couldn't find a problem.
 

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Not a vet and not prescribing, but you might want to look at a product put out by Standard Process called Cardio Plus. My vet internist hates it, but my holistic vet loves it. I did have one puppy in my last litter with a murmer (and he was also falling behind the other puppies). By 8 weeks, neither the holistic vet nor my western vet could hear the murmur. When my epileptic dog Willie was having a slow and irregular heart beat, he was referred to the internist. Before our appointment, I used the cardio on him. She lectured me about giving him "that stuff" but the fact was, she couldn't find a problem.
I'll look into it! Thank you so much :D
 

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I dont know anything about heart murmurs in dogs, but a bit about them in people. I used to work as an MA for a cardiologist. In people, they are quite common and not serious. I cant imagine it would be all that different in dogs. My mom has a murmur, so do other people I know, and it doesnt hinder them at all. Talk to your vet about it more. I could be wrong, wouldnt be the first time, but I dont think this is something to lose sleep over. Perhaps you might want to ask about doing the echocardiogram while she's under anesthesia for her spay? It's a super simple test and then they can see exactly whats going on, and hopefully it'll put your mind at ease.
 

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I dont know anything about heart murmurs in dogs, but a bit about them in people. I used to work as an MA for a cardiologist. In people, they are quite common and not serious. I cant imagine it would be all that different in dogs. My mom has a murmur, so do other people I know, and it doesnt hinder them at all. Talk to your vet about it more. I could be wrong, wouldnt be the first time, but I dont think this is something to lose sleep over. Perhaps you might want to ask about doing the echocardiogram while she's under anesthesia for her spay? It's a super simple test and then they can see exactly whats going on, and hopefully it'll put your mind at ease.
Thank you very much :). I'll ask when we go back. She had said if it is still there that she'll have to get the echo done before she gets her spay. For a super simple test my vet has a hefty price tag for it. 400-600 dollars X_X.
She's also going to take my right arm, left leg and first born to cover Bella's spay. xD
 

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Oh geez. Thats expensive :( The procedure itself is simple and just takes a few minutes, at least on people, maybe they're trying to recoup the cost of buying the machine. Perhaps you can just talk about it then and skip the echo. Sometimes I question myself not having pet insurance :( I wish you the best.
 

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Thanks bunches Labmom :). I think I'll have a lengthy discussion with her when we go back in a couple weeks. Weigh my options and see what the second vet has to say about her murmur.
 

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Honestly, having once lost a dog after surgery to an undiagnosed heart issue, I always request an EKG, also want bloodwork and a tech monitoring (though we'd had all that except the EKG with Jack.) I'd especially want it if I knew my dog had some heart irregularities. I don't remember exact amt., but I think that's a lot more than I've paid for one.
 

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Try not to freak out yet. I haven't had dogs with murmurs, but I have a cat, Elle, who had a heart murmur from the time she was born. Elle's murmur is severe, graded at a 5 most of her life. When she was a kitten, the vet warned us that she might not live long, that her heart could just give out one day and that would be it. She was our first pet, and my husband and I freaked out. That said, she is 9 years old now, and she has been spayed, and been put under one other time for an abscessed tooth removal/dental procedure. She has always done fine under anesthesia and never showed overt signs of having a heart problem. Anyway, I'm just saying that you should try not to worry too much until you have spoken with the second vet, and done any necessary testing. Easier said than done, I know!
 

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Oh I hope it all works out! My very first own dog a dobie pup was diagnosed with a murmur at 8wks. old. It disappeared by the time he was 9 mo. old. Maybe hers will just be a little longer going away on its own. They did say it was not as loud. Maybe it is slow going away on its own.
 

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Oh gosh, that's horrible! I'm so sorry.
But have a little hope, my Pomeranian has always had a heart murmur, and he just turned 17 years old! The vets have said, besides the heart murmur, he is doing extremely well, and he has lived a long, happy life with us.
We rescued him when he was 9, and he already had it, so I cant really tell you much about his past and how everything worked out, but I can wish you and your doggy luck and prayers!
 

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Thank you all so very -very- much. It means -so- much to me. We'll see how her next visit goes and what they really have to say after the other vet listens in on it.

Your Pomeranian, Melting Candy - is amazing! 17 years old! You are very blessed :).

Again, thank you all very -very- much :).
 

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Poor Bella. Hugs!
As for the echo - as a person who works with humans when we are talking about murmurs it is next to impossible to tell anything about a murmur looking at an EKG. Nada. I can tell you the electrical system is fine, all the nodes, you can see blocks, but you are limited in what you can see physically on those lines. You can sometimes see hypertrophy (enlargement) by measuring how long it takes the signal to make it through the heart and you can see physical damage to the heart (by how the electrical signal goes through the tissue such as a heart attack), and some other physical attributes but murmurs - I've never been able to see anything about a murmur on an EKG. An echo will show the actual physical make-up of the heart and the blood flow through it. They will be able to actually visualize the murmur and see just how bad (or not bad at all) it really is.
As the owners you are entitled to say you want to have it done or not (and it is a pretty penny) but you may have to respect the vet on considering the spay to big of a risk without knowing how bad the murmur really is and not wanting to do the spay without the echo. Surgery is a huge stress on any being and the more ready you are the better it goes.
Good luck to Bella!
 

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3 out of 4 of my dogs have heart murmurs. One dog was born with a pulmonary stenosis. It is mild and has remained so. The other two have murmurs attributed to beginning mitral valve disease. Two dogs have echos done every 12 to 18 months. The other is checked by ascultation annually. All of my dogs are seen by a cardiologist. One dog is heart clear.

It is possible that your dog has a flow murmur that is not serious. That does happen in some puppies. (I hope that is the case) If there is a murmur that is attributed to something more serious, I would strongly suggest you locate a cardiologist. Many breed clubs have health clinics that include ascultations by cardiologists. My cardiologist offered a discount for echos for dogs who were diagnosed with a murmur at the clinic.

My dogs are not slowed down by their murmurs at this point. (They range in age from 7 to 9 years). One actively competes in agility, another is in training for agility. None are on heart meds yet. I do give them COQ 10 daily...just cuz.....

Good luck and I hope you get good news. If there is something more serious, there are some great meds out there that can help keep your dog happy and active for as long as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Poor Bella. Hugs!
As for the echo - as a person who works with humans when we are talking about murmurs it is next to impossible to tell anything about a murmur looking at an EKG. Nada. I can tell you the electrical system is fine, all the nodes, you can see blocks, but you are limited in what you can see physically on those lines. You can sometimes see hypertrophy (enlargement) by measuring how long it takes the signal to make it through the heart and you can see physical damage to the heart (by how the electrical signal goes through the tissue such as a heart attack), and some other physical attributes but murmurs - I've never been able to see anything about a murmur on an EKG. An echo will show the actual physical make-up of the heart and the blood flow through it. They will be able to actually visualize the murmur and see just how bad (or not bad at all) it really is.
As the owners you are entitled to say you want to have it done or not (and it is a pretty penny) but you may have to respect the vet on considering the spay to big of a risk without knowing how bad the murmur really is and not wanting to do the spay without the echo. Surgery is a huge stress on any being and the more ready you are the better it goes.
Good luck to Bella!
Thanks much Charis :). I'm not entirely sure what's going to be done. I'm going to talk to the vet and weigh every option we have and talk with her about all options you all have given us :). Thank you again!

3 out of 4 of my dogs have heart murmurs. One dog was born with a pulmonary stenosis. It is mild and has remained so. The other two have murmurs attributed to beginning mitral valve disease. Two dogs have echos done every 12 to 18 months. The other is checked by ascultation annually. All of my dogs are seen by a cardiologist. One dog is heart clear.

It is possible that your dog has a flow murmur that is not serious. That does happen in some puppies. (I hope that is the case) If there is a murmur that is attributed to something more serious, I would strongly suggest you locate a cardiologist. Many breed clubs have health clinics that include ascultations by cardiologists. My cardiologist offered a discount for echos for dogs who were diagnosed with a murmur at the clinic.

My dogs are not slowed down by their murmurs at this point. (They range in age from 7 to 9 years). One actively competes in agility, another is in training for agility. None are on heart meds yet. I do give them COQ 10 daily...just cuz.....

Good luck and I hope you get good news. If there is something more serious, there are some great meds out there that can help keep your dog happy and active for as long as possible.
Thanks So Cav :D. She is in every way a normal well-adjusted puppy. Playing, rough housing, biting, scratching, running etc getting into everything and anything. I'll start looking into a cardiologist just in case. :)
Thanks again!
 
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