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Oy! My lovely 1 year old catahoula bulldog has a BIG problem with eating things around the house. And I'm talking chewing up, ingesting, then either vomiting or pooing them out. His item of choice is normally a pair of socks, and how he finds them is beyond me because since we realized he was doing it socks were NEVER left around the house..he must have a stash somewhere. Anyway, does anyone else know about or have the same problem with their pup? I understand he is still a puppy of sorts but honestly, I'm over this. He most recently ate half of a box of tissues, for SOME reason..never done that before. He had even digested some that he didn't throw up and then I caught him eating the poo mixed with tissues outside. I'm about to lose my mind and I need a little bit of a pat on the back or something to let me know that I can deal with this! Thanks to anyone for their input. Oh, and by the way, I have consulted with my vet about this but was given no direction and told "he'll grow out of it"...that was 6 months ago.
 

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Owen's Mom,

Unfortunately, most cases like this are behavioral ones and need to be worked out with an experienced dog trainer.

Bad news, every vet should offer to do a full work-up to make sure there is NO underlying medical issues before diagnosing behavioral problems. As a veterinary technician, "He'll grow out of it" gives me the impression that your vet thinks it's behavioral. My advise is to find another vet. Mention to a new vet that you are looking for a second opinion. The second vet may take this as a sign that he can woo you away from your current vet and might do a very good diagnostic work-up (for the right price of course).

I can think of a half dozen medical reasons that your dog may be grazing on anything and everything, including "pica," a disorder that causes this behavior, and many digestive disorders that causes a dog to not absorb all the nutrients it needs from his normal food (so he in turns consumes objects to fulfill them).

Again more than likely it is a behavioral problem but bottom line is your vet should want to get to the bottom of things as much as you do and if he doesn't, you need to find one that will.

Love and Luck,
Jenna
 
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